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Send SMS with your Android smartphone from any device with EndlessJabber (Review)

Screen Shot 2014-09-05 at 8.12.19 PM

Send SMS with your Android smartphone from any device with EndlessJabber (Review) Reviewed by on Sep 1. Rating: 5

For years, one of the things I’ve always wanted was an easy way to be able to send text messages while on different devices, especially my laptop or desktop computer. This is one of the main reasons why services like Facebook Messenger and Google Hangouts have always been my go to messenger services since I could just pickup where I left off chatting, whether I was on my desktop at work, laptop at home, tablet or my smartphone.

While I’ve tried a few apps in the past, none were perfect. One of the first that I remember trying many years ago was Koush’s DeskSMS, which to me, wasn’t as reliable and didn’t have as nice an interface as EndlessJabber does.

“To setup the app, it’s extremely simple. All you have to do is head to their website, www.endlessjabber.com, and click install, which will take you to Google Play where you can download the app on your Android smartphone. On your smartphone, go through the setup on the app, which the company says, “takes just 1 tap.” All you’re doing here is connecting the app to your Google account and granting the app access to your text messages, which will then sync all of your text messages to the app. Although they recommend using EvolveSMS from Klinker Apps, whom they partnered with, it works fine with other SMS apps, such as Google Hangouts, my default SMS app. With that done, all you need to do is go to www.endlessjabber.com/web on any other device and sign in to your Google account, then you can chat just as you would on your smartphone but through this web interface seen below.

Screen Shot 2014-09-05 at 8.16.12 PMAll of the text messages on your device will show up when you head to the web interface. Besides just sending messages, you are able to attach photos from the current device you’re using to the SMS, view all your contacts on your smartphone, view a Gallery of photos you’ve been texted and view statistics such as how many texts you’re sending in a day, who you’re texting the most, etc. EndlessJabber will also tell you the current time and how much juice is left in your phone’s battery, just so you can be sure it doesn’t die on you.

The app is very well polished and I think the only issue I noticed is that emoticons didn’t always show up as pictures as they would on your smartphone. They would show up while accessing the web interface on Mozilla Firefox, but didn’t always show up in Google Chrome, although they were unique ones like beer mugs and fireworks. It would also be nice if you were able to access the gallery on your smartphone, but that’s not a deal breaker at all.

EndlessJabber also has a few extras that I wanted to mention. Along with the Android app and web interface, EndlessJabber also has Chrome and Firefox Extensions which will give you a notification whenever you receive a message so you don’t always have to be on that tab to see the messages you receive.

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 10.48.22 AM

One of the best things about the app is that it is free to use, unlike DeskSMS that was about $ 5 a year. Although I didn’t get to test it out, there is a paid version of the app, EndlessJabber Pro, that’s $ 1.99 a month after a free 7 day. It extends the experience with some “pro” features including JabberMode that enables you to instantly send and receive SMS messages by bypassing the free Google Cloud Messaging infrastructure, Search, so you can search for a specific text or bit of info you received, themes, the ability to schedule texts in advance to send at a later time, more analytics as well as XMPP integration to use it with other chat clients such as Pidgin and Trillian, among other features.

One last thing, EndlessJabber is currently seeking to raise funds through Kickstarter to help its app grow, since they are a small startup. Check out the campaign here.They note that funds from the campaign will be used to determine the appropriate marketing strategy to achieve their goals, find an appropriate marketing firm and execute on the marketing strategy. If you do decide to contribute, you can get nice rewards such as EndlessJabber Pro subscriptions, visibility on their site and social networks and even a t-shirt. Some of these rewards are pretty nice, especially since most will give you a discount on a pro subscription.

If EndlessJabber sounds like something you’ve been waiting for, don’t hesitate to check it out! If you need a little more help using EndlessJabber, here’s more info on their blog.


AndroidGuys

Android Wear BeeLink: Connect to Android devices from your smartwatch [‘Watch’ This App]

One of the biggest complaints from smartwatch users is that it’s a difficult process to connect the smartwatch to their different Android devices. Users oftentimes find it to be a confusing, tedious process, and just plain hard to switch from one device to another. If this is a problem you have, then the Android Wear BeeLink app might… Read more »

The post Android Wear BeeLink: Connect to Android devices from your smartwatch [‘Watch’ This App] appeared first on SmarterWatching.

Read the rest at SmarterWatching.com!


AndroidGuys

Get 70% off 3 years of premium protection from VPN Unlimited

While the internet has made our lives easier, there also exists a criminal element online that threatens to steal our data and identities. You can put a stop to that by purchasing the VPN Premium Unlimited Plan for only $ 19 at the Pocketnow Deals store.

A VPN is a Virtual Private Network. It keeps your identity anonymous and untraceable while conducting business online and, in turn, that protects your data from being hacked. A nice added bonus of a VPN is that it gives you the freedom to access geo-restricted online content, as services such as Netflix won’t know where you are located.

With the VPN Premium Unlimited Plan, you get 3 years of protection. It works on iOS and Android, along with Mac, PC, or Linux environments. Even better, you can activate your VPN Premium Unlimited Plan on up to 5 devices, giving you protection for every device in your household.

Make your internet usage stress free. Get 3 years of hacker protection and the ability to access geo-restricted content with the VPN Premium Unlimited Plan for just $ 19 at the Pocketnow Deals store.

Link: Get 70% Off 3 Years Of VPN Unlimited – $ 19


Pocketnow

The HTC One M8 comes from Android to Windows Phone

Published by at 14:20 UTC, August 19th 2014

Admittedly only on Verizon only at first, but launched today was a version of HTC’s aluminium One (M8) design for Windows Phone – the M8 launched on Android earlier this year and was notable in its use of virtual controls. A factor which no doubt helped the reconfiguration of the handset for Windows Phone 8.1. Details below.

One M8 for WIndows

The HTC One M8 for Windows (Phone) should be available tomorrow in the USA on Verizon, and includes the following specifications (apart from the OS, identical to the Android release):

  • Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1 (the first Windows Phone to ship with this, if true)
  • 160g, 146 x 71 x 9mm
  • 2.3 GHz quad-core, Qualcomm Snapdragon 801
  • 32GB internal storage
  • micro SD expansion (up to 128GB)
  • 2GB of RAM
  • 5″ 1080p HD, Super LCD3 display with Corning Gorilla Glass 3
  • (Sealed) 2600 mAh battery
  • 4MP HTC ‘UltraPixel’ main camera, plus secondary ‘depth field’ camera and ‘UFocus’ feature
  • 5MP front-facing camera
  • uses nano SIM
  • Front facing ‘Boomsound’ stereo speakers
  • Blinkfeed news and feed aggregator application
  • HTC Dot View case

There’s also, reportedly, support for HTC’s Dot View case, allowing you to interact with the device when the case is closed. The accessory will let you see who is calling,  to accept or reject the call and, by swiping down, you can access Cortana. 

The ‘HTC One for Windows’ is exclusive to Verizon Wireless and is available for $ 99 with a new contract or $ 30 with Verizon Edge. 

A very interesting addition to the Windows Phone stable for mid 2014. We’ve seen a lot of Far East licensees launch devices, but this USA-launched phone stands by far the best chance of making it to other carriers and countries, at least from our European point of view.

The One (M8)’s specs aren’t totally dissimilar to those of the existing Nokia Lumia 930, with the card expansion, speaker set-up and Dot View case being the main differentiators, other than the materials used. Plus the camera, of course.

For those that are wondering about the ‘Ultrapixels’ and ‘depth field’ camera, I’ve tested these at length in the Android world. The theory is that larger pixels enable better low light performance, but in practice, the resolution just isn’t high enough for any kind of decent resolution once you start cropping or editing photos – almost every reviewer has ended up being a bit disappointed. Low light imagery is indeed quite good, but arguably not as good as that from Nokia’s higher resolution OIS-assisted phone cameras.

One (M8) camera arrangement

The depth camera is interesting, providing extra information for the software to process images if needed, artificially (bokeh) blurring parts of the image away from the user selected ‘focal point’. It’s a kludge, but no more so than Nokia’s also messy Refocus system, which works very differently. To be absolutely honest, neither system gets close to real, detailed depth of field of a close-up subject created by decent optics and a knowledgeable user.

We’ll report on future One (M8) launches across the world in due course. It’s not known how long the current ‘exclusive’ arrangement is valid for.

I’m puzzled over the OS version being used though – the video below (and hands-on reports at the event) talk about Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1 being used out of the box – forgive me, but isn’t this OS version still in early testing, via the likes of the Developer Preview programme? Maybe HTC simply has a lot of confidence in the OS’s stability now? Comments welcome!

PS. Verizon already has up a promotional video for the HTC One (M8) for Windows:

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

The HTC One M8 comes from Android to Windows Phone

Published by at 14:20 UTC, August 19th 2014

Admittedly only on Verizon only at first, but launched today was a version of HTC’s aluminium One (M8) design for Windows Phone – the M8 launched on Android earlier this year and was notable in its use of virtual controls. A factor which no doubt helped the reconfiguration of the handset for Windows Phone 8.1. Details below.

One M8 for WIndows

The HTC One M8 for Windows (Phone) should be available tomorrow in the USA on Verizon, and includes the following specifications (apart from the OS, identical to the Android release):

  • Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1 (the first Windows Phone to ship with this, if true)
  • 160g, 146 x 71 x 9mm
  • 2.3 GHz quad-core, Qualcomm Snapdragon 801
  • 32GB internal storage
  • micro SD expansion (up to 128GB)
  • 2GB of RAM
  • 5″ 1080p HD, Super LCD3 display with Corning Gorilla Glass 3
  • (Sealed) 2600 mAh battery
  • 4MP HTC ‘UltraPixel’ main camera, plus secondary ‘depth field’ camera and ‘UFocus’ feature
  • 5MP front-facing camera
  • uses nano SIM
  • Front facing ‘Boomsound’ stereo speakers
  • Blinkfeed news and feed aggregator application
  • HTC Dot View case

There’s also, reportedly, support for HTC’s Dot View case, allowing you to interact with the device when the case is closed. The accessory will let you see who is calling,  to accept or reject the call and, by swiping down, you can access Cortana. 

The ‘HTC One for Windows’ is exclusive to Verizon Wireless and is available for $ 99 with a new contract or $ 30 with Verizon Edge. 

A very interesting addition to the Windows Phone stable for mid 2014. We’ve seen a lot of Far East licensees launch devices, but this USA-launched phone stands by far the best chance of making it to other carriers and countries, at least from our European point of view.

The One (M8)’s specs aren’t totally dissimilar to those of the existing Nokia Lumia 930, with the card expansion, speaker set-up and Dot View case being the main differentiators, other than the materials used. Plus the camera, of course.

For those that are wondering about the ‘Ultrapixels’ and ‘depth field’ camera, I’ve tested these at length in the Android world. The theory is that larger pixels enable better low light performance, but in practice, the resolution just isn’t high enough for any kind of decent resolution once you start cropping or editing photos – almost every reviewer has ended up being a bit disappointed. Low light imagery is indeed quite good, but arguably not as good as that from Nokia’s higher resolution OIS-assisted phone cameras.

One (M8) camera arrangement

The depth camera is interesting, providing extra information for the software to process images if needed, artificially (bokeh) blurring parts of the image away from the user selected ‘focal point’. It’s a kludge, but no more so than Nokia’s also messy Refocus system, which works very differently. To be absolutely honest, neither system gets close to real, detailed depth of field of a close-up subject created by decent optics and a knowledgeable user.

We’ll report on future One (M8) launches across the world in due course. It’s not known how long the current ‘exclusive’ arrangement is valid for.

I’m puzzled over the OS version being used though – the video below (and hands-on reports at the event) talk about Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1 being used out of the box – forgive me, but isn’t this OS version still in early testing, via the likes of the Developer Preview programme? Maybe HTC simply has a lot of confidence in the OS’s stability now? Comments welcome!

PS. Verizon already has up a promotional video for the HTC One (M8) for Windows:

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

The HTC One M8 comes from Android to Windows Phone

Published by at 14:20 UTC, August 19th 2014

Admittedly only on Verizon only at first, but launched today was a version of HTC’s aluminium One (M8) design for Windows Phone – the M8 launched on Android earlier this year and was notable in its use of virtual controls. A factor which no doubt helped the reconfiguration of the handset for Windows Phone 8.1. Details below.

One M8 for WIndows

The HTC One M8 for Windows (Phone) should be available tomorrow in the USA on Verizon, and includes the following specifications (apart from the OS, identical to the Android release):

  • Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1 (the first Windows Phone to ship with this, if true)
  • 160g, 146 x 71 x 9mm
  • 2.3 GHz quad-core, Qualcomm Snapdragon 801
  • 32GB internal storage
  • micro SD expansion (up to 128GB)
  • 2GB of RAM
  • 5″ 1080p HD, Super LCD3 display with Corning Gorilla Glass 3
  • (Sealed) 2600 mAh battery
  • 4MP HTC ‘UltraPixel’ main camera, plus secondary ‘depth field’ camera and ‘UFocus’ feature
  • 5MP front-facing camera
  • uses nano SIM
  • Front facing ‘Boomsound’ stereo speakers
  • Blinkfeed news and feed aggregator application
  • HTC Dot View case

There’s also, reportedly, support for HTC’s Dot View case, allowing you to interact with the device when the case is closed. The accessory will let you see who is calling,  to accept or reject the call and, by swiping down, you can access Cortana. 

The ‘HTC One for Windows’ is exclusive to Verizon Wireless and is available for $ 99 with a new contract or $ 30 with Verizon Edge. 

A very interesting addition to the Windows Phone stable for mid 2014. We’ve seen a lot of Far East licensees launch devices, but this USA-launched phone stands by far the best chance of making it to other carriers and countries, at least from our European point of view.

The One (M8)’s specs aren’t totally dissimilar to those of the existing Nokia Lumia 930, with the card expansion, speaker set-up and Dot View case being the main differentiators, other than the materials used. Plus the camera, of course.

For those that are wondering about the ‘Ultrapixels’ and ‘depth field’ camera, I’ve tested these at length in the Android world. The theory is that larger pixels enable better low light performance, but in practice, the resolution just isn’t high enough for any kind of decent resolution once you start cropping or editing photos – almost every reviewer has ended up being a bit disappointed. Low light imagery is indeed quite good, but arguably not as good as that from Nokia’s higher resolution OIS-assisted phone cameras.

One (M8) camera arrangement

The depth camera is interesting, providing extra information for the software to process images if needed, artificially (bokeh) blurring parts of the image away from the user selected ‘focal point’. It’s a kludge, but no more so than Nokia’s also messy Refocus system, which works very differently. To be absolutely honest, neither system gets close to real, detailed depth of field of a close-up subject created by decent optics and a knowledgeable user.

We’ll report on future One (M8) launches across the world in due course. It’s not known how long the current ‘exclusive’ arrangement is valid for.

I’m puzzled over the OS version being used though – the video below (and hands-on reports at the event) talk about Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1 being used out of the box – forgive me, but isn’t this OS version still in early testing, via the likes of the Developer Preview programme? Maybe HTC simply has a lot of confidence in the OS’s stability now? Comments welcome!

PS. Verizon already has up a promotional video for the HTC One (M8) for Windows:

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

The road from Nokia MixRadio to just MixRadio to ???

Published by at 9:18 UTC, July 28th 2014

MixRadio has seen quite a bit of activity in the last four months, since our last mention back in March (with v4.3), not least a token name change and uncertainty over the service’s future. With this being baked into the new Windows Phone 8.1 that’s being acquired or updated to, I thought it might be appropriate to see what has been added and to muse on where MixRadio might go.

The latest version, 4.5.1.448, has, over the previously reported v4.3:

  • The automatic refresh of offline mixes. These will try to refresh after 20 days when the app is open and connected to WiFi, ensuring that they don’t lapse.
      
  • You can now search for mixes, in addition to  in the integral (Nokia) music store and in the gig/tickets database.
      
  • Mixes will now ‘be recommended to you, based on your unique music profile’. I suppose it’s good that someone’s tracking what music I like to play in association with my Microsoft account, but it’s a tiny bit creepy, of course(!)
     
  • The ‘Nokia’ name has been removed from the name, i.e it’s just “MixRadio” from here on in.
      
  • The usual ‘Bug fixes and performance improvements’.

Screenshot, MixRadioScreenshot, MixRadio

Long pressing on an offline mix lets you take it offline – and now auto-refreshed, with new content, at least every 20 days. Sooo cool.

Screenshot, MixRadioScreenshot, MixRadio

Searching within mixes amd within the gig database – looks like Mr Bonamassa’s on tour!

All well and good, though with massive Microsoft/Nokia job cuts in progress, plus the obvious overlap between MixRadio’s commercial side and Microsoft’s existing Xbox Music, there’s definitely talk of spinning MixRadio off as a totally separate company. In an interview, MixRadio boss Jyrki Rosenberg spoke to Music Ally:

What does this mean for Nokia’s well-regarded MixRadio streaming music service? We’ve been wondering whether it would be merged with Microsoft’s own Xbox Music or even shut down since the acquisition was announced.

It’s neither though. “Basically, we’re planning a spin-off… Microsoft is going to focus on developing and maintaining the best operating system for consumers to use music and entertainment with their choice of third-party applications”.

Rosenberg stressed that Microsoft and MixRadio will maintain strong links, including continuing to preload its app on Windows Phone smartphones. But as an independent company, MixRadio’s horizons have suddenly got much, much wider.

“For me personally it’s very exciting. I’ve been meeting with potential investors around the world in the last few weeks. We have very strong interest from investors in the US, Europe and Asia, and we remain open for further discussions,” he said.

Rosenberg declined to give specific details on how MixRadio’s service might evolve now it’s independent. Its current focus is personal radio: mixes (playlists) curated by its in-house team of “mixologists”, which can be streamed and/or cached on users’ devices.

The kicker, if independent, will be how MixRadio makes money. Things will have to be rethought. At the moment there are tie ins to the (presumably to be phased out) Nokia-run music store and to gig/ticket listings, plus there was the MixRadio+ programme, and also heavy funding from Nokia. All of this is up in the air to some degree. 

If I had to guess, I’d look for a separate company but with official tie ins to the Xbox music store and the ramping up of the ‘+’ service in term of promotion and competition.

Interesting all round!

Source / Credit: Windows Phone Store

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Apps
 

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All About Windows Phone

All About Qi (charging): interview with John Perzow from the WPC

Published by at 12:44 UTC, July 25th 2014

As something of a fan of wireless charging in general and Qi in particular, I jumped at the chance to interview John Perzow, VP of market development at the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC), which created and is continually evolving the Qi standard. A man to answer some of those questions I’d been wanting to ask for ages….

Hi John, welcome to AAWP!

John Perzow

Steve Litchfield (SL): It seems that we’ve been talking about Qi winning in the wireless charging standards war for several years, yet the Powermat people in the USA still seem to talk as if they’re the natural choice, with installations in travel lounges, etc. All this despite Qi being used in the vast majority of wirelessly chargeable devices. What will it take to finally make Qi the standard?

John Perzow (JP): There are over 500 different types of Qi-enabled products and an installed base of over 50 million Qi units in the market today. What makes Qi unique is that it has a presence in public venues all around the world. There are over 200 members that have adopted Qi technology, including big names such as LG, Samsung, Sony, Philips, Panasonic and Verizon.

Qi has the highest efficiency, lowest cost and the greatest variety of options available. If your car has wireless charging built in, it’s Qi. Qi continues to evolve with more products, services and technology. There is no advantage with any other approach, only more risk and higher cost. So, I think we keep doing what we’re doing. 

SL: How are we doing on QI installations around the world, in (public) physical venues? Have we moved on beyond ‘trials’ yet?

JP: The trial stage ended in 2009. Products available today are mature and effective. Qi deployment has, particularly in the last year, exploded in public venues and autos around the world. Members of the WPC have installed Qi technology into major airports, including in the U.S., China and Japan. There are over 800 charging locations in eight U.S. airports alone. Qi charge spots are also appearing in new locations, such as restaurants, schools and many other public venues in the U.S., Canada and Europe. WPC members are working hard every day to bring new products and business-friendly Qi-based systems to public locations worldwide.

SL: I’ve written in the past that Qi wireless charging is less efficient than traditional wired charging and, in my tests, have seen charging times about 30%-40% longer and greater heat generated. Do you have any accurate stats to put forward here? Surely, if everyone goes wireless then we’re wasting energy, as a species?(!)

JP: We at the WPC agree – designers have a responsibility to create the most efficient systems possible. From operating frequency to coil structure, Qi uses the most efficient design choices. Naturally, the early versions of wireless charging technology were less efficient than today’s systems. I’d say that they were running on average of 65 percent to 70 percent, which is similar to the first mobile phone chargers. But, like any good standard, Qi technology is always evolving. Qi products on the market today exceed 80 percent efficiency, which approaches wired charging. Qi has several technologies available and the close-coupled version is the most efficient and lowest cost wireless charging system available anywhere. Qi can be even more efficient than wired (according to Texas Instruments) when fully integrated into the cell phone charging architecture. 

If wireless charge spots are available wherever we need them to be, we can reduce or eliminate chargers with every new phone. We can even cut the size of the Lithium-ion battery. These changes would result in meaningful environmental benefits.

Nokia's charging pad

SL: What’s the future for Qi, technically? And will whatever comes next be completely backwards compatible with today’s implementations?

JP: Members of the WPC are driving numerous important technology advancements, including power transfer up to 2000 watts for kitchen appliances and finely-tuned resonance technology for infrastructure, furniture and other types of applications. Also in development are medium power systems for notebook computing – and there’s a lot more to come. Fundamental to any real standard is backward compatibility and interoperability. If it bears the Qi logo, it will work, today and tomorrow, no matter the manufacture. 

SL: Do you have any sense of whether Apple will ever embrace any wireless charging standard for a future iPhone? Ditto Samsung, who seem to always relegate Qi charging to a ‘special’ case? Sadly.

JP: Of course, we are not privy to the development plans of any of our members or other companies. Mobile phone makers, such as Samsung, have discovered that consumers are willing to spend a bit more for wireless charging technology. Accessories and add-on options are an important revenue generator for OEMs and service providers. But it’s only a matter of time before wireless charging is a basic feature on all portable devices.

SL: What smartphone do you use personally (please be honest!) – and does it have Qi charging?!

JP: My device of choice is the Nokia 1020 (good call! – SL) because I travel a lot and it has an excellent camera. I use a Nokia Qi case and I have Qi chargers all around me; a TYLT-vu in my office and by my bed, a Nokia charger with NFC in my car and I travel with a Qimini. 

Battery anxiety is one thing I don’t worry about.

_____________

Thanks to John and the WPC for the interview and I’m sure he’ll be happy to hear of happy Qi-using readers here. Any comments, everyone?

Filed: > >

Platforms: General, Windows Phone 8
Categories: Interviews, Comment, Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

All About Qi (charging): interview with John Perzow from the WPC

Published by at 12:44 UTC, July 25th 2014

As something of a fan of wireless charging in general and Qi in particular, I jumped at the chance to interview John Perzow, VP of market development at the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC), which created and is continually evolving the Qi standard. A man to answer some of those questions I’d been wanting to ask for ages….

Hi John, welcome to AAWP!

John Perzow

Steve Litchfield (SL): It seems that we’ve been talking about Qi winning in the wireless charging standards war for several years, yet the Powermat people in the USA still seem to talk as if they’re the natural choice, with installations in travel lounges, etc. All this despite Qi being used in the vast majority of wirelessly chargeable devices. What will it take to finally make Qi the standard?

John Perzow (JP): There are over 500 different types of Qi-enabled products and an installed base of over 50 million Qi units in the market today. What makes Qi unique is that it has a presence in public venues all around the world. There are over 200 members that have adopted Qi technology, including big names such as LG, Samsung, Sony, Philips, Panasonic and Verizon.

Qi has the highest efficiency, lowest cost and the greatest variety of options available. If your car has wireless charging built in, it’s Qi. Qi continues to evolve with more products, services and technology. There is no advantage with any other approach, only more risk and higher cost. So, I think we keep doing what we’re doing. 

SL: How are we doing on QI installations around the world, in (public) physical venues? Have we moved on beyond ‘trials’ yet?

JP: The trial stage ended in 2009. Products available today are mature and effective. Qi deployment has, particularly in the last year, exploded in public venues and autos around the world. Members of the WPC have installed Qi technology into major airports, including in the U.S., China and Japan. There are over 800 charging locations in eight U.S. airports alone. Qi charge spots are also appearing in new locations, such as restaurants, schools and many other public venues in the U.S., Canada and Europe. WPC members are working hard every day to bring new products and business-friendly Qi-based systems to public locations worldwide.

SL: I’ve written in the past that Qi wireless charging is less efficient than traditional wired charging and, in my tests, have seen charging times about 30%-40% longer and greater heat generated. Do you have any accurate stats to put forward here? Surely, if everyone goes wireless then we’re wasting energy, as a species?(!)

JP: We at the WPC agree – designers have a responsibility to create the most efficient systems possible. From operating frequency to coil structure, Qi uses the most efficient design choices. Naturally, the early versions of wireless charging technology were less efficient than today’s systems. I’d say that they were running on average of 65 percent to 70 percent, which is similar to the first mobile phone chargers. But, like any good standard, Qi technology is always evolving. Qi products on the market today exceed 80 percent efficiency, which approaches wired charging. Qi has several technologies available and the close-coupled version is the most efficient and lowest cost wireless charging system available anywhere. Qi can be even more efficient than wired (according to Texas Instruments) when fully integrated into the cell phone charging architecture. 

If wireless charge spots are available wherever we need them to be, we can reduce or eliminate chargers with every new phone. We can even cut the size of the Lithium-ion battery. These changes would result in meaningful environmental benefits.

Nokia's charging pad

SL: What’s the future for Qi, technically? And will whatever comes next be completely backwards compatible with today’s implementations?

JP: Members of the WPC are driving numerous important technology advancements, including power transfer up to 2000 watts for kitchen appliances and finely-tuned resonance technology for infrastructure, furniture and other types of applications. Also in development are medium power systems for notebook computing – and there’s a lot more to come. Fundamental to any real standard is backward compatibility and interoperability. If it bears the Qi logo, it will work, today and tomorrow, no matter the manufacture. 

SL: Do you have any sense of whether Apple will ever embrace any wireless charging standard for a future iPhone? Ditto Samsung, who seem to always relegate Qi charging to a ‘special’ case? Sadly.

JP: Of course, we are not privy to the development plans of any of our members or other companies. Mobile phone makers, such as Samsung, have discovered that consumers are willing to spend a bit more for wireless charging technology. Accessories and add-on options are an important revenue generator for OEMs and service providers. But it’s only a matter of time before wireless charging is a basic feature on all portable devices.

SL: What smartphone do you use personally (please be honest!) – and does it have Qi charging?!

JP: My device of choice is the Nokia 1020 (good call! – SL) because I travel a lot and it has an excellent camera. I use a Nokia Qi case and I have Qi chargers all around me; a TYLT-vu in my office and by my bed, a Nokia charger with NFC in my car and I travel with a Qimini. 

Battery anxiety is one thing I don’t worry about.

_____________

Thanks to John and the WPC for the interview and I’m sure he’ll be happy to hear of happy Qi-using readers here. Any comments, everyone?

Filed: > >

Platforms: General, Windows Phone 8
Categories: Interviews, Comment, Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

Thinking about how we use OneNote, an inspiring example from education

Published by at 9:46 UTC, July 22nd 2014

Do you use OneNote as your main receptacle of ideas and archived material? Or to collaborate with others? Or perhaps you use Evernote or similar? Comments welcome. Though I was quite inspired by the video embedded below, posted recently on YouTube by the Microsoft Office team, showing how OneNote is used in a school in the USA in an all-inclusive, all-IT environment, to help kids learn and teachers monitor progress.

From the video description:

Take a look at how the teachers at Cary Academy in Cary, North Carolina, seamlessly integrate OneNote into their classrooms to elevate the education of students through presentation, organization, and real-time collaboration with both students and other educators. 

Office365 is also mentioned, plus I should say that there’s very little on phones here, but then OneNote is fully portable between PCs, tablets and phones, so at the very least this might get you thinking about what you use OneNote for?

Notable is that all the laptops being used seem to have touchscreens, so thery’re high end – the cost of issuing these to classes of 30 kids at a time shouldn’t be underestimated, though the long term benefits are evident.

Also, is it just me, or do those kids look rather young to be learning that rather advanced maths?

Source / Credit: YouTube

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Link of Interest, Apps, Video
 

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