Tag Archives: 1020

The Nokia Lumia 1020 FAQ for Windows 10 Mobile

[Of course, the feature here has been based on the latest build 10149 of the OS – it’s possible that some things will change before the final release. Just sayin’….!]

Lumia 1020 camera island

What camera applications come with Windows 10 Mobile?

It depends on which device you have – it seems that the ‘Nokia’-branded phones above a certain specification will retain ‘Lumia Camera’ (in fact, in the current build it’s still called ‘Nokia Camera’ initially, until it’s replaced in the Store with the new name), as well as ‘Camera’, a clear derivative of Lumia Camera 5.x but adapted for as wide a device pool as possible. Lumia Camera contains extra ‘smarts’ that know how to handle the extra microphones and optics in some models. 

However, Lumia Camera for Windows 10 Mobile ends up as v4.9.4.1, i.e. exactly the same as you’re currently using under Windows Phone 8.1. So it seems as though you can carry on as before – nothing need change. 

Interestingly, (Windows) Camera gives its version number as v5.38.2004.0, indicating an evolution of Lumia Camera 5 (still on v5.0.2.51 on the Lumia 930 etc.), though it’s clever enough to handle each device on its own merits in terms of ‘Rich Capture’ – the 1020’s mechanical shutter and slow capture mean that this feature simply wouldn’t work – and so it’s not offered.

So I can carry on using ‘Dual Capture’, PureView zooming, ‘Reframing’, and shooting RAW?

Absolutely. Your default camera is set to Lumia Camera (v4) still, and all the same options are there in the interface, settings, and even the hooks from Windows 10 Photos into Lumia Creative Studio (which hasn’t changed). Ditto shooting RAW (.DNG) files and sucking them out via cable with Windows Explorer, Nokia Photo Transfer or similar.

It’s business as usual!

What happens if I use (Windows) Camera instead? Is snapping much faster?

This (Camera) does start fractionally quicker, though it’s still three seconds before the viewfinder is fully live, so there’s no significant gain. And, probably due to debug code still in place, there’s a noticeable shutter lag at present on the Lumia 1020. PLUS, it always capture at the maximum resolution of the sensor – and I suspect that you don’t really want to be snapping 10MB 34MP images all day long, so you can discount this application for the 1020.

The big misconception was that a next generation camera application would somehow speed up the 1020 camera dramatically, but (short of a low resolution scrape of the sensor) the bottleneck is still grabbing 38MP worth of data and then saving it. So you’ll have to live with the 1020’s (lack of) speed and, as usual, console yourself with quality!

1Shot

1Shot in action, just zoom to whatever resolution you want, it’s a lossless way of working and rather interesting!

Will Lumia Camera stay available throughout the 1020’s life and Windows 10 Mobile?

Admittedly this app has disappeared a few times in the past year in the Store for some devices, but these have only been temporary lapses – there’s no reason to suspect that it needs to be withdrawn for any reason in the long term. And even if it did (get withdrawn), ‘Nokia Camera’ is still part of the firmware builds provisioned for the 1020, so you’d always have this to fall back on, with much the same functionality.

And even if the above wasn’t enough for you, other third party camera applications continue to work well under Windows 10 Mobile – I’ve been testing 1Shot and ProShot, but I’m sure the multitude of (less serious) camera apps will work fine too.

ProShot

ProShot in action, here set to capture at 12MP, one of its many modes….

What about video capture? And what’s all this about ‘Digital Stabilisation’?

There’s an odd setting in the simplified pane in (Windows) Camera for Windows 10 Mobile – a toggle for ‘digital stabilisation’. Which seems somewhat unnecessary given the massive, famous ball-bearing OIS integrated into the 1020 camera. My guess is that this is intended to help on the budget smartphones which lack OIS and that it should be hidden when the application is run on more capable devices.

Windows Camera

Some of the few settings in (Windows) Camera…

However, never one to rely on a guess when I could be testing it for real, I pointed my test 1020 out the window and ‘zoomed’ in on detail in a house about 200m away, looking at the stability under both applications:

From what I see above, the ‘digital stabilisation’ setting does nothing whatsoever on the 1020 – which is what I’d want, since OIS is going to be superior and you wouldn’t want two stabilisation systems ‘fighting each other’… Phew!

Other factors

So the bottom line for imaging is that nothing will really change. Of course, Windows 10 Mobile as an interface and OS has improvements galore, but mainly for the higher resolution screened phones and the newer chipsets. On the Lumia 1020, the OS is a bit of a ‘curate’s egg’ at the moment – but I suspect that optimisations for the 720p and 768p screens (and lower) are next on Microsoft’s agenda, so I’ll keep this 1020 up to date and report back.

There are no major showstoppers to anyone else upgrading to the Windows 10 Mobile Insider build on the 1020, but equally there’s little reason to do so in the first place. If I were you I’d wait for the official over-the-air ‘preserving all your apps and settings’ update in September or October.

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All About Windows Phone

Where does Denim and the new Lumia Camera leave the 1020?

Published by at 14:43 UTC, September 8th 2014

We’ve heard a lot about PureView imaging, a new, faster Lumia Camera application, Moment Capture, Dynamic Flash and Rich Capture, buzzwords aplenty over the last few days at IFA 2014. And the mix of all of this in the upcoming ultra-slim Lumia 830 does looks very tempting. But I thought a few words about what will and what won’t happen to the existing imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020, might be in order.

The story so far:

  • 2012: The Nokia 808 PureView is launched, with a huge 1/1.2″ hardware-accelerated 41MP oversampling camera, with shot to shot times a fraction of a second. Imaging is very well respected, there’s Xenon flash too, but it’s the tail end of the ever-less-supported Symbian OS and ecosystem.

    1020 and 808
      

  • 2013: The Nokia Lumia 1020 is launched, with a slightly smaller 1/1.5″ sensored 41MP camera, implementing much the same algorithms (plus the ability to reframe from the full image later) but handled by the phone’s main processor, resulting in shot to shot times as high as four seconds. There’s Xenon flash again, though(!), plus OIS, which helps. Again, the 1020 is at the tail end of a platform, this time the Snapdragon S4 range within Windows Phone, resulting in generally slow performance even when not in the main camera application.
      
  • end-2013/start 2014: The Lumia 1520, then Lumia Icon and 930 were launched, with a 1/2.5″ 21MP sensor that has similar functionality to the 1020 but with the next-gen Snapdragons powering the image processing and only half as much image data to handle at a time, resulting in shot to shot times of just less than one second. OIS, but only LED flash though.

The smartphone imaging fan in me, at this point, wanted to see Nokia – or rather Microsoft these days – attempt to reimagine the 1020, updating it with a Snapdragon 800 or 801, and bringing shot to shot times down to around a second (just my estimate). With the Xenon flash, the PureView zoom, the high end oversampling, plus the new chipset meaning that Windows Phone itself didn’t behave too badly, we’d have something of an outright winner.

Alas no. While it’s possible that such a device – say, the mythical Lumia 1030 – might be released, looking at the tea leaves in the mobile industry (the top Android smartphones and the iPhone have moved to computational photography, taking multiple shots very fast and then doing clever things with them) I’d say that this is now very unlikely, especially with Microsoft in charge and less scope for Finnish quirky extravagance.

  • September 2014: Microsoft launches the Nokia Lumia 830, with 10MP ‘PureView’ camera that has OIS but only a small 1/3.4″ sensor and no oversampling at all. The key benefits here are supposed to be the ‘Dynamic flash’ (achieved through taking a shot without LED flash and then very quickly taking another with) and ‘Rich capture’ (similarly, taking several shots at different exposures very quickly and then letting the user merge these as required).
    Lumia 830 back view

Leaving aside my worries that all these techniques (on the 830 and on other competing phones) utterly rely on the subject not moving at all (so a laughing or giggling subject would be blurred, etc.), the trend in the industry is clear – never mind the physics, make a camera that’s barely good enough but which is thin enough to fit in a phone only 8mm or so thick and then use burst mode techniques to let users get creative with the results.

Part of the ‘Denim’ platform update, the new ‘Lumia Camera’ application, according to Microsoft, is a revision of Nokia Camera (Lumia Camera was being called ‘Lumia Camera 5’ on the Microsoft demo stands, while the current Nokia Camera is up to v4.8) and enables:

  • shot to shot time of only a small fraction of a second
  • bursts of 4K or 2K video (depending on hardware) and then stripping out still ‘moments’ for use as photos
  • dynamic flash and rich capture functions, depending on whether the LED flash is enabled or not in the interface

Microsoft did say that the new application will be on the Lumia 830, hopefully at launch, plus will be coming to the 1520, Icon and 930 in due course. Now, the obvious question is what about all the relatively time consuming oversampling on the latter three devices. How can we have tiny shot to shot time when there are so many pixels to process? Is the oversampling being quietly forgotten?

It turns out (according to Juha, still on the imaging team and now at Microsoft) that the processors in the 1520, Icon and 930 are powerful enough that oversampling can be done in the background. On the 830, the shot is simply taken, encoded to JPG and stored in the background, while on the slightly older devices the shot gets taken and then UI immediately returned for the user to take another photo, while the quad core Snapdragon 800 chipset chugs away behind the scenes, performing the usual oversampling and encoding. 

With such a schema, Juha estimates that the 1520 (et al) will be capable of two to three shots per second. Not as fast as the likes of the HTC One devices, but still fast enough for almost all users. And yet with the oversampling still in place.

Lumia 1020 camera

So. What about the imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020? The Snapdragon S4 is significantly less powerful, plus there’s twice as much image data to handle and up to four times as much oversampling processing – this is the reason why the new Lumia Camera functions won’t be available for the 1020 – there’s not enough oomph available to do all the background processing required. Juha confirmed that ‘achieving smooth experience would be very difficult’. To say the least.

There’s little point then, in complaining about the speed of the 1020 camera or that Lumia Camera/Denim’s functions won’t be backported. If you must have the 41MP sensor and Xenon and speed then the old Nokia 808 is still available! If you can live without Xenon and oversampling then the new Lumia 830 looks like a good bet. If you want a good compromise, with some oversampling, good speed and can live with LED flash, then the Lumia 930 is probably the best option. or the 1520 if you fancy veering into ‘phablet’ territory (the 1520 is a great device).

Having established that there’s little point in complaining – the 1020, based on a 2012 chipset, is limited by its own specs and physics – there’s an extra option, of course. Live with the 1020 as-is, producing nigh on perfect oversampled images, getting crisp Xenon-frozen social snaps, and so on. All it requires is a little patience in terms of startup and shot to shot time. It could be argued that it’s all about planning ahead?

As the Rolling Stones once sang, ‘you can’t always get what you want, but you might just get what you need’. Interpret that whichever way you want to and let us know if you’re going to stick with the 1020 or move on, in the comments below!

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: How To, Comment
 

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All About Windows Phone

Where does Denim and the new Lumia Camera leave the 1020?

Published by at 14:43 UTC, September 8th 2014

We’ve heard a lot about PureView imaging, a new, faster Lumia Camera application, Moment Capture, Dynamic Flash and Rich Capture, buzzwords aplenty over the last few days at IFA 2014. And the mix of all of this in the upcoming ultra-slim Lumia 830 does looks very tempting. But I thought a few words about what will and what won’t happen to the existing imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020, might be in order.

The story so far:

  • 2012: The Nokia 808 PureView is launched, with a huge 1/1.2″ hardware-accelerated 41MP oversampling camera, with shot to shot times a fraction of a second. Imaging is very well respected, there’s Xenon flash too, but it’s the tail end of the ever-less-supported Symbian OS and ecosystem.

    1020 and 808
      

  • 2013: The Nokia Lumia 1020 is launched, with a slightly smaller 1/1.5″ sensored 41MP camera, implementing much the same algorithms (plus the ability to reframe from the full image later) but handled by the phone’s main processor, resulting in shot to shot times as high as four seconds. There’s Xenon flash again, though(!), plus OIS, which helps. Again, the 1020 is at the tail end of a platform, this time the Snapdragon S4 range within Windows Phone, resulting in generally slow performance even when not in the main camera application.
      
  • end-2013/start 2014: The Lumia 1520, then Lumia Icon and 930 were launched, with a 1/2.5″ 21MP sensor that has similar functionality to the 1020 but with the next-gen Snapdragons powering the image processing and only half as much image data to handle at a time, resulting in shot to shot times of just less than one second. OIS, but only LED flash though.

The smartphone imaging fan in me, at this point, wanted to see Nokia – or rather Microsoft these days – attempt to reimagine the 1020, updating it with a Snapdragon 800 or 801, and bringing shot to shot times down to around a second (just my estimate). With the Xenon flash, the PureView zoom, the high end oversampling, plus the new chipset meaning that Windows Phone itself didn’t behave too badly, we’d have something of an outright winner.

Alas no. While it’s possible that such a device – say, the mythical Lumia 1030 – might be released, looking at the tea leaves in the mobile industry (the top Android smartphones and the iPhone have moved to computational photography, taking multiple shots very fast and then doing clever things with them) I’d say that this is now very unlikely, especially with Microsoft in charge and less scope for Finnish quirky extravagance.

  • September 2014: Microsoft launches the Nokia Lumia 830, with 10MP ‘PureView’ camera that has OIS but only a small 1/3.4″ sensor and no oversampling at all. The key benefits here are supposed to be the ‘Dynamic flash’ (achieved through taking a shot without LED flash and then very quickly taking another with) and ‘Rich capture’ (similarly, taking several shots at different exposures very quickly and then letting the user merge these as required).
    Lumia 830 back view

Leaving aside my worries that all these techniques (on the 830 and on other competing phones) utterly rely on the subject not moving at all (so a laughing or giggling subject would be blurred, etc.), the trend in the industry is clear – never mind the physics, make a camera that’s barely good enough but which is thin enough to fit in a phone only 8mm or so thick and then use burst mode techniques to let users get creative with the results.

Part of the ‘Denim’ platform update, the new ‘Lumia Camera’ application, according to Microsoft, is a revision of Nokia Camera (Lumia Camera was being called ‘Lumia Camera 5’ on the Microsoft demo stands, while the current Nokia Camera is up to v4.8) and enables:

  • shot to shot time of only a small fraction of a second
  • bursts of 4K or 2K video (depending on hardware) and then stripping out still ‘moments’ for use as photos
  • dynamic flash and rich capture functions, depending on whether the LED flash is enabled or not in the interface

Microsoft did say that the new application will be on the Lumia 830, hopefully at launch, plus will be coming to the 1520, Icon and 930 in due course. Now, the obvious question is what about all the relatively time consuming oversampling on the latter three devices. How can we have tiny shot to shot time when there are so many pixels to process? Is the oversampling being quietly forgotten?

It turns out (according to Juha, still on the imaging team and now at Microsoft) that the processors in the 1520, Icon and 930 are powerful enough that oversampling can be done in the background. On the 830, the shot is simply taken, encoded to JPG and stored in the background, while on the slightly older devices the shot gets taken and then UI immediately returned for the user to take another photo, while the quad core Snapdragon 800 chipset chugs away behind the scenes, performing the usual oversampling and encoding. 

With such a schema, Juha estimates that the 1520 (et al) will be capable of two to three shots per second. Not as fast as the likes of the HTC One devices, but still fast enough for almost all users. And yet with the oversampling still in place.

Lumia 1020 camera

So. What about the imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020? The Snapdragon S4 is significantly less powerful, plus there’s twice as much image data to handle and up to four times as much oversampling processing – this is the reason why the new Lumia Camera functions won’t be available for the 1020 – there’s not enough oomph available to do all the background processing required. Juha confirmed that ‘achieving smooth experience would be very difficult’. To say the least.

There’s little point then, in complaining about the speed of the 1020 camera or that Lumia Camera/Denim’s functions won’t be backported. If you must have the 41MP sensor and Xenon and speed then the old Nokia 808 is still available! If you can live without Xenon and oversampling then the new Lumia 830 looks like a good bet. If you want a good compromise, with some oversampling, good speed and can live with LED flash, then the Lumia 930 is probably the best option. or the 1520 if you fancy veering into ‘phablet’ territory (the 1520 is a great device).

Having established that there’s little point in complaining – the 1020, based on a 2012 chipset, is limited by its own specs and physics – there’s an extra option, of course. Live with the 1020 as-is, producing nigh on perfect oversampled images, getting crisp Xenon-frozen social snaps, and so on. All it requires is a little patience in terms of startup and shot to shot time. It could be argued that it’s all about planning ahead?

As the Rolling Stones once sang, ‘you can’t always get what you want, but you might just get what you need’. Interpret that whichever way you want to and let us know if you’re going to stick with the 1020 or move on, in the comments below!

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: How To, Comment
 

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All About Windows Phone

Where does Denim and the new Lumia Camera leave the 1020?

Published by at 14:43 UTC, September 8th 2014

We’ve heard a lot about PureView imaging, a new, faster Lumia Camera application, Moment Capture, Dynamic Flash and Rich Capture, buzzwords aplenty over the last few days at IFA 2014. And the mix of all of this in the upcoming ultra-slim Lumia 830 does looks very tempting. But I thought a few words about what will and what won’t happen to the existing imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020, might be in order.

The story so far:

  • 2012: The Nokia 808 PureView is launched, with a huge 1/1.2″ hardware-accelerated 41MP oversampling camera, with shot to shot times a fraction of a second. Imaging is very well respected, there’s Xenon flash too, but it’s the tail end of the ever-less-supported Symbian OS and ecosystem.

    1020 and 808
      

  • 2013: The Nokia Lumia 1020 is launched, with a slightly smaller 1/1.5″ sensored 41MP camera, implementing much the same algorithms (plus the ability to reframe from the full image later) but handled by the phone’s main processor, resulting in shot to shot times as high as four seconds. There’s Xenon flash again, though(!), plus OIS, which helps. Again, the 1020 is at the tail end of a platform, this time the Snapdragon S4 range within Windows Phone, resulting in generally slow performance even when not in the main camera application.
      
  • end-2013/start 2014: The Lumia 1520, then Lumia Icon and 930 were launched, with a 1/2.5″ 21MP sensor that has similar functionality to the 1020 but with the next-gen Snapdragons powering the image processing and only half as much image data to handle at a time, resulting in shot to shot times of just less than one second. OIS, but only LED flash though.

The smartphone imaging fan in me, at this point, wanted to see Nokia – or rather Microsoft these days – attempt to reimagine the 1020, updating it with a Snapdragon 800 or 801, and bringing shot to shot times down to around a second (just my estimate). With the Xenon flash, the PureView zoom, the high end oversampling, plus the new chipset meaning that Windows Phone itself didn’t behave too badly, we’d have something of an outright winner.

Alas no. While it’s possible that such a device – say, the mythical Lumia 1030 – might be released, looking at the tea leaves in the mobile industry (the top Android smartphones and the iPhone have moved to computational photography, taking multiple shots very fast and then doing clever things with them) I’d say that this is now very unlikely, especially with Microsoft in charge and less scope for Finnish quirky extravagance.

  • September 2014: Microsoft launches the Nokia Lumia 830, with 10MP ‘PureView’ camera that has OIS but only a small 1/3.4″ sensor and no oversampling at all. The key benefits here are supposed to be the ‘Dynamic flash’ (achieved through taking a shot without LED flash and then very quickly taking another with) and ‘Rich capture’ (similarly, taking several shots at different exposures very quickly and then letting the user merge these as required).
    Lumia 830 back view

Leaving aside my worries that all these techniques (on the 830 and on other competing phones) utterly rely on the subject not moving at all (so a laughing or giggling subject would be blurred, etc.), the trend in the industry is clear – never mind the physics, make a camera that’s barely good enough but which is thin enough to fit in a phone only 8mm or so thick and then use burst mode techniques to let users get creative with the results.

Part of the ‘Denim’ platform update, the new ‘Lumia Camera’ application, according to Microsoft, is a revision of Nokia Camera (Lumia Camera was being called ‘Lumia Camera 5’ on the Microsoft demo stands, while the current Nokia Camera is up to v4.8) and enables:

  • shot to shot time of only a small fraction of a second
  • bursts of 4K or 2K video (depending on hardware) and then stripping out still ‘moments’ for use as photos
  • dynamic flash and rich capture functions, depending on whether the LED flash is enabled or not in the interface

Microsoft did say that the new application will be on the Lumia 830, hopefully at launch, plus will be coming to the 1520, Icon and 930 in due course. Now, the obvious question is what about all the relatively time consuming oversampling on the latter three devices. How can we have tiny shot to shot time when there are so many pixels to process? Is the oversampling being quietly forgotten?

It turns out (according to Juha, still on the imaging team and now at Microsoft) that the processors in the 1520, Icon and 930 are powerful enough that oversampling can be done in the background. On the 830, the shot is simply taken, encoded to JPG and stored in the background, while on the slightly older devices the shot gets taken and then UI immediately returned for the user to take another photo, while the quad core Snapdragon 800 chipset chugs away behind the scenes, performing the usual oversampling and encoding. 

With such a schema, Juha estimates that the 1520 (et al) will be capable of two to three shots per second. Not as fast as the likes of the HTC One devices, but still fast enough for almost all users. And yet with the oversampling still in place.

Lumia 1020 camera

So. What about the imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020? The Snapdragon S4 is significantly less powerful, plus there’s twice as much image data to handle and up to four times as much oversampling processing – this is the reason why the new Lumia Camera functions won’t be available for the 1020 – there’s not enough oomph available to do all the background processing required. Juha confirmed that ‘achieving smooth experience would be very difficult’. To say the least.

There’s little point then, in complaining about the speed of the 1020 camera or that Lumia Camera/Denim’s functions won’t be backported. If you must have the 41MP sensor and Xenon and speed then the old Nokia 808 is still available! If you can live without Xenon and oversampling then the new Lumia 830 looks like a good bet. If you want a good compromise, with some oversampling, good speed and can live with LED flash, then the Lumia 930 is probably the best option. or the 1520 if you fancy veering into ‘phablet’ territory (the 1520 is a great device).

Having established that there’s little point in complaining – the 1020, based on a 2012 chipset, is limited by its own specs and physics – there’s an extra option, of course. Live with the 1020 as-is, producing nigh on perfect oversampled images, getting crisp Xenon-frozen social snaps, and so on. All it requires is a little patience in terms of startup and shot to shot time. It could be argued that it’s all about planning ahead?

As the Rolling Stones once sang, ‘you can’t always get what you want, but you might just get what you need’. Interpret that whichever way you want to and let us know if you’re going to stick with the 1020 or move on, in the comments below!

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
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AAWP Insight #106: Cyan 1020, Prestigio, WP8.1 Update 1

Published by at 19:12 UTC, August 13th 2014

In AAWP Insight #106, hosted by Steve and Rafe, we start by discussing the merits of using bedded-in devices, in the light of the recent release of Lumia Cyan for the Lumia 1020. We also cover the  Prestigio Multiphone 8500 DUO, the withdrawal of Skype for Windows Phone 7 devices, battery efficiency of various releases of Windows Phone, our favourite features of Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1, and the latest device rumours.

Download the MP3 file for this podcast (Size: 31.0MB)
Duration: 00:44:18

AAWP Insight Podcast Information

The AAWP Insight Podcast is an episodic audio show which features recordings from trade shows, opinion pieces and discussion.

You can subscribe to the podcast via RSS by using the buttons below:

RSS Zune iTunes

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Audio, AAWP Insight Podcast
 

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All About Windows Phone

AAWP Insight #106: Cyan 1020, Prestigio, WP8.1 Update 1

Published by at 19:12 UTC, August 13th 2014

In AAWP Insight #106, hosted by Steve and Rafe, we start by discussing the merits of using bedded-in devices, in the light of the recent release of Lumia Cyan for the Lumia 1020. We also cover the  Prestigio Multiphone 8500 DUO, the withdrawal of Skype for Windows Phone 7 devices, battery efficiency of various releases of Windows Phone, our favourite features of Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1, and the latest device rumours.

Download the MP3 file for this podcast (Size: 31.0MB)
Duration: 00:44:18

AAWP Insight Podcast Information

The AAWP Insight Podcast is an episodic audio show which features recordings from trade shows, opinion pieces and discussion.

You can subscribe to the podcast via RSS by using the buttons below:

RSS Zune iTunes

Filed: > >
Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Audio, AAWP Insight Podcast
 

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About us:

All About Windows Phone provides an independent source of news, reviews, apps and more to the Windows Phone ecosystem.

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All About Windows Phone

AAWP Insight #106: Cyan 1020, Prestigio, WP8.1 Update 1

Published by at 19:12 UTC, August 13th 2014

In AAWP Insight #106, hosted by Steve and Rafe, we start by discussing the merits of using bedded-in devices, in the light of the recent release of Lumia Cyan for the Lumia 1020. We also cover the  Prestigio Multiphone 8500 DUO, the withdrawal of Skype for Windows Phone 7 devices, battery efficiency of various releases of Windows Phone, our favourite features of Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1, and the latest device rumours.

Download the MP3 file for this podcast (Size: 31.0MB)
Duration: 00:44:18

AAWP Insight Podcast Information

The AAWP Insight Podcast is an episodic audio show which features recordings from trade shows, opinion pieces and discussion.

You can subscribe to the podcast via RSS by using the buttons below:

RSS Zune iTunes

Filed: > >
Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Audio, AAWP Insight Podcast
 

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About us:

All About Windows Phone provides an independent source of news, reviews, apps and more to the Windows Phone ecosystem.

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The future of the Lumia 1020 – another sidelined classic like the 808?

A little history

We saw this in action for Nokia’s N93 – the original ‘transformer’ Symbian phone that could look like a regular T9 clamshell or a consumer camcorder at will. It tested well amongst geeks and camera phone enthusiasts but made no mark whatsoever in the consumer marketplace of the time (2006). The best-selling N95 escaped the ‘camera-centric’ tag because it had so many other innovations, of course, the integrated GPS, the GPU, the high quality stereo speakers, and so on.

The we run forward to the Nokia N82, from 2007/2008, the first smartphone with a Xenon flash, very definitely a ‘camera phone’ first and foremost. And still a device with just about the brightest Xenon illumination in the world, even after 7 years. But, despite appearing in High Street shops, it didn’t sell in huge numbers.

Repeat the process with the N86, the first High Street smartphone with an 8MP camera and still unique in having variable aperture, the first to use intelligent digital zoom when capturing video and to use a digital microphone. So many innovations, yet the N86 also failed to set the sales charts alight, this time in 2009.

Nokia N86 camera

Next in line, the aluminium-bodied N8, at the end of 2010, with 12MP and Xenon flash and a, for the time, huge sensor. Sales started off well, using the new GPU-accelerated Symbian^3 platform, but then Nokia’s Stephen Elop (prematurely) shot Symbian down on stage at MWC 2011 as part of the demonstration of support for Microsoft and Windows Phone, and the N8 never recovered.

Finally, on the Symbian front, we had the all-conquering Nokia 808 PureView, the result of five years of R&D, learning lessons from all the devices above, offering what’s still (by far) the largest camera sensor in any phone, with 41MP sensor into which users could ‘zoom’, digitally, without losing light or quality, and with hardware oversampling producing noiseless, pure images at lower resolution by default. Released in spring 2012, a full year after Symbian’s execution, it’s clear that the only reason this still made it to market was that so much work had already been done on the hardware and it would have been criminal to not at least shown it off to the world. At least, not without a Windows Phone version ready, something which was still a year away. As a result, in the world of 2012, with Symbian’s 360p screens seeming blocky compared to WVGA and 720p and with Android really taking off at the high end, and with Symbian utterly frowned on within High Street shops, the Nokia 808 PureView remained something of a cult hit only.

Lumia 1020 and 808 PureView

If there’s a common thread in all the above, it’s the inescapable conclusion that it takes time to create a really good phone camera. The space, weight and power constraints place extreme pressures on designers and in each case, by the time the phone hit the market, the underlying hardware was nearing the end of its relevance in the wider smartphone world. For example, the N82 was a full year after the N95 which had essentially the same internals, the N86 was a device and form factor from a bygone age even when launched, the N8 was legendarily delayed by up to a year, the 808 was borne into a completely hostile future.

And the same pattern applies to the Nokia Lumia 1020, headlined above. With ostensibly almost identical specifications to the mass market Lumia 920, it lagged the latter by almost a year. So, when eventually available, the chipset and internals were already nearing end-of-life, in terms of use in new devices. Again, the delay was almost certainly down to getting the camera working satisfactorily – again 41MP, like the 808, but this time doing everything in the main processor and an extra GB of RAM. The 1020 was well received by camera phone enthusiasts, and remains a benchmark device, though its shot to shot times are looking a little prehistoric in a world of 2.5GHz processors and monster GPUs.

Specs and the future

What, then, does the future hold for the Lumia 1020? There’s no doubting that it fared better, in terms of sales, than its Xenon-equipped, large-sensored 41MP ancestor, the Nokia 808, but with quite a few new software releases from Nokia/Microsoft explicitly saying that they’re only for the Lumia 1520 and 930, worries are starting to creep in for 1020 fans.

Let’s look at the hardware across the Nokia’s (now Microsoft’s) Windows Phone range:

Chipset Devices Specification
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 520, 521, 620, 720 Dual-core 1GHz Krait, Adreno 305, 512MB RAM
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 625 Dual-core 1.2GHz Krait 200, Adreno 305, LTE, 512MB RAM
Snapdragon 400 Lumia 630, 635 (etc) Quad-core 1.2 GHz Cortex-A7, Adreno 305, 512MB RAM
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 820, 920, 925, 928 Dual-core 1.5GHz Krait, Adreno 225, LTE, 1GB RAM
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 1020 Dual-core 1.5GHz Krait, Adreno 225, LTE, 2GB RAM
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 1320 Dual-core 1.7GHz Krait 300, Adreno 305, LTE, 1GB RAM
Snapdragon 800 Lumia 1520, 930 Quad-core 2.2GHz Krait 400, Adreno 330, LTE, 2GB RAM

The Lumia 1020 does stand out a little, amidst its peers, by having the extra Gigabyte of RAM, needed to handle the processing of the (up to) 38MP full resolution bitmaps internally, but the RAM will hopefully come in handy in helping ensure that the 1020 is less likely to be left behind when it comes time to update the Windows Phone platform again.

So far we’re seeing no device left behind by Microsoft, thanks in part to Windows Phone’s comparatively low hardware requirements – most of the work is in finishing code, adding functions  and fixing issues and compatibility, all without adding much to ‘bloat’. As a result, even the lowest Lumia 520 is getting the full Windows Phone 8.1, though some of the higher end camera-related functions are starting to come with some hardware requirements. Historically this has been done according to RAM, though with 2GB on board the Lumia 1020 should be good in this regard for another year or two at least.

Processor and GPU speed are more of an issue, with the latest features in Nokia Camera/Storyteller being limited to just the Lumia 1520 and 930 – at least in theory. ‘Living Images’ worked pretty well under the original Nokia Camera Betas on the 1020, so maybe these can be worked in again, in an update?

Certainly Nokia seems to have standardised on a ‘good enough’ 20MP cut down version of the PureView technology. Which is fair enough – and results are good – but it doesn’t stop the cameraphone geek in me wanting a third in the 41MP series. Is it just me?

OS updates

What of the core OS though – at what point will Microsoft start lopping off device compatibility? Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1, rumoured to roll out to developers for early testing later this month (July), for eventual release over the air to consumers in November/December, is supposed to be a fairly minor update (by comparison to 8.0 to 8.1) and should also be available for all devices. 

Windows Phone 8.1 Update 2 is scheduled to be available for testing around the end of 2014 and is likely to include new features to support new hardware, and I’d expect much of the lower end of the current Lumia range to get this update but not the full feature set. 

Whatever comes after that is pure conjecture (Google ‘Threshold’ if you want more on the rumours) and depends very much on Microsoft’s ongoing plans to unify its platforms, but it’s a fair bet that Windows Phone 8.2 (or Windows Phone 9, or whatever it ends up being called) will be optimised for the Snapdragon 800 and higher. Will the Lumia 1020 be updated for this release? My guess is ‘no’, but with the extra RAM, who knows? It might go down to the wire and depend on how many 1020-owning enthusiasts there are in early 2015 at Microsoft!

Of course, it’s not all about the operating system and there are other ways for a classic smartphone to get sidelined. It happened to the Nokia 808 and it’s happening now to the Lumia 1020. First, sales of the device stop – it becomes harder and harder to find one for sale – perhaps to replace a broken or stolen device? And accessories become harder to find – in the 1020’s case there’s the Qi charging back shell and Camera grip. If you have a 1020 and want either of these, then you’ve probably already put things off too long. [In the 808’s case it was mainly the BV-4D battery, original replacements for this were/are like gold dust.]

Lumia 1020 in Camera Grip

So – the Lumia 1020 stands a chance of being updated for longer than its older sister devices, the 920 and 925 – but only a slender one. Having said that, the 1020 will, by the time WP9/Threshold/whatever hits, be two years old and will have enjoyed updates freely throughout that time, adding significant extra general functionality that certainly wasn’t there when customer bought the device.

Classic of tech engineering

The Lumia 1020, like the 808 before it, still has unique selling points (in terms of photo quality, reframing/zooming flexibility and low light shots of people), and it seems that we still have at least another year of updates ahead. So celebrate the 1020 and don’t give up on it. 

And don’t you dare sell the Lumia 1020. Those who sold on the Nokia 808 PureView have bitterly regretted it – these devices are classic of modern tech engineering.

1020 and 808, all in white!!


All About Windows Phone

The future of the Lumia 1020 – another sidelined classic like the 808?

A little history

We saw this in action for Nokia’s N93 – the original ‘transformer’ Symbian phone that could look like a regular T9 clamshell or a consumer camcorder at will. It tested well amongst geeks and camera phone enthusiasts but made no mark whatsoever in the consumer marketplace of the time (2006). The best-selling N95 escaped the ‘camera-centric’ tag because it had so many other innovations, of course, the integrated GPS, the GPU, the high quality stereo speakers, and so on.

The we run forward to the Nokia N82, from 2007/2008, the first smartphone with a Xenon flash, very definitely a ‘camera phone’ first and foremost. And still a device with just about the brightest Xenon illumination in the world, even after 7 years. But, despite appearing in High Street shops, it didn’t sell in huge numbers.

Repeat the process with the N86, the first High Street smartphone with an 8MP camera and still unique in having variable aperture, the first to use intelligent digital zoom when capturing video and to use a digital microphone. So many innovations, yet the N86 also failed to set the sales charts alight, this time in 2009.

Nokia N86 camera

Next in line, the aluminium-bodied N8, at the end of 2010, with 12MP and Xenon flash and a, for the time, huge sensor. Sales started off well, using the new GPU-accelerated Symbian^3 platform, but then Nokia’s Stephen Elop (prematurely) shot Symbian down on stage at MWC 2011 as part of the demonstration of support for Microsoft and Windows Phone, and the N8 never recovered.

Finally, on the Symbian front, we had the all-conquering Nokia 808 PureView, the result of five years of R&D, learning lessons from all the devices above, offering what’s still (by far) the largest camera sensor in any phone, with 41MP sensor into which users could ‘zoom’, digitally, without losing light or quality, and with hardware oversampling producing noiseless, pure images at lower resolution by default. Released in spring 2012, a full year after Symbian’s execution, it’s clear that the only reason this still made it to market was that so much work had already been done on the hardware and it would have been criminal to not at least shown it off to the world. At least, not without a Windows Phone version ready, something which was still a year away. As a result, in the world of 2012, with Symbian’s 360p screens seeming blocky compared to WVGA and 720p and with Android really taking off at the high end, and with Symbian utterly frowned on within High Street shops, the Nokia 808 PureView remained something of a cult hit only.

Lumia 1020 and 808 PureView

If there’s a common thread in all the above, it’s the inescapable conclusion that it takes time to create a really good phone camera. The space, weight and power constraints place extreme pressures on designers and in each case, by the time the phone hit the market, the underlying hardware was nearing the end of its relevance in the wider smartphone world. For example, the N82 was a full year after the N95 which had essentially the same internals, the N86 was a device and form factor from a bygone age even when launched, the N8 was legendarily delayed by up to a year, the 808 was borne into a completely hostile future.

And the same pattern applies to the Nokia Lumia 1020, headlined above. With ostensibly almost identical specifications to the mass market Lumia 920, it lagged the latter by almost a year. So, when eventually available, the chipset and internals were already nearing end-of-life, in terms of use in new devices. Again, the delay was almost certainly down to getting the camera working satisfactorily – again 41MP, like the 808, but this time doing everything in the main processor and an extra GB of RAM. The 1020 was well received by camera phone enthusiasts, and remains a benchmark device, though its shot to shot times are looking a little prehistoric in a world of 2.5GHz processors and monster GPUs.

Specs and the future

What, then, does the future hold for the Lumia 1020? There’s no doubting that it fared better, in terms of sales, than its Xenon-equipped, large-sensored 41MP ancestor, the Nokia 808, but with quite a few new software releases from Nokia/Microsoft explicitly saying that they’re only for the Lumia 1520 and 930, worries are starting to creep in for 1020 fans.

Let’s look at the hardware across the Nokia’s (now Microsoft’s) Windows Phone range:

Chipset Devices Specification
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 520, 521, 620, 720 Dual-core 1GHz Krait, Adreno 305, 512MB RAM
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 625 Dual-core 1.2GHz Krait 200, Adreno 305, LTE, 512MB RAM
Snapdragon 400 Lumia 630, 635 (etc) Quad-core 1.2 GHz Cortex-A7, Adreno 305, 512MB RAM
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 820, 920, 925, 928 Dual-core 1.5GHz Krait, Adreno 225, LTE, 1GB RAM
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 1020 Dual-core 1.5GHz Krait, Adreno 225, LTE, 2GB RAM
Snapdragon S4 Lumia 1320 Dual-core 1.7GHz Krait 300, Adreno 305, LTE, 1GB RAM
Snapdragon 800 Lumia 1520, 930 Quad-core 2.2GHz Krait 400, Adreno 330, LTE, 2GB RAM

The Lumia 1020 does stand out a little, amidst its peers, by having the extra Gigabyte of RAM, needed to handle the processing of the (up to) 38MP full resolution bitmaps internally, but the RAM will hopefully come in handy in helping ensure that the 1020 is less likely to be left behind when it comes time to update the Windows Phone platform again.

So far we’re seeing no device left behind by Microsoft, thanks in part to Windows Phone’s comparatively low hardware requirements – most of the work is in finishing code, adding functions  and fixing issues and compatibility, all without adding much to ‘bloat’. As a result, even the lowest Lumia 520 is getting the full Windows Phone 8.1, though some of the higher end camera-related functions are starting to come with some hardware requirements. Historically this has been done according to RAM, though with 2GB on board the Lumia 1020 should be good in this regard for another year or two at least.

Processor and GPU speed are more of an issue, with the latest features in Nokia Camera/Storyteller being limited to just the Lumia 1520 and 930 – at least in theory. ‘Living Images’ worked pretty well under the original Nokia Camera Betas on the 1020, so maybe these can be worked in again, in an update?

Certainly Nokia seems to have standardised on a ‘good enough’ 20MP cut down version of the PureView technology. Which is fair enough – and results are good – but it doesn’t stop the cameraphone geek in me wanting a third in the 41MP series. Is it just me?

OS updates

What of the core OS though – at what point will Microsoft start lopping off device compatibility? Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1, rumoured to roll out to developers for early testing later this month (July), for eventual release over the air to consumers in November/December, is supposed to be a fairly minor update (by comparison to 8.0 to 8.1) and should also be available for all devices. 

Windows Phone 8.1 Update 2 is scheduled to be available for testing around the end of 2014 and is likely to include new features to support new hardware, and I’d expect much of the lower end of the current Lumia range to get this update but not the full feature set. 

Whatever comes after that is pure conjecture (Google ‘Threshold’ if you want more on the rumours) and depends very much on Microsoft’s ongoing plans to unify its platforms, but it’s a fair bet that Windows Phone 8.2 (or Windows Phone 9, or whatever it ends up being called) will be optimised for the Snapdragon 800 and higher. Will the Lumia 1020 be updated for this release? My guess is ‘no’, but with the extra RAM, who knows? It might go down to the wire and depend on how many 1020-owning enthusiasts there are in early 2015 at Microsoft!

Of course, it’s not all about the operating system and there are other ways for a classic smartphone to get sidelined. It happened to the Nokia 808 and it’s happening now to the Lumia 1020. First, sales of the device stop – it becomes harder and harder to find one for sale – perhaps to replace a broken or stolen device? And accessories become harder to find – in the 1020’s case there’s the Qi charging back shell and Camera grip. If you have a 1020 and want either of these, then you’ve probably already put things off too long. [In the 808’s case it was mainly the BV-4D battery, original replacements for this were/are like gold dust.]

Lumia 1020 in Camera Grip

So – the Lumia 1020 stands a chance of being updated for longer than its older sister devices, the 920 and 925 – but only a slender one. Having said that, the 1020 will, by the time WP9/Threshold/whatever hits, be two years old and will have enjoyed updates freely throughout that time, adding significant extra general functionality that certainly wasn’t there when customer bought the device.

Classic of tech engineering

The Lumia 1020, like the 808 before it, still has unique selling points (in terms of photo quality, reframing/zooming flexibility and low light shots of people), and it seems that we still have at least another year of updates ahead. So celebrate the 1020 and don’t give up on it. 

And don’t you dare sell the Lumia 1020. Those who sold on the Nokia 808 PureView have bitterly regretted it – these devices are classic of modern tech engineering.

1020 and 808, all in white!!


All About Windows Phone

Living Images not coming to the Nokia Lumia 1020 because of stability issues

Published by at 13:30 UTC, July 2nd 2014

Despite working after a fashion in Nokia Camera Beta, Living Images won’t officially be supported on the Nokia Lumia 1020 when Cyan rolls out, it transpires (from a reliable source), because of ‘stability’ issues. Which, when you think about it, is perhaps understandable…

The idea behind Living Images, last mentioned in the context of Nokia Camera beta here, is that images are constantly saved into RAM while focussing and taking a shot, and a short video is then composed and added before the final photo in the Photos gallery on Windows Phones. So, when flicking through photos, each comes to a life for a fraction of a second before settling on the eventual shot. It’s a great idea.

The concept does depend on the image processing being practical though, and the Lumia 1020’s slower processor and larger camera array means that there are clearly technical challenges to getting the Living Images working on this older (albeit with higher raw quality) hardware. Nokia seems to have tested Living Images in Photos on the 1020 and decreed that it’s too marginal and unreliable for mass market rollout.

The Lumia Icon, 1520 and 930 all have much faster chipsets and smaller image pipelines, making features such as continuous auto-focus, ultra fast burst modes and, yes, Living Image support fully practical. I’ll continue to monitor the progress of the technology on the editorial Lumia 1520 and will report back.

In the meantime, Lumia 1020 owners shouldn’t feel too miffed. The whole point of the 1020 was to get photos with absolute quality, not to get lost in interactive ‘gimmicks’ (and I use the term here with affection!) like Living Images!

Of interest, from our earlier stories:

Live “Living Images” can be viewed in Windows Phone’s standard camera roll, as shown in the embedded video, but can also be exported to Facebook and other social networking sites. Living images will also be created automatically when capturing photos using Nokia’s Cinemagraph and Refocus will also appear as “Living Images”, and will also be “bought to life” in the camera roll.

Source / Credit: Twitter

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Apps, Hardware
 

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