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Alcatel Pop 2 the first 64-bit Windows Phone

Published by at 14:49 UTC, September 9th 2014

Seen at IFA, the Alcatel Pop 2 is a Windows Phone 8.1 version of the Android handset of the same name, with 4.5″ 854×480 resolution screen and 1GB of RAM. Crucially, it comes with the Snapdragon 410 processor, making it 64-bit (and not 32-bit). Other specs are modest, with 8GB storage plus microSD, and a ‘4MP’ camera (an odd figure!). LTE is present though, plus the Pop 2 is quoted at only 119 Euros, making it rather good value.

WMPU broke the news:

Pop 2

To the benefit of the Windows Phone, this means the device comes with 1 GB RAM as standard, despite only having a 4.5 inch FWVGA screen, and the latest Snapdragon 410 processor running at 1.2 Ghz, which in fact means it is the first Windows Phone with a 64 bit processor and the Adreno 306 GPU.

The device otherwise features 8GB storage, a 4 megapixel rear camera with LED flash, VGA front camera, 2000 mAh battery and most importantly LTE support, which for the 119 Euro price point makes it a steal over the Nokia Lumia 635, which is 40 euro more expensive.

The handset is 9.9mm thick and weighs 147g and will be available in white, blue, purple, green, red and yellow. It will also be available in Dual-SIM.

The Android version has capacitive controls in that large bottom bezel and it seems that the Windows Phone version simply omits these – with the on-screen controls now, the device looks a bit unbalanced. Given that the (right number of) capacitive control spots were already in place, could they not have been re-used, changing the functions/assignments as needed?

All a little odd, plus it’s unknown at this point quite what difference a 64 bit processor will make to Windows Phone, especially down at this low end of the spectrum.

There’s a video demo, too, by Drwindows.de and in German:

Source / Credit: WMPU

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Link of Interest, Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

Alcatel Pop 2 the first 64-bit Windows Phone

Published by at 14:49 UTC, September 9th 2014

Seen at IFA, the Alcatel Pop 2 is a Windows Phone 8.1 version of the Android handset of the same name, with 4.5″ 854×480 resolution screen and 1GB of RAM. Crucially, it comes with the Snapdragon 410 processor, making it 64-bit (and not 32-bit). Other specs are modest, with 8GB storage plus microSD, and a ‘4MP’ camera (an odd figure!). LTE is present though, plus the Pop 2 is quoted at only 119 Euros, making it rather good value.

WMPU broke the news:

Pop 2

To the benefit of the Windows Phone, this means the device comes with 1 GB RAM as standard, despite only having a 4.5 inch FWVGA screen, and the latest Snapdragon 410 processor running at 1.2 Ghz, which in fact means it is the first Windows Phone with a 64 bit processor and the Adreno 306 GPU.

The device otherwise features 8GB storage, a 4 megapixel rear camera with LED flash, VGA front camera, 2000 mAh battery and most importantly LTE support, which for the 119 Euro price point makes it a steal over the Nokia Lumia 635, which is 40 euro more expensive.

The handset is 9.9mm thick and weighs 147g and will be available in white, blue, purple, green, red and yellow. It will also be available in Dual-SIM.

The Android version has capacitive controls in that large bottom bezel and it seems that the Windows Phone version simply omits these – with the on-screen controls now, the device looks a bit unbalanced. Given that the (right number of) capacitive control spots were already in place, could they not have been re-used, changing the functions/assignments as needed?

All a little odd, plus it’s unknown at this point quite what difference a 64 bit processor will make to Windows Phone, especially down at this low end of the spectrum.

There’s a video demo, too, by Drwindows.de and in German:

Source / Credit: WMPU

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Link of Interest, Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

Moto X, Moto G, and Moto 360 first impressions

It’s no secret what many were looking forward to when it comes to Motorola’s announcements. Sure, there were tours of the “behind the scenes” stuff at Motorola in downtown Chicago, and yes there were a couple of unexpected accessories that came out of the announcements. But we want to talk about some phones and watches, eh? So let’s get to it.

The Moto X

Moto_X_Leather

One of last year’s absolute hit phones was the Moto X. Appropriately, this year’s hit model will also be the “Moto X”. The Moto X 2nd generation will not sport the “plus one” moniker that has been floating around the rumor mill. It will simply be called the Moto X, and we like that, even if it is a bit on the confusing side. But Motorola has pulled no punches with this new generation of X-iness, see what I did there?

Right off the bat, the specifications of this device leave a decidedly more “premium” impression. The processor, the camera sensor, screen, battery, design, and the software have all seen significant upgrades over the first generation Moto X. You can read our full announcement post for all the fun this phone brings, but a few things left me smiling and nodding my head.

First of all, the specs are all better, approaching flagship type specs. The original Moto X went with some less-than-high-end specs, but made up for it with the experience, so much so, that tech reviewers barely mentioned the S4 processor. The new Moto X still offers that premium experience but now carries some horse power to back them up.

The thing that impressed me most about the Moto X was the voice control. Yes it was already present in the Moto X, but now it goes even deeper. One of the most requested features that so many of us wanted from the last Moto X was the ability to customize the “OK, Google” activation phrase. Well, we have good news for you. Now you can. Michael Fisher’s dream of saying “Computer” and waking up the phone can now be a reality. You could also go with something like “Hey, you Cortana wanna-be,” but that would be a bit on the verbose side. You could go with “Oh Captain, my Captain” perhaps, if you don’t mind climbing up on tables all the time. One Motorola representative’s phone activated with “Talk to me, Goose.” We had all the lolz.

Plus, Moto Voice has gotten smarter by adding some new commands and 3rd party app support. You can now use Moto Voice to take a selfie, which launches your front facing camera and initiates a countdown to take the photo. You can also update your Facebook status, launch a YouTube video, or send a Whatsapp message. More third party support will follow according to representatives at the event.

There were a number of other software and hardware enhancements that caught my eye, but the voice control is something near and dear to our hearts. Bottom line, this will likely be my next Android smartphone. There are far fewer compromises in this phone than in the last one. One of my bigger hangups is the lack of OIS in this camera, but I’m willing to forgive in light of everything else this brings to the table. Stay tuned for our official review in the coming weeks, but so far our first impressions are a pretty solid thumbs up.

One final note about the Moto X that really knocked quite a few socks off was an accessory called the “Turbo charger”. This charger for the Moto X will allow you to plug in your phone and within 15 minutes, you will have 8 hours of battery life in your phone. We did not get a turbo charger review unit, so we weren’t able to see this in action, but if that’s the case…holy crow.

The Moto 360

Moto_360_on_wrist

Next up, we have the Moto 360 – the round smartwatch from Motorola and probably the most anticipated smartwatch to date. The Moto 360 is a sleek timepiece that Motorola doesn’t want to be called a “smartwatch” because it their opinion it’s a timepiece first, and smartphone accessory second. The beautiful hardware is accentuated by a strong and soft leather band, or one of two stainless steel bands which will be made available at a later time. The watch band will also be changeable which will be a bonus for some.

When talking about the Moto 360, you really do have to focus on the hardware, because software wise, it’s Android Wear, which is fine, but in Michael Fisher’s opinion, not quite ready for prime time. The demos we saw of the Moto 360 in action worked fine and as expected, so there’s not really much to say here. But the hardware of the Moto 360 really does set it apart from the competition.

We saw the various levels of technical expertise that went into designing the Moto 360 and believe me, this was more than just a cocktail napkin sketch. Original prototypes of a Motorola watch were indeed square, but the philosophy of the company dictates that “round” is a “stored shape” in people’s minds – time is round, so the watch had to be too.

Other parts about the hardware that stood out where it’s bulk, and yes, the flat tire. At the bottom. The flat part at the bottom of the watch is jarring at first, but after a bit of time we stopped really noticing it. Until the watch face turned white, and then, there it was. The design of the watch was such that the flat tire had to be there to make the bezels around the glass as thin as they are. I can definitely see the argument there, but that doesn’t make it more acceptable, at least not in my book. That, combined with the thickness of the watch, honestly left me a little let down in the Moto 360 department.

But then the Moto G showed up.

The Moto G

Moto_G_Back

The Moto G, Motorola’s low-mid range phone announced it’s presence with authority at this event, almost as much as the Moto X itself. The Moto G brings a lot of upgrades to the table, but three things really stood out in my mind, so I’ll list them for you here.

First, the Moto G is bringing front facing, stereo speakers to the party. These front facers are pretty loud and deliver a very good audio experience, though we did hear a bit of peaking going on during one of the heavier songs played. All the same, the impact of front facing speakers can’t be overstated. They should be standard on every phone going forward in our humble opinions anyway.

The Moto G is also bringing Micro SD card support to its newest model which is a pretty huge consideration. With only 8 or 16 GB storage options, additional Micro SD cards could make a huge difference in the overall phone experience.

Finally, the price of the Moto G is exactly the same as the previous generation- $ 179.00. That’s major, and frankly, it makes us a little more anxious about Windows Phone’s presence in emerging markets. With the updated specifications of this phone, at the same price, this phone becomes very compelling indeed.

Overall, Motorola made quite a splash today in the smartphone space. The Moto X, Moto G and Moto 360 are all really impressive pieces of hardware and Motorola will likely see very well deserved success with its new line of devices. Stay tuned for our full reviews of all of these devices that will be coming, but for now, those are our first impressions.

 


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First look at the Prestigio Multiphone 8500 Duo

Published by at 7:19 UTC, September 3rd 2014

In a rare change from Microsoft/Nokia/Lumia coverage, guest contributor Paul Ivins here manages to get his hands on the new Prestigio Multiphone 8500 Duo, last noted on AAWP here, and shoots a few snaps, along with some first impressions. 

From our initial story:

Prestigio Multiphone 8500 DUO Dual-SIM WP8.1 smartphone is now available and offers a 5 inch 720P IPS screen with Gorilla Glass, 1 GB RAM, 8 GB internal storage, 2 megapixel front and 8 megapixel rear camera (no LTE) in an 8.5 mm body for only 154 Euro ($ 200, £120).

Paul writes:

“On turning on the handset the default speech language is US English and if the device has been upgraded to 8.1.1 then you cannot download any other speech pack, so Cortana and its features, such as quiet hours, won’t work unless it’s set to US settings (I tried the adding a new keyboard trick but this didn’t resolve the issue).

Prestigio 8500

“For some reason, the handset is supplied with a 2 pin charger. I contacted Prestigio, who said that they do not sell handsets to the US but couldn’t explain why that charger was included or why the handset defaults to US English.

“I’m using a Lumia 820 at the moment and, like yourself, I prefer a phone sized phone! (4.3″ in my case), The Prestigio phone is 5” and rather than putting the volume on the top right it’s on the top left, and where I feel the volume button should be is the power/unlock button which can be hard to reach with one handed operation.

“As the handset is 5”, a lot of the text on some screens/web pages etc. can be quite small, even with ease of access text enlarged to full.

Prestigio 8500

“I tried downloading Nokia Camera/Beta and these were unavailable, as well as some other Microsoft mobile apps, such as Access point, so data/mms settings have to be entered manually. Mind you, other Microsoft Corporation apps are available, such as Battery saver, OneDrive, Heath & Fitness, Travel, Food & Drink, Weather, a News, Sport, Finance, YouTube, PDF Reader, Files, Bing Translator, Preview for Developers, GroupMe, Live Lock Screen beta, etc

“With Steve in mind, I tested the speaker, I played the same song on the Prestigio and the Lumia 820 and although the Prestigio was good quality, not tinny, etc, it was not as loud as on the 820. Plus the 8500’s screen has good visibility in sunlight. It doesn’t have double tap to wake though, like the Lumias….

“I may consider sending this back and buying the 4″ version as this is only about £60 (the 5″ version is €154/£127), to use as a second/spare handset.”

Thanks Paul!

Prestigio 8500

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

First sighting of Sony Xperia Z3, Z3 Compact

sony_logo_720w

It seems that Sony is getting ready to release their upcoming smartphones, which will be known as the Sony Xperia Z3 and the Xperia Z3 Compact. If the image shown below is accurate, then it is confirmed that Sony is going with the Omni-Balance design for their upcoming flagships as well.

Xperia-Z3-Compact1No more information about the devices are known right now, but we can expect Sony to release it during the IFA event which will take place in Berlin during September.

This is all what we know right now. Do you think that Sony should release their future devices with Omni-Balance design language?


AndroidGuys

First sighting of Sony Xperia Z3, Z3 Compact

sony_logo_720w

It seems that Sony is getting ready to release their upcoming smartphones, which will be known as the Sony Xperia Z3 and the Xperia Z3 Compact. If the image shown below is accurate, then it is confirmed that Sony is going with the Omni-Balance design for their upcoming flagships as well.

Xperia-Z3-Compact1No more information about the devices are known right now, but we can expect Sony to release it during the IFA event which will take place in Berlin during September.

This is all what we know right now. Do you think that Sony should release their future devices with Omni-Balance design language?


AndroidGuys

First sighting of Sony Xperia Z3, Z3 Compact

sony_logo_720w

It seems that Sony is getting ready to release their upcoming smartphones, which will be known as the Sony Xperia Z3 and the Xperia Z3 Compact. If the image shown below is accurate, then it is confirmed that Sony is going with the Omni-Balance design for their upcoming flagships as well.

Xperia-Z3-Compact1No more information about the devices are known right now, but we can expect Sony to release it during the IFA event which will take place in Berlin during September.

This is all what we know right now. Do you think that Sony should release their future devices with Omni-Balance design language?


AndroidGuys

First sighting of Sony Xperia Z3, Z3 Compact

sony_logo_720w

It seems that Sony is getting ready to release their upcoming smartphones, which will be known as the Sony Xperia Z3 and the Xperia Z3 Compact. If the image shown below is accurate, then it is confirmed that Sony is going with the Omni-Balance design for their upcoming flagships as well.

Xperia-Z3-Compact1No more information about the devices are known right now, but we can expect Sony to release it during the IFA event which will take place in Berlin during September.

This is all what we know right now. Do you think that Sony should release their future devices with Omni-Balance design language?


AndroidGuys

First Impression: Android L On My Nexus 5

Android-L-Preview

Yesterday during the Google I/O keynote, Google announced the latest version of Android, simply named L. The actual name for the latest OS version has yet to be announced, but earlier today, Google released the Developer Preview. Needless to say, once I saw it was available, I sat down and installed it on my Nexus 5. As of right now, with the Developer Previews for L, you can only test them out on a Nexus 5 or a Nexus 7 2013, so not everyone with a Nexus can try out this version just yet.

Android L Home Screen

After wrangling with Terminal, and making sure that I had the SDK and ADB installed properly on my MacBook Pro, I finally was able to get the developer preview installed on my Nexus 5, and I was off to the races. The set up for Android L is essentially the same as with any other Nexus device when you start it up for the first time, with the big Play triangle telling you to get moving. After I got connected to my Wi-Fi and signed in with my Google account, I was good to go.

Keyboard


Android L Keyboard

The first thing I noticed different about L was that keyboard. I love minimal and flat designs, and when the keyboard popped up, I was instantly in love. The transition graphics from having no keyboard on the screen, to having the keyboard appear, is gorgeous. It’s fluid, and it’s just different. Whenever you find something you love, there’s always something about it that bugs you. Normal typing with the new keyboard was perfect, and never lagged once. However, once I started to use the gesture typing functionality, I ran into a few hiccups. The first being that as Google Keyboard is trying to guess what you’re typing, it would hang up, and I would end up with a fragmented sentence that made no sense. The second being that I would slide my finger from the A to the L on the keyboard, and the input would think I had stopped at the J. I’m not exactly sure why it did this, but I’ve just reverted to normal texting for a little bit.

Navigation Bar


Now before everyone starts freaking out about how to get this look, you can head on over to the AndroidGuys Get This Look section, and get the wallpaper, as well as the navigation buttons, so you can make your device look just like it’s running Android L. I’ll admit, when I first saw the screenshots yesterday of those navigation buttons, I was a little upset. I liked the older ones, and didn’t really think that Google needed to mess with anything like that, but the more that I use L, the more I’m getting used to the look of them.

Android L Recent Apps

Swiping up on the “Home” button will still take you directly to Google Now if you want it to, and the Square, is now your recent apps drawer, which is what threw me off the most. Speaking of the Recent Apps drawer, Google took to this section to also redesign the way it appears on your devices. The collapsible cards theme runs deep in Android L and is found here as well. If you want to close out an application, simple swipe away, like normal, or hit the “X” in the top right hand corner of each card.

Notification Drawer


Android L Notification Drawer

Magnifique. Like most new things, there are pieces here and there that don’t make sense at first, but usually do later on. When I first pulled my notification drawer down, I just saw a few blocks, and I wasn’t exactly sure on what to do with them. There was also no ability to two-finger swipe to bring the settings toggles down. The overall design of the notification drawer, and the notifications that it holds, are beautiful. Just swipe your notifications left or right, like normal, to dismiss them, or tap on one to open the application, from which the notification came from.

Android Quick Toggles

At the top of the notification drawer, you can see the time, network status, battery life icon, and your Google+ profile picture, but if you swipe down from that bar specifically, you are presented with your quick toggles. Now these aren’t as robust as they used to be on previous versions of Android, but you get the most commonly used toggles such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Airplane Mode, Auto-Rotate, Location, and a couple of newbies to join the group. There is still a brightness control slider at the top of the quick settings panel, and you can still get to the Settings application by tapping the gear in the top right hand corner, but in Android L, you can now turn on and off notifications (Do Not Disturb) and you can also Cast your screen to your Chromecast. We’ll get more in depth with that, later in the week.

Lock Screen


Android L Lockscreen

Just as with the Notification Drawer, the Android L Lock Screen has the collapsable cards that Google showed off during the I/O presentation. Smack dab in the middle of the screen is your lock screen clock, in all of it’s Roboto Light glory. When you have missed notifications, you no longer have to unlock the phone and then view the application. Simply tap twice on whatever notification you are trying to access, and your device unlocks and takes you to the corresponding application.

Android L Lockscreen Interaction

In the bottom right and left hand corners, are two shortcut icons. The icons on the right is for your camera, while the icon on the left is for your Phone. In order to access either of these applications, swipe in from the corresponding side, and that application will open up. If you swipe left or right normally, you will no longer be able to just unlock your phone, due to the unlock gesture changing to swiping up from the bottom of the screen. For some users, while charging your device, you can see how much time remains until your device is fully charged. I tried to see if I could be able to see that information, but I didn’t have the same luck as others that do.

Settings


Android L Settings

The Settings application has also had a complete redesign from top to bottom, and there are a few additional settings that have been added to Android L. The first of which is Do Not Disturb mode. This is a feature that I LOVE on my iPhone because of the fact that I get tired of my device constantly buzzing or beeping or dinging while I’m trying to get some work done. The nice thing about this feature on Android L, is the different settings that you can manually toggle, or set depending upon who you would want to hear from if you were in the middle of doing something. You can also set specific times that you want Do Not Disturb to activate, so that you don’t have to worry about going in and turning the feature on.

Android L Do Not Disturb

While perusing around the various different Settings panels, you can see the different graphics in play. If you scroll all the way to the bottom, or all the way to the top, it appears as if a light blue wave has come across the top or bottom of your screen. Similar to the bounce that you can get when scrolling through your home screen. There are also animations whenever you tap a specific panel from within the Settings application, and while not necessary or detrimental to the build, Google definitely added a nice touch there.

Android L animations

Conclusion


I’ve been playing around with Android L for a couple of hours now, and while this is just a first impressions of Android L, there are a lot of things that Google changed up in it’s latest iteration of Android. Have you tried out Android L yet? What are your thoughts on it? Leave you comments and questions below, and we’ll be able to get back to you promptly. Be sure to keep your eyes out for the full breakdown later this week.


AndroidGuys

Samsung Gear Live Specs: a first stab at Android Wear

Just a few weeks ago, if you told us Samsung was going to launch an Android Wear-powered smartwatch at Google I/O, we’d have thought you’re crazy. But a report earlier this week suggested otherwise, and it turns out said report was correct. Samsung launched its Gear Live today at I/O, and it’ll be available for order later today, so you’re probably wondering — what are the Samsung Gear Live specs?

We’ve gone ahead and brought the specs for the Gear Live all into one place, and it’s actually not too terrible a product. It’s similar to a midrange phone just as the G Watch, but it does feature leaps ahead in a couple key categories. The screen’s a bit better, and there’s even a heart rate monitor involved (thanks, Samsung!).

Check out the full Samsung Gear Live specs right down below.

gear-live

Dimensions: 37.9 x 56.4 x 8.9 mm, 59g

CPU: 1.2 GHz Processor

RAM: 512MB

Internal storage: 4GB

Display: 1.63-inch Super AMOLED (320 x 320)

Battery: 300mAh

Connectivity: Bluetooth® v4.0 LE

Sensors: Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Compass, Heart Rate

Colors: Black / Wine Red

Miscellaneous: IP67 Dust and Water Resistant, changeable strap


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