Tag Archives: developer

The Elite Android Hacker Bundle: Lifetime access to developer mastery courses 92% off [Deal of the Day]

redesign_androidapps_mf

With its rapid proliferation and global popularity, most developers would be wise to add Android programming to their repertoire. Considering the time and financial constraints of everyday life, not everyone has access to the resources necessary to develop an expertise in the craft. The Elite Android Hacker Bundle steps in as the perfect solution for folks looking to create their own apps.

This bundle contains over 52 hours of tutelage curated from expert professors, studios, and academies. For most courses, you’ll simply need a browser that supports Java and an Android device. For only $ 39, you’ll receive specialist guidance through the creation process with certification upon completion.

Check this deal out, and many others at deals.androidguys.com!


AndroidGuys

Guest Post: 5 common problems every app developer faces

by Stefano Sassu, a vp with Ask Partner Network

App development has grown exponentially in the past few years, with new apps hitting the market every day. Such saturation means that developers are facing new and harder challenges throughout the development process. Here are my five common problems that app developers face and how to remedy them.

Poor adoption and download rates

A great app is nothing unless people are using it. Because of this, one of the most pressing challenges for developers is promoting their apps.

The following initiatives are best practices that all developers, from the highly-funded to independent, can utilize to push for high adoption rates: –

  • Have a web page promoting your app that is optimised for both desktop and mobile use
  • Utilise social media channels as free promotional tools
  • Boost your search rankings in the app store by creating a name and corresponding description that includes search terms
  • Include screenshots of key features of your app in the app store
  • Engage with multiple app stores to increase distribution and exposure

Lack of ad click-through rates & conversions

Another challenge for app developers is the ability to select the advertising format that is best suited to their app and engages their audiences.

A best practice is to test different ad formats, as well as ad networks, to see what performs the best.

Apps that are heavy in content, such as a news app, may benefit from using native, in-stream advertising where the ads blend in with the page content, while a game might be best suited for interstitials.

The other half consists of targeting the ads to your audience’s demographics and preferences. Work with your ad provider to ensure the ads they serve are best suited to your users.

User Experience Comes First

If developers must follow one rule, it should be – user experience comes first.

App developers should first perform research to determine who they want to target, what the audience expects and what their preferences are.

User testing is an important step because developers often think differently than consumers.

For example, the developer may want the navigation buttons on the left side of the screen, but after user testing, results may show that users prefer the navigation at the bottom of the screen.

By knowing their users, what they expect, and making sure the user experience comes first, developers are more likely to create a compelling app that will be used again and again.

Surviving unexpected growth

While creating ‘The next Angry Birds’ is every developer’s dream, there are challenges with growing too quickly.

Some challenges of going viral include weak company leadership, insufficient app infrastructure, an inability to support high volumes of users, and limitations with customer support.

Developers that are successful during expansion have shown that the following actions are essential:-

  • Have a clear understanding of your revenue model and how you plan to become profitable
  • Employ re-engagement tools to maintain users
  • Know the most effective channels for building an audience, and keep acquisition cost per user below revenue per user

Be honest on privacy policies

Privacy matters are a top concern for consumers, and app developers must be clear on how their apps are tracking information.

As part of this, developers must take the time to read and understand how any third parties they work with are collecting and using information, and what that means for the consumer.

As a best practice, all privacy policies and end-user license agreements should be presented and accepted before the app is installed on the device.

The increased saturation of the app marketplace means that successful developers need to be more marketing savvy, cater to user preferences and continuously innovate.

Though developers face several challenges along the app development journey, those who overcome these five challenges will have a clear advantage against competition and will be positioned for further growth and profitability in the future.

Author biog

Stefano Sassu, is vp for product development & marketing with Ask Partner Network. Stefano is a well respected leader in mobile entertainment who has built innovative businesses in the USA and Europe for over fifteen years. In this role he is responsible for overseeing the effort for all mobile initiatives, setting overall strategy, and maximising mobile search and advertising opportunities for the group. Prior to Ask Partner Network, Stefano held a Vice President Position at FOX Mobile Group, where he provided result-oriented product management for multiple entertainment brands while developing profit-driven mobile services and applications for FMG’s customers. Before joining FMG, Stefano started his career in the mobile space as Head of Product Development at Dada (acquired by NTT DoCoMo, a Japanese provider of mobile voice, data and multimedia services). He was responsible for the management of on-deck and off-deck partnerships with international mobile carriers, aggregators, OEMs, as well as media partners, overseeing all lines of operation and financial performance for the B2B division of the company.


GoMo News

Guest Post: 5 common problems every app developer faces

by Stefano Sassu, a vp with Ask Partner Network

App development has grown exponentially in the past few years, with new apps hitting the market every day. Such saturation means that developers are facing new and harder challenges throughout the development process. Here are my five common problems that app developers face and how to remedy them.

Poor adoption and download rates

A great app is nothing unless people are using it. Because of this, one of the most pressing challenges for developers is promoting their apps.

The following initiatives are best practices that all developers, from the highly-funded to independent, can utilize to push for high adoption rates: –

  • Have a web page promoting your app that is optimised for both desktop and mobile use
  • Utilise social media channels as free promotional tools
  • Boost your search rankings in the app store by creating a name and corresponding description that includes search terms
  • Include screenshots of key features of your app in the app store
  • Engage with multiple app stores to increase distribution and exposure

Lack of ad click-through rates & conversions

Another challenge for app developers is the ability to select the advertising format that is best suited to their app and engages their audiences.

A best practice is to test different ad formats, as well as ad networks, to see what performs the best.

Apps that are heavy in content, such as a news app, may benefit from using native, in-stream advertising where the ads blend in with the page content, while a game might be best suited for interstitials.

The other half consists of targeting the ads to your audience’s demographics and preferences. Work with your ad provider to ensure the ads they serve are best suited to your users.

User Experience Comes First

If developers must follow one rule, it should be – user experience comes first.

App developers should first perform research to determine who they want to target, what the audience expects and what their preferences are.

User testing is an important step because developers often think differently than consumers.

For example, the developer may want the navigation buttons on the left side of the screen, but after user testing, results may show that users prefer the navigation at the bottom of the screen.

By knowing their users, what they expect, and making sure the user experience comes first, developers are more likely to create a compelling app that will be used again and again.

Surviving unexpected growth

While creating ‘The next Angry Birds’ is every developer’s dream, there are challenges with growing too quickly.

Some challenges of going viral include weak company leadership, insufficient app infrastructure, an inability to support high volumes of users, and limitations with customer support.

Developers that are successful during expansion have shown that the following actions are essential:-

  • Have a clear understanding of your revenue model and how you plan to become profitable
  • Employ re-engagement tools to maintain users
  • Know the most effective channels for building an audience, and keep acquisition cost per user below revenue per user

Be honest on privacy policies

Privacy matters are a top concern for consumers, and app developers must be clear on how their apps are tracking information.

As part of this, developers must take the time to read and understand how any third parties they work with are collecting and using information, and what that means for the consumer.

As a best practice, all privacy policies and end-user license agreements should be presented and accepted before the app is installed on the device.

The increased saturation of the app marketplace means that successful developers need to be more marketing savvy, cater to user preferences and continuously innovate.

Though developers face several challenges along the app development journey, those who overcome these five challenges will have a clear advantage against competition and will be positioned for further growth and profitability in the future.

Author biog

Stefano Sassu, is vp for product development & marketing with Ask Partner Network. Stefano is a well respected leader in mobile entertainment who has built innovative businesses in the USA and Europe for over fifteen years. In this role he is responsible for overseeing the effort for all mobile initiatives, setting overall strategy, and maximising mobile search and advertising opportunities for the group. Prior to Ask Partner Network, Stefano held a Vice President Position at FOX Mobile Group, where he provided result-oriented product management for multiple entertainment brands while developing profit-driven mobile services and applications for FMG’s customers. Before joining FMG, Stefano started his career in the mobile space as Head of Product Development at Dada (acquired by NTT DoCoMo, a Japanese provider of mobile voice, data and multimedia services). He was responsible for the management of on-deck and off-deck partnerships with international mobile carriers, aggregators, OEMs, as well as media partners, overseeing all lines of operation and financial performance for the B2B division of the company.


GoMo News

Guest Post: 5 common problems every app developer faces

by Stefano Sassu, a vp with Ask Partner Network

App development has grown exponentially in the past few years, with new apps hitting the market every day. Such saturation means that developers are facing new and harder challenges throughout the development process. Here are my five common problems that app developers face and how to remedy them.

Poor adoption and download rates

A great app is nothing unless people are using it. Because of this, one of the most pressing challenges for developers is promoting their apps.

The following initiatives are best practices that all developers, from the highly-funded to independent, can utilize to push for high adoption rates: –

  • Have a web page promoting your app that is optimised for both desktop and mobile use
  • Utilise social media channels as free promotional tools
  • Boost your search rankings in the app store by creating a name and corresponding description that includes search terms
  • Include screenshots of key features of your app in the app store
  • Engage with multiple app stores to increase distribution and exposure

Lack of ad click-through rates & conversions

Another challenge for app developers is the ability to select the advertising format that is best suited to their app and engages their audiences.

A best practice is to test different ad formats, as well as ad networks, to see what performs the best.

Apps that are heavy in content, such as a news app, may benefit from using native, in-stream advertising where the ads blend in with the page content, while a game might be best suited for interstitials.

The other half consists of targeting the ads to your audience’s demographics and preferences. Work with your ad provider to ensure the ads they serve are best suited to your users.

User Experience Comes First

If developers must follow one rule, it should be – user experience comes first.

App developers should first perform research to determine who they want to target, what the audience expects and what their preferences are.

User testing is an important step because developers often think differently than consumers.

For example, the developer may want the navigation buttons on the left side of the screen, but after user testing, results may show that users prefer the navigation at the bottom of the screen.

By knowing their users, what they expect, and making sure the user experience comes first, developers are more likely to create a compelling app that will be used again and again.

Surviving unexpected growth

While creating ‘The next Angry Birds’ is every developer’s dream, there are challenges with growing too quickly.

Some challenges of going viral include weak company leadership, insufficient app infrastructure, an inability to support high volumes of users, and limitations with customer support.

Developers that are successful during expansion have shown that the following actions are essential:-

  • Have a clear understanding of your revenue model and how you plan to become profitable
  • Employ re-engagement tools to maintain users
  • Know the most effective channels for building an audience, and keep acquisition cost per user below revenue per user

Be honest on privacy policies

Privacy matters are a top concern for consumers, and app developers must be clear on how their apps are tracking information.

As part of this, developers must take the time to read and understand how any third parties they work with are collecting and using information, and what that means for the consumer.

As a best practice, all privacy policies and end-user license agreements should be presented and accepted before the app is installed on the device.

The increased saturation of the app marketplace means that successful developers need to be more marketing savvy, cater to user preferences and continuously innovate.

Though developers face several challenges along the app development journey, those who overcome these five challenges will have a clear advantage against competition and will be positioned for further growth and profitability in the future.

Author biog

Stefano Sassu, is vp for product development & marketing with Ask Partner Network. Stefano is a well respected leader in mobile entertainment who has built innovative businesses in the USA and Europe for over fifteen years. In this role he is responsible for overseeing the effort for all mobile initiatives, setting overall strategy, and maximising mobile search and advertising opportunities for the group. Prior to Ask Partner Network, Stefano held a Vice President Position at FOX Mobile Group, where he provided result-oriented product management for multiple entertainment brands while developing profit-driven mobile services and applications for FMG’s customers. Before joining FMG, Stefano started his career in the mobile space as Head of Product Development at Dada (acquired by NTT DoCoMo, a Japanese provider of mobile voice, data and multimedia services). He was responsible for the management of on-deck and off-deck partnerships with international mobile carriers, aggregators, OEMs, as well as media partners, overseeing all lines of operation and financial performance for the B2B division of the company.


GoMo News

Android “L” developer preview gets ported to HTC One (M7)

htc one android l

Other than the official Android “L” Developer Preview which is available for LG Nexus 5 and Asus Nexus 7 (2013) devices by Google, we’ve seen it ported to the Nexus 4 recently. We knew that this is not the end of it though, of course.

HTC One (M7) unexpectedly gets its own Android “L” Developer Preview port thanks XDA Senior Member ssrij and a team of developers. Nexus 4 port was kind of expected, but not this one. The port is still in alpha though, so keep this in mind if you intend on flashing it. The port was made possible thanks to ramdisk and kernel modifications which ssrij had to do. We say it once again, this is an alpha version of the port and some things will simply not work, at all.

Keeping all this in mind, if you’re interested in it follow this link.

Via: XDA


AndroidGuys

Install Android L “Lemon Cake” Developer Preview on Nexus 4

Android_L_Nexus_4

Nexus 4 owners jealous of those with a Nexus 5 or 7 (2013) running the Android L Developer Preview can get a taste of the next version of Android thanks to developers at XDA Developers forum who ported the rom over to the device.

Since Google only pushed part of the source code to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) for the Nexus 4, the ROM is based on the Nexus 5 and 7′s (2013) Preview System Images and comes thanks to @sykopompos, @defconoi and @ben1066.

It should be noted that while it’s not fully functional yet, most things are working and  it “can be used as a daily driver for the majority of Android users.” Although that’s the case, remember that some apps may not work as developers haven’t updated them yet for the Android L release and since it’s a preview, some things may not work until the official release in the coming months.

Currently noted to not be working is:

  • Camera
  • Bluetooth
  • Swipe-to-Phone-Application not showing on lockscreen
  • SELinux and Knox
  • SuperSU/Root

To install the ROM, follow these instructions after downloading:

  1. Put the file onto your Internal Storage
  2. Reboot into Recovery (CWM/TWRP]
  3. “wipe data/factory reset”
  4. “mounts and storage” -> “format system”
  5. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  6. “install zip” -> “install zip from sdcard” -> choose the mako-bla-bla-zip and confirm flashing procedure
  7. “wipe cache”
  8. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  9. “reboot into system”
  10. first boot may take up to 10 minutes – be patient

At this time, it may be best to just install MultiROM and install the ROM that way, so that you can keep your daily driver. I found that the easiest way to install it is to download “MultiROM Manager” from Google Play and through the app, install MultiROM, recovery and kernel. When you boot into recovery, to install a ROM with MultiROM, you select “Advanced” >> “MultiROM” >> “Add ROM.” The settings I used were “Android” for ROM type, “Don’t share: kernel with Internal ROM and install to “Internal Memory,” then selected the ZIP file and flashed it. You can always delete the ROM then flash this ZIP in recovery to uninstall MultiROM. I included a video at the bottom of the post to show you a little bit more about installing a ROM with MultiROM.

For the latest version of the ported Android L Developer Preview for the Nexus 4, hit up the source link below.

VIA: XDA Developers


AndroidGuys

Install Android L “Lemon Cake” Developer Preview on Nexus 4

Android_L_Nexus_4

Nexus 4 owners jealous of those with a Nexus 5 or 7 (2013) running the Android L Developer Preview can get a taste of the next version of Android thanks to developers at XDA Developers forum who ported the rom over to the device.

Since Google only pushed part of the source code to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) for the Nexus 4, the ROM is based on the Nexus 5 and 7′s (2013) Preview System Images and comes thanks to @sykopompos, @defconoi and @ben1066.

It should be noted that while it’s not fully functional yet, most things are working and  it “can be used as a daily driver for the majority of Android users.” Although that’s the case, remember that some apps may not work as developers haven’t updated them yet for the Android L release and since it’s a preview, some things may not work until the official release in the coming months.

Currently noted to not be working is:

  • Camera
  • Bluetooth
  • Swipe-to-Phone-Application not showing on lockscreen
  • SELinux and Knox
  • SuperSU/Root

To install the ROM, follow these instructions after downloading:

  1. Put the file onto your Internal Storage
  2. Reboot into Recovery (CWM/TWRP]
  3. “wipe data/factory reset”
  4. “mounts and storage” -> “format system”
  5. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  6. “install zip” -> “install zip from sdcard” -> choose the mako-bla-bla-zip and confirm flashing procedure
  7. “wipe cache”
  8. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  9. “reboot into system”
  10. first boot may take up to 10 minutes – be patient

At this time, it may be best to just install MultiROM and install the ROM that way, so that you can keep your daily driver. I found that the easiest way to install it is to download “MultiROM Manager” from Google Play and through the app, install MultiROM, recovery and kernel. When you boot into recovery, to install a ROM with MultiROM, you select “Advanced” >> “MultiROM” >> “Add ROM.” The settings I used were “Android” for ROM type, “Don’t share: kernel with Internal ROM and install to “Internal Memory,” then selected the ZIP file and flashed it. You can always delete the ROM then flash this ZIP in recovery to uninstall MultiROM. I included a video at the bottom of the post to show you a little bit more about installing a ROM with MultiROM.

For the latest version of the ported Android L Developer Preview for the Nexus 4, hit up the source link below.

VIA: XDA Developers


AndroidGuys

Install Android L “Lemon Cake” Developer Preview on Nexus 4

Android_L_Nexus_4

Nexus 4 owners jealous of those with a Nexus 5 or 7 (2013) running the Android L Developer Preview can get a taste of the next version of Android thanks to developers at XDA Developers forum who ported the rom over to the device.

Since Google only pushed part of the source code to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) for the Nexus 4, the ROM is based on the Nexus 5 and 7′s (2013) Preview System Images and comes thanks to @sykopompos, @defconoi and @ben1066.

It should be noted that while it’s not fully functional yet, most things are working and  it “can be used as a daily driver for the majority of Android users.” Although that’s the case, remember that some apps may not work as developers haven’t updated them yet for the Android L release and since it’s a preview, some things may not work until the official release in the coming months.

Currently noted to not be working is:

  • Camera
  • Bluetooth
  • Swipe-to-Phone-Application not showing on lockscreen
  • SELinux and Knox
  • SuperSU/Root

To install the ROM, follow these instructions after downloading:

  1. Put the file onto your Internal Storage
  2. Reboot into Recovery (CWM/TWRP]
  3. “wipe data/factory reset”
  4. “mounts and storage” -> “format system”
  5. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  6. “install zip” -> “install zip from sdcard” -> choose the mako-bla-bla-zip and confirm flashing procedure
  7. “wipe cache”
  8. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  9. “reboot into system”
  10. first boot may take up to 10 minutes – be patient

At this time, it may be best to just install MultiROM and install the ROM that way, so that you can keep your daily driver. I found that the easiest way to install it is to download “MultiROM Manager” from Google Play and through the app, install MultiROM, recovery and kernel. When you boot into recovery, to install a ROM with MultiROM, you select “Advanced” >> “MultiROM” >> “Add ROM.” The settings I used were “Android” for ROM type, “Don’t share: kernel with Internal ROM and install to “Internal Memory,” then selected the ZIP file and flashed it. You can always delete the ROM then flash this ZIP in recovery to uninstall MultiROM. I included a video at the bottom of the post to show you a little bit more about installing a ROM with MultiROM.

For the latest version of the ported Android L Developer Preview for the Nexus 4, hit up the source link below.

VIA: XDA Developers


AndroidGuys

Install Android L “Lemon Cake” Developer Preview on Nexus 4

Android_L_Nexus_4

Nexus 4 owners jealous of those with a Nexus 5 or 7 (2013) running the Android L Developer Preview can get a taste of the next version of Android thanks to developers at XDA Developers forum who ported the rom over to the device.

Since Google only pushed part of the source code to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) for the Nexus 4, the ROM is based on the Nexus 5 and 7′s (2013) Preview System Images and comes thanks to @sykopompos, @defconoi and @ben1066.

It should be noted that while it’s not fully functional yet, most things are working and  it “can be used as a daily driver for the majority of Android users.” Although that’s the case, remember that some apps may not work as developers haven’t updated them yet for the Android L release and since it’s a preview, some things may not work until the official release in the coming months.

Currently noted to not be working is:

  • Camera
  • Bluetooth
  • Swipe-to-Phone-Application not showing on lockscreen
  • SELinux and Knox
  • SuperSU/Root

To install the ROM, follow these instructions after downloading:

  1. Put the file onto your Internal Storage
  2. Reboot into Recovery (CWM/TWRP]
  3. “wipe data/factory reset”
  4. “mounts and storage” -> “format system”
  5. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  6. “install zip” -> “install zip from sdcard” -> choose the mako-bla-bla-zip and confirm flashing procedure
  7. “wipe cache”
  8. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  9. “reboot into system”
  10. first boot may take up to 10 minutes – be patient

At this time, it may be best to just install MultiROM and install the ROM that way, so that you can keep your daily driver. I found that the easiest way to install it is to download “MultiROM Manager” from Google Play and through the app, install MultiROM, recovery and kernel. When you boot into recovery, to install a ROM with MultiROM, you select “Advanced” >> “MultiROM” >> “Add ROM.” The settings I used were “Android” for ROM type, “Don’t share: kernel with Internal ROM and install to “Internal Memory,” then selected the ZIP file and flashed it. You can always delete the ROM then flash this ZIP in recovery to uninstall MultiROM. I included a video at the bottom of the post to show you a little bit more about installing a ROM with MultiROM.

For the latest version of the ported Android L Developer Preview for the Nexus 4, hit up the source link below.

VIA: XDA Developers


AndroidGuys

Install Android L “Lemon Cake” Developer Preview on Nexus 4

Android_L_Nexus_4

Nexus 4 owners jealous of those with a Nexus 5 or 7 (2013) running the Android L Developer Preview can get a taste of the next version of Android thanks to developers at XDA Developers forum who ported the rom over to the device.

Since Google only pushed part of the source code to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) for the Nexus 4, the ROM is based on the Nexus 5 and 7′s (2013) Preview System Images and comes thanks to @sykopompos, @defconoi and @ben1066.

It should be noted that while it’s not fully functional yet, most things are working and  it “can be used as a daily driver for the majority of Android users.” Although that’s the case, remember that some apps may not work as developers haven’t updated them yet for the Android L release and since it’s a preview, some things may not work until the official release in the coming months.

Currently noted to not be working is:

  • Camera
  • Bluetooth
  • Swipe-to-Phone-Application not showing on lockscreen
  • SELinux and Knox
  • SuperSU/Root

To install the ROM, follow these instructions after downloading:

  1. Put the file onto your Internal Storage
  2. Reboot into Recovery (CWM/TWRP]
  3. “wipe data/factory reset”
  4. “mounts and storage” -> “format system”
  5. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  6. “install zip” -> “install zip from sdcard” -> choose the mako-bla-bla-zip and confirm flashing procedure
  7. “wipe cache”
  8. “advanced” -> “wipe dalvik cache”
  9. “reboot into system”
  10. first boot may take up to 10 minutes – be patient

At this time, it may be best to just install MultiROM and install the ROM that way, so that you can keep your daily driver. I found that the easiest way to install it is to download “MultiROM Manager” from Google Play and through the app, install MultiROM, recovery and kernel. When you boot into recovery, to install a ROM with MultiROM, you select “Advanced” >> “MultiROM” >> “Add ROM.” The settings I used were “Android” for ROM type, “Don’t share: kernel with Internal ROM and install to “Internal Memory,” then selected the ZIP file and flashed it. You can always delete the ROM then flash this ZIP in recovery to uninstall MultiROM. I included a video at the bottom of the post to show you a little bit more about installing a ROM with MultiROM.

For the latest version of the ported Android L Developer Preview for the Nexus 4, hit up the source link below.

VIA: XDA Developers


AndroidGuys