New research identifies increasing trust tension among European consumers in how organisations use their personal data

New study by Orange – Future of Digital Trust – shows lack of trust is undermining opportunities for more personalised and useful services

78% of consumers think it is hard to trust companies when it comes to use of their data, and 70% think there are few or no trusted ways to find out about personal data use

Better transparency, consumer control, and education required in order to address imbalance

Press release

Orange  has released the findings of new research into consumer concerns about how companies use their personal data – research which clearly demonstrates that all businesses need to work together to rebuild consumer trust.

This first instalment of an independent, three-part study with consumers across France, Poland, Spain and the UK highlights that consumers are increasingly wary about how their information is being used; do not feel in control; and do not believe there are any resources to help educate them on how to manage their data online.

Indeed, over three-quarters (78 per cent) state that it is hard to trust companies when it comes to the way they use consumer personal data.

An identical figure (78 per cent) feel that service providers hold too much information about consumer behaviour and preferences.

Meanwhile, 82 per cent feel they have little power to control the way their personal data is used by organisations.

While there are exciting opportunities for both consumers and service providers that can be built on intelligent, consensual and responsible use of consumer data – trustworthy data use is increasingly a fundamental requirement, and is having a greater impact on companies’ overall reputations.

In fact, 29 per cent of consumers trust companies less over the past year in general, while 16 per cent report more and 55 per cent have neither more nor less trust, clearly illustrating that trust is in decline.

“Faced with the rapid development of uses of consumer data, more needs to be done to help consumers understand and manage how their personal data is used,” said Daniel Gurrola, vp for business vision with Orange.

“In 2013, Orange made a commitment to our customers and the European Commission to increase transparency and control. 1

“We have started on this journey with increased transparency and new services such as Orange’s personal data dashboard, but this research shows that we, as an industry, have much more to do.”

The trust gap is increasing

The independent research points clearly to an increasing trust tension towards organisations holding consumer data, as well as a lack of trust in the responsible use of that data.

Of most concern, is the fact that trust is waning, with multiple sectors seeing a decline in the last year.

Which organisations do you trust less / more than a year ago?

Financial institutions: 31 per cent of respondents trust less than a year ago (21 per cent trust more)

Device manufacturers: 19 per cent less / (18 per cent more)

Mobile operators: 26% less / (16% more)

Internet service providers: 26% less / (16% more)

App developers: 26% less / (13% more)

 Social networks: 46% less / (12% more)

The research shows that the treatment of personal data is a primary driver of consumer trust in organisations, and is almost as important as the quality of the core services that an organisation delivers. 

Trust in organisations to use personal data online also varies by vertical sector, with financial institutions being most, and social networks being least trusted:

Who do you trust to use/protect personal data?

Financial institutions: 51%

Mobile operators: 41%

Device manufacturers: 41%

Internet service providers: 41%

App developers: 24%

Social networks: 20%

Imbalance of benefits

Alongside the issues around trust are concerns about who benefits most from the data that consumers share with organisations:

Just 6% of respondents feel that the consumer is the main beneficiary of organisations gathering information about customer purchasing behaviour or history

67% say that the organisations themselves benefit most

Just 16% see the benefits as being equally shared

The research also demonstrates that consumers today do not think they are well informed about how their data is used or how to manage it, and there is currently no clear consumer champion to educate them.

Consumer bodies are doing the best job, but the relatively low figures suggest there is a need for improvement across the board:

Who educates consumers about managing personal data?

Consumer bodies: 36%

Mobile operators: 20%

Internet service providers: 20%

National government organisations: 12%

Don’t know / None: 37%

However, it is perhaps most telling that 37% cannot think of any organisations that are doing a good job of educating the consumer about managing their personal data.

Tackling the problem is a collective responsibility

Consumers are clearly saying that work needs to be done by all businesses in order to address the issue of trust and ensure that the opportunities created by use of data – for both the consumer and companies involved – are not lost.

Importantly, the research indicates all businesses have a role to play, and only through working together will consumer trust be increased.

Orange is making a call to action around three key areas which need addressing by all businesses: –

Transparency – the industry needs to be more answerable and transparent about data usage and data sharing

Control – the industry needs to provide tools to allow consumers to control their data, dialling up, or dialling down as they wish, and receiving the services and benefits accordingly. Data sharing must be an informed decision from the consumer

Education – there is currently no stand-out body who is seen to be educating the consumer about how to control their data. The industry must therefore act as a collective consumer champion and show the way forward

Fundamentally, consumers want the balance redressed in order to gain greater control of their personal data and benefit more from sharing their data.

This can be achieved by providing consumers with transparent data policies and offering tools to help them control use of their data.

The executive summary and an overview of the results can be downloaded at www.orange.com/digitaltrust<

about the Orange Data Privacy Charter

Orange aims to be recognised by its customers, users and partners as their “trusted operator”. To that end the Group has made clear and solid commitments to protecting personal data and respecting our customers’ privacy. On 7th November, at the Hello 2013 Show, Stéphane Richard officially signed a charter comprising 4 commitments to protecting our customers’ personal data and privacy : –

security of customers’ personal data through its reliable processing and secure storage

control for customers over their own personal data and how it is used, including a personal dashboard

 transparency in terms of the handling of data for its customers and users at all stages throughout our relationship

support for all its customers and users to help them protect their privacy and manage their personal data better

To learn more about the Orange Personal Data Charter, click here>.

about the Future of Digital Trust research

Loudhouse conducted 2,023 online interviews among adults 13+ who have a mobile phone in the France, Poland, Spain and the UK. Fieldwork was conducted in December 2013 and January 2014.

about Orange

Orange is one of the world’s leading telecommunications operators with sales of 43.5 billion euros in 2012 and had 166,000 employees worldwide at 30 September 2013, including 102,000 employees in France. Present in 32 countries, the Group had a total customer base of more than 232 million customers at 30 September 2013, including 175 million mobile customers and 15 million fixed broadband customers worldwide. Orange is also a leading provider of global IT and telecommunication services to multinational companies, under the brand Orange Business Services.
Orange is listed on the NYSE Euronext Paris (symbol ORA) and on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol ORAN).
For more information: http://www.orange.com>, www.orange-business.com<


GoMo News

New research identifies increasing trust tension among European consumers in how organisations use their personal data

New study by Orange – Future of Digital Trust – shows lack of trust is undermining opportunities for more personalised and useful services

78% of consumers think it is hard to trust companies when it comes to use of their data, and 70% think there are few or no trusted ways to find out about personal data use

Better transparency, consumer control, and education required in order to address imbalance

Press release

Orange  has released the findings of new research into consumer concerns about how companies use their personal data – research which clearly demonstrates that all businesses need to work together to rebuild consumer trust.

This first instalment of an independent, three-part study with consumers across France, Poland, Spain and the UK highlights that consumers are increasingly wary about how their information is being used; do not feel in control; and do not believe there are any resources to help educate them on how to manage their data online.

Indeed, over three-quarters (78 per cent) state that it is hard to trust companies when it comes to the way they use consumer personal data.

An identical figure (78 per cent) feel that service providers hold too much information about consumer behaviour and preferences.

Meanwhile, 82 per cent feel they have little power to control the way their personal data is used by organisations.

While there are exciting opportunities for both consumers and service providers that can be built on intelligent, consensual and responsible use of consumer data – trustworthy data use is increasingly a fundamental requirement, and is having a greater impact on companies’ overall reputations.

In fact, 29 per cent of consumers trust companies less over the past year in general, while 16 per cent report more and 55 per cent have neither more nor less trust, clearly illustrating that trust is in decline.

“Faced with the rapid development of uses of consumer data, more needs to be done to help consumers understand and manage how their personal data is used,” said Daniel Gurrola, vp for business vision with Orange.

“In 2013, Orange made a commitment to our customers and the European Commission to increase transparency and control. 1

“We have started on this journey with increased transparency and new services such as Orange’s personal data dashboard, but this research shows that we, as an industry, have much more to do.”

The trust gap is increasing

The independent research points clearly to an increasing trust tension towards organisations holding consumer data, as well as a lack of trust in the responsible use of that data.

Of most concern, is the fact that trust is waning, with multiple sectors seeing a decline in the last year.

Which organisations do you trust less / more than a year ago?

Financial institutions: 31 per cent of respondents trust less than a year ago (21 per cent trust more)

Device manufacturers: 19 per cent less / (18 per cent more)

Mobile operators: 26% less / (16% more)

Internet service providers: 26% less / (16% more)

App developers: 26% less / (13% more)

 Social networks: 46% less / (12% more)

The research shows that the treatment of personal data is a primary driver of consumer trust in organisations, and is almost as important as the quality of the core services that an organisation delivers. 

Trust in organisations to use personal data online also varies by vertical sector, with financial institutions being most, and social networks being least trusted:

Who do you trust to use/protect personal data?

Financial institutions: 51%

Mobile operators: 41%

Device manufacturers: 41%

Internet service providers: 41%

App developers: 24%

Social networks: 20%

Imbalance of benefits

Alongside the issues around trust are concerns about who benefits most from the data that consumers share with organisations:

Just 6% of respondents feel that the consumer is the main beneficiary of organisations gathering information about customer purchasing behaviour or history

67% say that the organisations themselves benefit most

Just 16% see the benefits as being equally shared

The research also demonstrates that consumers today do not think they are well informed about how their data is used or how to manage it, and there is currently no clear consumer champion to educate them.

Consumer bodies are doing the best job, but the relatively low figures suggest there is a need for improvement across the board:

Who educates consumers about managing personal data?

Consumer bodies: 36%

Mobile operators: 20%

Internet service providers: 20%

National government organisations: 12%

Don’t know / None: 37%

However, it is perhaps most telling that 37% cannot think of any organisations that are doing a good job of educating the consumer about managing their personal data.

Tackling the problem is a collective responsibility

Consumers are clearly saying that work needs to be done by all businesses in order to address the issue of trust and ensure that the opportunities created by use of data – for both the consumer and companies involved – are not lost.

Importantly, the research indicates all businesses have a role to play, and only through working together will consumer trust be increased.

Orange is making a call to action around three key areas which need addressing by all businesses: –

Transparency – the industry needs to be more answerable and transparent about data usage and data sharing

Control – the industry needs to provide tools to allow consumers to control their data, dialling up, or dialling down as they wish, and receiving the services and benefits accordingly. Data sharing must be an informed decision from the consumer

Education – there is currently no stand-out body who is seen to be educating the consumer about how to control their data. The industry must therefore act as a collective consumer champion and show the way forward

Fundamentally, consumers want the balance redressed in order to gain greater control of their personal data and benefit more from sharing their data.

This can be achieved by providing consumers with transparent data policies and offering tools to help them control use of their data.

The executive summary and an overview of the results can be downloaded at www.orange.com/digitaltrust<

about the Orange Data Privacy Charter

Orange aims to be recognised by its customers, users and partners as their “trusted operator”. To that end the Group has made clear and solid commitments to protecting personal data and respecting our customers’ privacy. On 7th November, at the Hello 2013 Show, Stéphane Richard officially signed a charter comprising 4 commitments to protecting our customers’ personal data and privacy : –

security of customers’ personal data through its reliable processing and secure storage

control for customers over their own personal data and how it is used, including a personal dashboard

 transparency in terms of the handling of data for its customers and users at all stages throughout our relationship

support for all its customers and users to help them protect their privacy and manage their personal data better

To learn more about the Orange Personal Data Charter, click here>.

about the Future of Digital Trust research

Loudhouse conducted 2,023 online interviews among adults 13+ who have a mobile phone in the France, Poland, Spain and the UK. Fieldwork was conducted in December 2013 and January 2014.

about Orange

Orange is one of the world’s leading telecommunications operators with sales of 43.5 billion euros in 2012 and had 166,000 employees worldwide at 30 September 2013, including 102,000 employees in France. Present in 32 countries, the Group had a total customer base of more than 232 million customers at 30 September 2013, including 175 million mobile customers and 15 million fixed broadband customers worldwide. Orange is also a leading provider of global IT and telecommunication services to multinational companies, under the brand Orange Business Services.
Orange is listed on the NYSE Euronext Paris (symbol ORA) and on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol ORAN).
For more information: http://www.orange.com>, www.orange-business.com<


GoMo News

Disney Infinity: Toy Box updated with new toy bundles, rewards program

disney-infinity-toy-box-update-2

Disney Interactive has announced a game-changing update for its Disney Infinity: Toy Box app on iOS, giving gamers access to a fully playable version of Disney Infinity’s Toy Box mode, and the ability to add new toys to their Toy Boxes without connecting to the console version of the game. The app now includes waves one and two of the platform’s power discs, a group of pre-made adventures, and all of the Mastery Tutorials found in the console and PC title.

New to the app is the Toy Box rewards program, which gives players free items for their loyalty. When fans login to the Disney Infinity app at least four times in a single week, they’ll unlock some of these pre-made adventures (selected from the console game) and toys they can use in their creations.

There are 11 adventures available to earn in all, and users will win three Toy Box items for each adventure they complete. Since these adventures are completed with specific characters, the game offers access to those characters even if players do not own them.

disney-infinity-toy-box-update

In addition, three Toy Box items are rewarded to players for completing each of the six free Mastery Tutorials.

Additional Disney Infinity characters are available via in-app purchase, with each offering two character-specific Toy Box items. If players have already purchased characters before this update, they’ll receive the matching toys automatically after updating the app.

Disney Infinity: Toy Box is available to download for free on iOS and the Windows Store. Check back soon to follow the game on AppData, our tracking platform for mobile and social apps and developers.


Inside Mobile Apps

Disney Infinity: Toy Box updated with new toy bundles, rewards program

disney-infinity-toy-box-update-2

Disney Interactive has announced a game-changing update for its Disney Infinity: Toy Box app on iOS, giving gamers access to a fully playable version of Disney Infinity’s Toy Box mode, and the ability to add new toys to their Toy Boxes without connecting to the console version of the game. The app now includes waves one and two of the platform’s power discs, a group of pre-made adventures, and all of the Mastery Tutorials found in the console and PC title.

New to the app is the Toy Box rewards program, which gives players free items for their loyalty. When fans login to the Disney Infinity app at least four times in a single week, they’ll unlock some of these pre-made adventures (selected from the console game) and toys they can use in their creations.

There are 11 adventures available to earn in all, and users will win three Toy Box items for each adventure they complete. Since these adventures are completed with specific characters, the game offers access to those characters even if players do not own them.

disney-infinity-toy-box-update

In addition, three Toy Box items are rewarded to players for completing each of the six free Mastery Tutorials.

Additional Disney Infinity characters are available via in-app purchase, with each offering two character-specific Toy Box items. If players have already purchased characters before this update, they’ll receive the matching toys automatically after updating the app.

Disney Infinity: Toy Box is available to download for free on iOS and the Windows Store. Check back soon to follow the game on AppData, our tracking platform for mobile and social apps and developers.


Inside Mobile Apps

Gallery: Nokia Lumia 1320

Published by at 9:35 UTC, March 8th 2014

In this gallery, we offer a visual tour of the recently released Nokia Lumia 1320, a mid-range Windows Phone device with a large six inch screen and LTE (4G) connectivity. The smartphone, built around a 1.7GHz dual-core Snapdragon 400 processor, is available in white, red, black, and yellow, and is now on sale in select markets, with a price tag of £270 / $ 339 (before taxes and subsidies). 

The latest addition to the Lumia range is essentially a low cost version of the Lumia 1520; a similar comparison could be drawn between the Nokia Lumia 920 and Nokia Lumia 720, but the device also offers a complimentary choice to the Lumia 625, Nokia’s current mid tier hero device.

The lower price point of the Lumia 1320 has been achieved by cutting a few specification points. The most obvious of these are the processor, RAM, and camera, but also notable is the use of a single HAAC microphone and the reduced size of the internal storage. On the plus side the cuts made to the Lumia 1320 are less severe than those for the Lumia 520 and 620. For example, the Lumia 1320’s screen is protected by Gorilla Glass 3, usually only found in higher end devices. More importantly, the on board sensor package includes a compass, though not a gyroscope, allowing for full use of the HERE software suit, including augmented reality based functionality.

Nokia Lumia 1320 (click images to expand):

Filed: > >
Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Phones
 

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All About Windows Phone

Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 unboxing (Video)

Samsung unveiled a slew of new tablets at CES back in January. Some of them were interesting, but the Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 is what truly caught our eye – particularly its super sharp display.

At 8.4 diagonal inches, the Super Clear LCD panel has a very impressive QWXGA resolution, or 2,560 by 1,600 pixels. That’s a density that rivals many smartphones, let alone competing tablets. And the rest under the hood sounds great, as well: 2GB RAM, 16GB, Snapdragon 800, and a 4,800mAh battery.

Is this the small tablet to buy? Is it worth the money? That’s what we’re here to find out. While we do, be sure to give the below Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 unboxing a watch!


Pocketnow

Practical Meter review

Pmeter-w-cables

Overall Score

4.58

Practical Meter

Price & Value

Fast Charge Cables

Practical Meter review Reviewed by on Mar 6. Rating: 4.5

The Practical Meter by Power Practical is an in-line USB charging gauge to tell you if your device is being charged at its full potential. As one might expect, this is measured by amperage.

lithium4400-w-practicalmeter

At First Glance

The Practical Meter’s LED Indicators are your way of knowing how fast your device is charging. In today’s world of having USB ports everywhere (computers, AC adapters, etc) we quickly understand that not all ports are created equally. Some will charge your device at a mere 25%, some at 100% strength. The Practical Meter is what will define those differences for you. This way you can toss those slow charging cables and adapters aside for something more efficient.

Function & Fast Charge Cables

No issues to expect or run into as far as functions go, leveling between one and ten watts. The fast charge cables (included) have been exceedingly engaging and definitely speed up the charging process on slower USB connections. Fast Charge cables are equipped with a Micro USB 2.0 cable, Apple iPod 30pin USB cable, and Mini USB cable all fused by a charge-only USB male cable.

Overview

USB Power Meters are a rare gem and the Practical Meter really does the the job well. The device is available in black and white color options and can be purchased at Power Practical for $ 24.99.

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AndroidGuys

Disney Infinity: Toy Box updated with new toy bundles, rewards program

disney-infinity-toy-box-update-2

Disney Interactive has announced a game-changing update for its Disney Infinity: Toy Box app on iOS, giving gamers access to a fully playable version of Disney Infinity’s Toy Box mode, and the ability to add new toys to their Toy Boxes without connecting to the console version of the game. The app now includes waves one and two of the platform’s power discs, a group of pre-made adventures, and all of the Mastery Tutorials found in the console and PC title.

New to the app is the Toy Box rewards program, which gives players free items for their loyalty. When fans login to the Disney Infinity app at least four times in a single week, they’ll unlock some of these pre-made adventures (selected from the console game) and toys they can use in their creations.

There are 11 adventures available to earn in all, and users will win three Toy Box items for each adventure they complete. Since these adventures are completed with specific characters, the game offers access to those characters even if players do not own them.

disney-infinity-toy-box-update

In addition, three Toy Box items are rewarded to players for completing each of the six free Mastery Tutorials.

Additional Disney Infinity characters are available via in-app purchase, with each offering two character-specific Toy Box items. If players have already purchased characters before this update, they’ll receive the matching toys automatically after updating the app.

Disney Infinity: Toy Box is available to download for free on iOS and the Windows Store. Check back soon to follow the game on AppData, our tracking platform for mobile and social apps and developers.


Inside Mobile Apps

Pebble releases app with official appstore to Google Play, announces three more partners

test2-870x362

It’s been over a month since iOS Pebble users received an update to the Pebble app with the new appstore baked in, but starting today, Android user can finally do the same.

The updated Pebble app is now available in Google Play. All of the app’s bugs are fixed so Pebblers on any platform can enjoy the same seamless and delightful experience of downloading from “a whole new universe of apps and watchfaces.”

Pebble took to its official blog today to give special thanks to the users and developers who tested its Android beta builds, whose help and feedback was said to have been “invaluable.” One of the last betas was released just two days ago, so it shows how hard the Kickstarter funded start-up has been working.

Now that Pebble for Android 2.0 is available, all you have to do is update the app, then not only is your smartwatch automatically updated, but you also get the store, which is laid out in different sections for apps and watchfaces, and has subsections under apps for Tools & Utilities, Notifications, Remotes, Fitness, Games, and “Daily” applications.

The appstore makes it much easier to find and install apps than before, when you had to sideload or use third-party app stores.

In addition to this announcement, Pebble also welcomed three new partners launching apps on the Pebble appstore: eBay, Evernote, and Time Warner Cable, who join not only Mercedes-Benz, Yelp, and Foursquare, but the many independent developers as well.

140307.eBay_

The eBay app lets users quickly and easily access their eBay Feed and discover products on their smartwatch, Evernote gives Pebble users the power to check their notes when away from a computers or if checking their smartphone is difficult, and Timer Warner Cable’s app allows Intelligent Home subscribers to control their home right from their wrists.

pebble-blogimage

All of these apps continue to prove what is possible with such a minimalist smartwatch. For complete notes on the 2.0 release, hit up the source below.

VIA Pebble

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AndroidGuys

MWC: GoMo discusses key themes with Barclays’ Skinner

Internet of Things surprisingly commonplace at show

skinner -even iphones had nfc @ mwc

Let’s face it, Mobile World Congress [MWC] Barcelona 2014 did well. Attendance was up by 18 per cent compared to 2013. Event organisers, the GSMA, announced that over 80,000 visitors from 201 countries attended the 2014 event plus more than 5,000 people participated in a range of partner programmes. As the dust settles on MWC 2014, GoMo News talked with Andrew Skinner who is relationship director for Technology, Media & Telecoms (TMT) at Barclays [Bank], about the major themes from this year’s show. These included wearable technology (no surprises there); 4G; IoT [Internet of Things]; NFC [Near Field Communication] – as well as security, of course.

In terms of security and privacy, Samsung announcing its secure Knox solution for mobile devices. Then there was Boeing’s Blackphone which cclaims to be super secure.

Mobile devices, owned by corporations and employees alike as a rseult of BOYD [Bring Your Own Device] implementations, will increasingly be used to access sensitive corporate networks and data via such solutions.

“It will be fascinating to see how uptake and adoption of secure devices and services evolves in the next twelve months, and whether companies are genuinely planning to place more emphasis on mobile device security,” Skinner observed.

Wearable technology was fairly prevalent at the show, but with many devices seemingly aimed primarily at promoting healthy living.

“Sony’s SmartBand promises to track everything in a user’s life and Samsung unveiled no less than three different variations of smartwatch – all of which extend the functionality of mobile technology,” Skinner added.

4G is still being pushed heavily by mobile network operators [MNOs] and handset vendors alike.

Especially as as huge investments are made in not only the infrastructure to support it.

That’s not to say, however, LTE isn’t still without its issues. Meanwhile some people at MWC 2014 were certainly talking about 5G as it’s also being heavily invested in.

Skinner says, “The EU is pushing for roll-out plans to be ready by 2015, but we’re probably a few years off this becoming a reality.”

At MWC 2014, NFC was being promoted heavily by the GSMA and there were even NFC enabled sleeves for iPhones available for free, so iPhone users could take advantage of the NFC access points across the conference hall.

Finally there as the Internet of Things [IoT], which is slowly gaining traction, which was a strikingly common theme at the show.

“The number of ‘connected cars’ on display at MWC this year just goes to show how interwoven disparate industries are becoming as connectivity becomes an essential component of virtually every product,” Skinner reckons.

He continued, “From the connected home, to the GSMA’s Connected City stand, every ‘thing’ is effectively becoming an extension of communications devices, or vice versa.”

“At Barclays we’ll be watching with interest to see which of these technologies companies invest in this year [2014], and whether they can drive widespread adoption.”

Hans Cett is an established freelance author and consultant specialising in the mobile communications industry. He also writes for Countdown2MWC – http://countdown2mwc.wordpress.com/


GoMo News