Tag Archives: apps

Multi-platform event – Apps World moves London venue

Relocates from Earls Court to ExCel for 2014

lines’ idezawa will be key speaker

In its fifth year, Apps World Europe is changing venues from London’s Earls Court exhibition centre to the high tech ExCel venue in the UK capital’s trendy Docksland area. Regular GoMo News readers will recall how one of the first apps shows in Britain – Symbian World used to be held in ExCel. By contrast, of course, Apps World prides itself in being the leading global multi-platform event in the mobile industry with annual shows held in San Francisco as well as London. Next year [2015] will see the first Apps World Germany to be held in Berlin, too.

Due to attract more than 12,000 attendees for 2014, there is a list of over 200 major speakers who will be presenting at Apps World Europe in ExCel.

Keynotes include As Seen on TV founder, entrepreneur and investor and now Shark Tank judge (the US equivalent of Dragon’s Den) Kevin Harrington.

He’s the man also credited with creating the first infomercial back in 1984.

Another famous TV face includes Jason Bradbury, presenter of The Gadget Show UK & USA (TV) whose television career spans nearly 20 years.

Other keynotes include Peter Molyneux, founder of Lionhead Studios and one of the most recognised faces in the video games industry.

Also making an appearance are Sir Nigel Shadbolt, co-Founder & chairman of ODI [Open Data Institute] whose 33 year career saw him made a British Knight in 2013.

Another speaker is Gerard Grech, CEO of Tech City UKwhose international experience has taken him now to new heights building Tech City UK.

Well worth a mention too are Takeshi Idezawa, COO with LINE – the world leading IM [Instant Messaging] service created in Japan and Bill Liao, European venture partner with venture capital business SOSVentures.

Tony is currently Editor of GoMobile News. He’s a veteran telecoms journalist who has previously worked for major printed and online titles. Follow him on Twitter @GoMoTweet.


GoMo News

Who’s writing apps for the iWatch?

At this point, it’s looking pretty likely that Apple will have iWatch news for us at its Tuesday event, regardless of whether or not the wearable is due for an immediate retail release (and things have been leaning towards “not”). Assuming that we do indeed get to this see new smartwatch, what software will be running on it? Not Apple code – that’s obvious – but what of third-party support? After all, we critique these existing wearable platforms based on their app selections, so surely we’ll be looking at Apple’s in the same light, and so far there hasn’t been a lot of talk about apps. A new report attempts to explain just why that might be, claiming that some third-party devs are indeed working on iWatch software, but that they’ve only very recently had access to the iWatch SDK.

Apple has made iOS 8 itself available to developers since late spring, and even though this is the release that will herald us into the age of the Apple wearable, the builds we’ve seen so far haven’t been focused so much on such devices. Instead, Apple has supposedly been cherry-picking a select group of high-profile devs for early iWatch SDK access, all under heavy NDA.

Like who? Facebook’s the only name that’s been specifically mentioned, so imagine other companies of its ilk: Twitter, Snapchat maybe?

Once the cat’s out of the bag, Apple might then start making the iWatch SDK more broadly available, in hopes of bulking-up the iWatch app selection in anticipation of the start of sales early next year.

Source: 9to5 Mac


Pocketnow

Mobile apps must make privacy a priority survey reveals

Press release

August 29th 2014. Four out of ten mobile users admit they would not download an app just because of privacy concerns, according to the findings of a new survey, while a third believe apps are getting more and more invasive. The new poll from Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, shows that the public attitude is hardening against apps that place excessive demands on users. The survey of 100 mobile users – including owners of Android, iOS, Windows Mobile and BlackBerry devices – was commissioned to examine how opinions are changing towards downloading apps in the wake of issues such as the Edward Snowden revelations.

When asked which statements they agreed with, 37 per cent of respondents said they would not download an app if it meant: – letting it post on social media on their behalf; operating their phone without them knowing; collecting their personal data; or invading their privacy.

By contrast, just 12 per cent said they would not be put off downloading an app for these reasons.

Meanwhile, 32 per cent felt apps were getting more invasive by, for example: – posting updates on sites like Facebook and Twitter; interacting with phones independently; compiling data on users; or taking liberties with personal privacy.

A mere 6 per felt apps were getting less invasive.In addition, the survey sheds light on how mobile users are now discovering apps.

When asked “How do you mostly find new apps to download?”, the most popular answer was searching an app store for a particular type of app (40 per cent), followed by hearing about apps from friends, colleagues and/or family (19 per cent), and lists of top apps and/or app charts (15 per cent).

The less popular responses were reviews and/or news articles about apps (13 per cent), hearing about apps from other users on social media (9 per cent), and adverts on TV or online (4 per cent).

Lastly, it would appear that users are increasingly turning to apps to complete practical tasks rather than for entertainment.

Approximately 42 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement that “I mostly download apps that help me complete a task in my personal or professional life – for example, banking apps, currency converters or reading apps.”

By way of comparison, 37 per cent agreed with the statement that “I mostly download games and novelty apps – for example, puzzles, games and voice changers.”

Howard Simms, co-founder and director at Apadmi, said, “This research shows that marketing mobile apps is becoming harder than ever. Mobile users are getting more and more concerned about how their data is being used.”

He continued, “The fact that four out of ten mobile users say they would not download an app solely because of privacy concerns should serve as a wake-up call to organisations building their own apps, app developers and mobile marketers.”

“It’s interesting that today’s mobile users are relying on app store listings and word-of-mouth recommendations when choosing apps rather than reviews, news articles and adverts.”

“This suggests users are looking for apps that their friends are using rather than apps that are critically acclaimed.

“Also, apps are no longer being used mainly for novelty purposes. Modern mobile users are more likely to check their bank balance and read a work document on the move than they are to pass the time playing games,” Simms added.

Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, has worked with a number of high-profile brands in recent years including the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

About Apadmi

Apadmi is the UK’s leading mobile app developer and ranks within the top 10 app developers globally. 1 From the BBC iPlayer Radio app to the Guardian Witness, Apadmi focuses on strengthening brand advocacy and engagement for its clients through the development of robust, intuitive and award-winning mobile apps and server solutions in both the consumer and enterprise space. Known as the experts in mobile technology, Apadmi prides itself on partnering with a whole host of world-renowned companies to improve and broaden their mobile portfolio such as the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

Notes

1. According to the Top 10 Enterprise App Developers globally as listed by Washington DC IT research firm, SourcingLine.


GoMo News

Mobile apps must make privacy a priority survey reveals

Press release

August 29th 2014. Four out of ten mobile users admit they would not download an app just because of privacy concerns, according to the findings of a new survey, while a third believe apps are getting more and more invasive. The new poll from Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, shows that the public attitude is hardening against apps that place excessive demands on users. The survey of 100 mobile users – including owners of Android, iOS, Windows Mobile and BlackBerry devices – was commissioned to examine how opinions are changing towards downloading apps in the wake of issues such as the Edward Snowden revelations.

When asked which statements they agreed with, 37 per cent of respondents said they would not download an app if it meant: – letting it post on social media on their behalf; operating their phone without them knowing; collecting their personal data; or invading their privacy.

By contrast, just 12 per cent said they would not be put off downloading an app for these reasons.

Meanwhile, 32 per cent felt apps were getting more invasive by, for example: – posting updates on sites like Facebook and Twitter; interacting with phones independently; compiling data on users; or taking liberties with personal privacy.

A mere 6 per felt apps were getting less invasive.In addition, the survey sheds light on how mobile users are now discovering apps.

When asked “How do you mostly find new apps to download?”, the most popular answer was searching an app store for a particular type of app (40 per cent), followed by hearing about apps from friends, colleagues and/or family (19 per cent), and lists of top apps and/or app charts (15 per cent).

The less popular responses were reviews and/or news articles about apps (13 per cent), hearing about apps from other users on social media (9 per cent), and adverts on TV or online (4 per cent).

Lastly, it would appear that users are increasingly turning to apps to complete practical tasks rather than for entertainment.

Approximately 42 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement that “I mostly download apps that help me complete a task in my personal or professional life – for example, banking apps, currency converters or reading apps.”

By way of comparison, 37 per cent agreed with the statement that “I mostly download games and novelty apps – for example, puzzles, games and voice changers.”

Howard Simms, co-founder and director at Apadmi, said, “This research shows that marketing mobile apps is becoming harder than ever. Mobile users are getting more and more concerned about how their data is being used.”

He continued, “The fact that four out of ten mobile users say they would not download an app solely because of privacy concerns should serve as a wake-up call to organisations building their own apps, app developers and mobile marketers.”

“It’s interesting that today’s mobile users are relying on app store listings and word-of-mouth recommendations when choosing apps rather than reviews, news articles and adverts.”

“This suggests users are looking for apps that their friends are using rather than apps that are critically acclaimed.

“Also, apps are no longer being used mainly for novelty purposes. Modern mobile users are more likely to check their bank balance and read a work document on the move than they are to pass the time playing games,” Simms added.

Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, has worked with a number of high-profile brands in recent years including the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

About Apadmi

Apadmi is the UK’s leading mobile app developer and ranks within the top 10 app developers globally. 1 From the BBC iPlayer Radio app to the Guardian Witness, Apadmi focuses on strengthening brand advocacy and engagement for its clients through the development of robust, intuitive and award-winning mobile apps and server solutions in both the consumer and enterprise space. Known as the experts in mobile technology, Apadmi prides itself on partnering with a whole host of world-renowned companies to improve and broaden their mobile portfolio such as the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

Notes

1. According to the Top 10 Enterprise App Developers globally as listed by Washington DC IT research firm, SourcingLine.


GoMo News

Mobile apps must make privacy a priority survey reveals

Press release

August 29th 2014. Four out of ten mobile users admit they would not download an app just because of privacy concerns, according to the findings of a new survey, while a third believe apps are getting more and more invasive. The new poll from Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, shows that the public attitude is hardening against apps that place excessive demands on users. The survey of 100 mobile users – including owners of Android, iOS, Windows Mobile and BlackBerry devices – was commissioned to examine how opinions are changing towards downloading apps in the wake of issues such as the Edward Snowden revelations.

When asked which statements they agreed with, 37 per cent of respondents said they would not download an app if it meant: – letting it post on social media on their behalf; operating their phone without them knowing; collecting their personal data; or invading their privacy.

By contrast, just 12 per cent said they would not be put off downloading an app for these reasons.

Meanwhile, 32 per cent felt apps were getting more invasive by, for example: – posting updates on sites like Facebook and Twitter; interacting with phones independently; compiling data on users; or taking liberties with personal privacy.

A mere 6 per felt apps were getting less invasive.In addition, the survey sheds light on how mobile users are now discovering apps.

When asked “How do you mostly find new apps to download?”, the most popular answer was searching an app store for a particular type of app (40 per cent), followed by hearing about apps from friends, colleagues and/or family (19 per cent), and lists of top apps and/or app charts (15 per cent).

The less popular responses were reviews and/or news articles about apps (13 per cent), hearing about apps from other users on social media (9 per cent), and adverts on TV or online (4 per cent).

Lastly, it would appear that users are increasingly turning to apps to complete practical tasks rather than for entertainment.

Approximately 42 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement that “I mostly download apps that help me complete a task in my personal or professional life – for example, banking apps, currency converters or reading apps.”

By way of comparison, 37 per cent agreed with the statement that “I mostly download games and novelty apps – for example, puzzles, games and voice changers.”

Howard Simms, co-founder and director at Apadmi, said, “This research shows that marketing mobile apps is becoming harder than ever. Mobile users are getting more and more concerned about how their data is being used.”

He continued, “The fact that four out of ten mobile users say they would not download an app solely because of privacy concerns should serve as a wake-up call to organisations building their own apps, app developers and mobile marketers.”

“It’s interesting that today’s mobile users are relying on app store listings and word-of-mouth recommendations when choosing apps rather than reviews, news articles and adverts.”

“This suggests users are looking for apps that their friends are using rather than apps that are critically acclaimed.

“Also, apps are no longer being used mainly for novelty purposes. Modern mobile users are more likely to check their bank balance and read a work document on the move than they are to pass the time playing games,” Simms added.

Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, has worked with a number of high-profile brands in recent years including the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

About Apadmi

Apadmi is the UK’s leading mobile app developer and ranks within the top 10 app developers globally. 1 From the BBC iPlayer Radio app to the Guardian Witness, Apadmi focuses on strengthening brand advocacy and engagement for its clients through the development of robust, intuitive and award-winning mobile apps and server solutions in both the consumer and enterprise space. Known as the experts in mobile technology, Apadmi prides itself on partnering with a whole host of world-renowned companies to improve and broaden their mobile portfolio such as the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

Notes

1. According to the Top 10 Enterprise App Developers globally as listed by Washington DC IT research firm, SourcingLine.


GoMo News

Mobile apps must make privacy a priority survey reveals

Press release

August 29th 2014. Four out of ten mobile users admit they would not download an app just because of privacy concerns, according to the findings of a new survey, while a third believe apps are getting more and more invasive. The new poll from Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, shows that the public attitude is hardening against apps that place excessive demands on users. The survey of 100 mobile users – including owners of Android, iOS, Windows Mobile and BlackBerry devices – was commissioned to examine how opinions are changing towards downloading apps in the wake of issues such as the Edward Snowden revelations.

When asked which statements they agreed with, 37 per cent of respondents said they would not download an app if it meant: – letting it post on social media on their behalf; operating their phone without them knowing; collecting their personal data; or invading their privacy.

By contrast, just 12 per cent said they would not be put off downloading an app for these reasons.

Meanwhile, 32 per cent felt apps were getting more invasive by, for example: – posting updates on sites like Facebook and Twitter; interacting with phones independently; compiling data on users; or taking liberties with personal privacy.

A mere 6 per felt apps were getting less invasive.In addition, the survey sheds light on how mobile users are now discovering apps.

When asked “How do you mostly find new apps to download?”, the most popular answer was searching an app store for a particular type of app (40 per cent), followed by hearing about apps from friends, colleagues and/or family (19 per cent), and lists of top apps and/or app charts (15 per cent).

The less popular responses were reviews and/or news articles about apps (13 per cent), hearing about apps from other users on social media (9 per cent), and adverts on TV or online (4 per cent).

Lastly, it would appear that users are increasingly turning to apps to complete practical tasks rather than for entertainment.

Approximately 42 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement that “I mostly download apps that help me complete a task in my personal or professional life – for example, banking apps, currency converters or reading apps.”

By way of comparison, 37 per cent agreed with the statement that “I mostly download games and novelty apps – for example, puzzles, games and voice changers.”

Howard Simms, co-founder and director at Apadmi, said, “This research shows that marketing mobile apps is becoming harder than ever. Mobile users are getting more and more concerned about how their data is being used.”

He continued, “The fact that four out of ten mobile users say they would not download an app solely because of privacy concerns should serve as a wake-up call to organisations building their own apps, app developers and mobile marketers.”

“It’s interesting that today’s mobile users are relying on app store listings and word-of-mouth recommendations when choosing apps rather than reviews, news articles and adverts.”

“This suggests users are looking for apps that their friends are using rather than apps that are critically acclaimed.

“Also, apps are no longer being used mainly for novelty purposes. Modern mobile users are more likely to check their bank balance and read a work document on the move than they are to pass the time playing games,” Simms added.

Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, has worked with a number of high-profile brands in recent years including the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

About Apadmi

Apadmi is the UK’s leading mobile app developer and ranks within the top 10 app developers globally. 1 From the BBC iPlayer Radio app to the Guardian Witness, Apadmi focuses on strengthening brand advocacy and engagement for its clients through the development of robust, intuitive and award-winning mobile apps and server solutions in both the consumer and enterprise space. Known as the experts in mobile technology, Apadmi prides itself on partnering with a whole host of world-renowned companies to improve and broaden their mobile portfolio such as the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

Notes

1. According to the Top 10 Enterprise App Developers globally as listed by Washington DC IT research firm, SourcingLine.


GoMo News

Mobile apps must make privacy a priority survey reveals

Press release

August 29th 2014. Four out of ten mobile users admit they would not download an app just because of privacy concerns, according to the findings of a new survey, while a third believe apps are getting more and more invasive. The new poll from Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, shows that the public attitude is hardening against apps that place excessive demands on users. The survey of 100 mobile users – including owners of Android, iOS, Windows Mobile and BlackBerry devices – was commissioned to examine how opinions are changing towards downloading apps in the wake of issues such as the Edward Snowden revelations.

When asked which statements they agreed with, 37 per cent of respondents said they would not download an app if it meant: – letting it post on social media on their behalf; operating their phone without them knowing; collecting their personal data; or invading their privacy.

By contrast, just 12 per cent said they would not be put off downloading an app for these reasons.

Meanwhile, 32 per cent felt apps were getting more invasive by, for example: – posting updates on sites like Facebook and Twitter; interacting with phones independently; compiling data on users; or taking liberties with personal privacy.

A mere 6 per felt apps were getting less invasive.In addition, the survey sheds light on how mobile users are now discovering apps.

When asked “How do you mostly find new apps to download?”, the most popular answer was searching an app store for a particular type of app (40 per cent), followed by hearing about apps from friends, colleagues and/or family (19 per cent), and lists of top apps and/or app charts (15 per cent).

The less popular responses were reviews and/or news articles about apps (13 per cent), hearing about apps from other users on social media (9 per cent), and adverts on TV or online (4 per cent).

Lastly, it would appear that users are increasingly turning to apps to complete practical tasks rather than for entertainment.

Approximately 42 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement that “I mostly download apps that help me complete a task in my personal or professional life – for example, banking apps, currency converters or reading apps.”

By way of comparison, 37 per cent agreed with the statement that “I mostly download games and novelty apps – for example, puzzles, games and voice changers.”

Howard Simms, co-founder and director at Apadmi, said, “This research shows that marketing mobile apps is becoming harder than ever. Mobile users are getting more and more concerned about how their data is being used.”

He continued, “The fact that four out of ten mobile users say they would not download an app solely because of privacy concerns should serve as a wake-up call to organisations building their own apps, app developers and mobile marketers.”

“It’s interesting that today’s mobile users are relying on app store listings and word-of-mouth recommendations when choosing apps rather than reviews, news articles and adverts.”

“This suggests users are looking for apps that their friends are using rather than apps that are critically acclaimed.

“Also, apps are no longer being used mainly for novelty purposes. Modern mobile users are more likely to check their bank balance and read a work document on the move than they are to pass the time playing games,” Simms added.

Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, has worked with a number of high-profile brands in recent years including the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

About Apadmi

Apadmi is the UK’s leading mobile app developer and ranks within the top 10 app developers globally. 1 From the BBC iPlayer Radio app to the Guardian Witness, Apadmi focuses on strengthening brand advocacy and engagement for its clients through the development of robust, intuitive and award-winning mobile apps and server solutions in both the consumer and enterprise space. Known as the experts in mobile technology, Apadmi prides itself on partnering with a whole host of world-renowned companies to improve and broaden their mobile portfolio such as the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

Notes

1. According to the Top 10 Enterprise App Developers globally as listed by Washington DC IT research firm, SourcingLine.


GoMo News

Mobile apps must make privacy a priority survey reveals

Press release

August 29th 2014. Four out of ten mobile users admit they would not download an app just because of privacy concerns, according to the findings of a new survey, while a third believe apps are getting more and more invasive. The new poll from Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, shows that the public attitude is hardening against apps that place excessive demands on users. The survey of 100 mobile users – including owners of Android, iOS, Windows Mobile and BlackBerry devices – was commissioned to examine how opinions are changing towards downloading apps in the wake of issues such as the Edward Snowden revelations.

When asked which statements they agreed with, 37 per cent of respondents said they would not download an app if it meant: – letting it post on social media on their behalf; operating their phone without them knowing; collecting their personal data; or invading their privacy.

By contrast, just 12 per cent said they would not be put off downloading an app for these reasons.

Meanwhile, 32 per cent felt apps were getting more invasive by, for example: – posting updates on sites like Facebook and Twitter; interacting with phones independently; compiling data on users; or taking liberties with personal privacy.

A mere 6 per felt apps were getting less invasive.In addition, the survey sheds light on how mobile users are now discovering apps.

When asked “How do you mostly find new apps to download?”, the most popular answer was searching an app store for a particular type of app (40 per cent), followed by hearing about apps from friends, colleagues and/or family (19 per cent), and lists of top apps and/or app charts (15 per cent).

The less popular responses were reviews and/or news articles about apps (13 per cent), hearing about apps from other users on social media (9 per cent), and adverts on TV or online (4 per cent).

Lastly, it would appear that users are increasingly turning to apps to complete practical tasks rather than for entertainment.

Approximately 42 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement that “I mostly download apps that help me complete a task in my personal or professional life – for example, banking apps, currency converters or reading apps.”

By way of comparison, 37 per cent agreed with the statement that “I mostly download games and novelty apps – for example, puzzles, games and voice changers.”

Howard Simms, co-founder and director at Apadmi, said, “This research shows that marketing mobile apps is becoming harder than ever. Mobile users are getting more and more concerned about how their data is being used.”

He continued, “The fact that four out of ten mobile users say they would not download an app solely because of privacy concerns should serve as a wake-up call to organisations building their own apps, app developers and mobile marketers.”

“It’s interesting that today’s mobile users are relying on app store listings and word-of-mouth recommendations when choosing apps rather than reviews, news articles and adverts.”

“This suggests users are looking for apps that their friends are using rather than apps that are critically acclaimed.

“Also, apps are no longer being used mainly for novelty purposes. Modern mobile users are more likely to check their bank balance and read a work document on the move than they are to pass the time playing games,” Simms added.

Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, has worked with a number of high-profile brands in recent years including the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

About Apadmi

Apadmi is the UK’s leading mobile app developer and ranks within the top 10 app developers globally. 1 From the BBC iPlayer Radio app to the Guardian Witness, Apadmi focuses on strengthening brand advocacy and engagement for its clients through the development of robust, intuitive and award-winning mobile apps and server solutions in both the consumer and enterprise space. Known as the experts in mobile technology, Apadmi prides itself on partnering with a whole host of world-renowned companies to improve and broaden their mobile portfolio such as the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

Notes

1. According to the Top 10 Enterprise App Developers globally as listed by Washington DC IT research firm, SourcingLine.


GoMo News

Mobile apps must make privacy a priority survey reveals

Press release

August 29th 2014. Four out of ten mobile users admit they would not download an app just because of privacy concerns, according to the findings of a new survey, while a third believe apps are getting more and more invasive. The new poll from Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, shows that the public attitude is hardening against apps that place excessive demands on users. The survey of 100 mobile users – including owners of Android, iOS, Windows Mobile and BlackBerry devices – was commissioned to examine how opinions are changing towards downloading apps in the wake of issues such as the Edward Snowden revelations.

When asked which statements they agreed with, 37 per cent of respondents said they would not download an app if it meant: – letting it post on social media on their behalf; operating their phone without them knowing; collecting their personal data; or invading their privacy.

By contrast, just 12 per cent said they would not be put off downloading an app for these reasons.

Meanwhile, 32 per cent felt apps were getting more invasive by, for example: – posting updates on sites like Facebook and Twitter; interacting with phones independently; compiling data on users; or taking liberties with personal privacy.

A mere 6 per felt apps were getting less invasive.In addition, the survey sheds light on how mobile users are now discovering apps.

When asked “How do you mostly find new apps to download?”, the most popular answer was searching an app store for a particular type of app (40 per cent), followed by hearing about apps from friends, colleagues and/or family (19 per cent), and lists of top apps and/or app charts (15 per cent).

The less popular responses were reviews and/or news articles about apps (13 per cent), hearing about apps from other users on social media (9 per cent), and adverts on TV or online (4 per cent).

Lastly, it would appear that users are increasingly turning to apps to complete practical tasks rather than for entertainment.

Approximately 42 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement that “I mostly download apps that help me complete a task in my personal or professional life – for example, banking apps, currency converters or reading apps.”

By way of comparison, 37 per cent agreed with the statement that “I mostly download games and novelty apps – for example, puzzles, games and voice changers.”

Howard Simms, co-founder and director at Apadmi, said, “This research shows that marketing mobile apps is becoming harder than ever. Mobile users are getting more and more concerned about how their data is being used.”

He continued, “The fact that four out of ten mobile users say they would not download an app solely because of privacy concerns should serve as a wake-up call to organisations building their own apps, app developers and mobile marketers.”

“It’s interesting that today’s mobile users are relying on app store listings and word-of-mouth recommendations when choosing apps rather than reviews, news articles and adverts.”

“This suggests users are looking for apps that their friends are using rather than apps that are critically acclaimed.

“Also, apps are no longer being used mainly for novelty purposes. Modern mobile users are more likely to check their bank balance and read a work document on the move than they are to pass the time playing games,” Simms added.

Apadmi, the UK’s leading mobile app developer, has worked with a number of high-profile brands in recent years including the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

About Apadmi

Apadmi is the UK’s leading mobile app developer and ranks within the top 10 app developers globally. 1 From the BBC iPlayer Radio app to the Guardian Witness, Apadmi focuses on strengthening brand advocacy and engagement for its clients through the development of robust, intuitive and award-winning mobile apps and server solutions in both the consumer and enterprise space. Known as the experts in mobile technology, Apadmi prides itself on partnering with a whole host of world-renowned companies to improve and broaden their mobile portfolio such as the BBC, the X Factor, the Guardian, BT, Aviva, Skyscanner, EE, AstraZeneca and Lexus.

Notes

1. According to the Top 10 Enterprise App Developers globally as listed by Washington DC IT research firm, SourcingLine.


GoMo News

Five essential back to school apps for iOS (Video)

For many of you, the new school year is just beginning. Others have just a few days or weeks before they’re back in the classroom, as well.

Fortunately, the transition back into the school year doesn’t have to be so hard. Education and productivity applications are available in droves. There are literally hundreds of note taking applications, task list managers, calendar apps, and more. There are even applications where you can go to ask questions about your homework, or knowledge engines to reference, right from your phone.

If you’re after help inside or out of the classroom, we have a nice little helping of overpowered, extremely useful back to school apps for iOS! Watch the below video and tell us what your essential schooling apps are in the comments!


Pocketnow