Tag Archives: Lumia

The Nokia Lumia 1020 FAQ for Windows 10 Mobile

[Of course, the feature here has been based on the latest build 10149 of the OS – it’s possible that some things will change before the final release. Just sayin’….!]

Lumia 1020 camera island

What camera applications come with Windows 10 Mobile?

It depends on which device you have – it seems that the ‘Nokia’-branded phones above a certain specification will retain ‘Lumia Camera’ (in fact, in the current build it’s still called ‘Nokia Camera’ initially, until it’s replaced in the Store with the new name), as well as ‘Camera’, a clear derivative of Lumia Camera 5.x but adapted for as wide a device pool as possible. Lumia Camera contains extra ‘smarts’ that know how to handle the extra microphones and optics in some models. 

However, Lumia Camera for Windows 10 Mobile ends up as v4.9.4.1, i.e. exactly the same as you’re currently using under Windows Phone 8.1. So it seems as though you can carry on as before – nothing need change. 

Interestingly, (Windows) Camera gives its version number as v5.38.2004.0, indicating an evolution of Lumia Camera 5 (still on v5.0.2.51 on the Lumia 930 etc.), though it’s clever enough to handle each device on its own merits in terms of ‘Rich Capture’ – the 1020’s mechanical shutter and slow capture mean that this feature simply wouldn’t work – and so it’s not offered.

So I can carry on using ‘Dual Capture’, PureView zooming, ‘Reframing’, and shooting RAW?

Absolutely. Your default camera is set to Lumia Camera (v4) still, and all the same options are there in the interface, settings, and even the hooks from Windows 10 Photos into Lumia Creative Studio (which hasn’t changed). Ditto shooting RAW (.DNG) files and sucking them out via cable with Windows Explorer, Nokia Photo Transfer or similar.

It’s business as usual!

What happens if I use (Windows) Camera instead? Is snapping much faster?

This (Camera) does start fractionally quicker, though it’s still three seconds before the viewfinder is fully live, so there’s no significant gain. And, probably due to debug code still in place, there’s a noticeable shutter lag at present on the Lumia 1020. PLUS, it always capture at the maximum resolution of the sensor – and I suspect that you don’t really want to be snapping 10MB 34MP images all day long, so you can discount this application for the 1020.

The big misconception was that a next generation camera application would somehow speed up the 1020 camera dramatically, but (short of a low resolution scrape of the sensor) the bottleneck is still grabbing 38MP worth of data and then saving it. So you’ll have to live with the 1020’s (lack of) speed and, as usual, console yourself with quality!

1Shot

1Shot in action, just zoom to whatever resolution you want, it’s a lossless way of working and rather interesting!

Will Lumia Camera stay available throughout the 1020’s life and Windows 10 Mobile?

Admittedly this app has disappeared a few times in the past year in the Store for some devices, but these have only been temporary lapses – there’s no reason to suspect that it needs to be withdrawn for any reason in the long term. And even if it did (get withdrawn), ‘Nokia Camera’ is still part of the firmware builds provisioned for the 1020, so you’d always have this to fall back on, with much the same functionality.

And even if the above wasn’t enough for you, other third party camera applications continue to work well under Windows 10 Mobile – I’ve been testing 1Shot and ProShot, but I’m sure the multitude of (less serious) camera apps will work fine too.

ProShot

ProShot in action, here set to capture at 12MP, one of its many modes….

What about video capture? And what’s all this about ‘Digital Stabilisation’?

There’s an odd setting in the simplified pane in (Windows) Camera for Windows 10 Mobile – a toggle for ‘digital stabilisation’. Which seems somewhat unnecessary given the massive, famous ball-bearing OIS integrated into the 1020 camera. My guess is that this is intended to help on the budget smartphones which lack OIS and that it should be hidden when the application is run on more capable devices.

Windows Camera

Some of the few settings in (Windows) Camera…

However, never one to rely on a guess when I could be testing it for real, I pointed my test 1020 out the window and ‘zoomed’ in on detail in a house about 200m away, looking at the stability under both applications:

From what I see above, the ‘digital stabilisation’ setting does nothing whatsoever on the 1020 – which is what I’d want, since OIS is going to be superior and you wouldn’t want two stabilisation systems ‘fighting each other’… Phew!

Other factors

So the bottom line for imaging is that nothing will really change. Of course, Windows 10 Mobile as an interface and OS has improvements galore, but mainly for the higher resolution screened phones and the newer chipsets. On the Lumia 1020, the OS is a bit of a ‘curate’s egg’ at the moment – but I suspect that optimisations for the 720p and 768p screens (and lower) are next on Microsoft’s agenda, so I’ll keep this 1020 up to date and report back.

There are no major showstoppers to anyone else upgrading to the Windows 10 Mobile Insider build on the 1020, but equally there’s little reason to do so in the first place. If I were you I’d wait for the official over-the-air ‘preserving all your apps and settings’ update in September or October.

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All About Windows Phone

Where does Denim and the new Lumia Camera leave the 1020?

Published by at 14:43 UTC, September 8th 2014

We’ve heard a lot about PureView imaging, a new, faster Lumia Camera application, Moment Capture, Dynamic Flash and Rich Capture, buzzwords aplenty over the last few days at IFA 2014. And the mix of all of this in the upcoming ultra-slim Lumia 830 does looks very tempting. But I thought a few words about what will and what won’t happen to the existing imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020, might be in order.

The story so far:

  • 2012: The Nokia 808 PureView is launched, with a huge 1/1.2″ hardware-accelerated 41MP oversampling camera, with shot to shot times a fraction of a second. Imaging is very well respected, there’s Xenon flash too, but it’s the tail end of the ever-less-supported Symbian OS and ecosystem.

    1020 and 808
      

  • 2013: The Nokia Lumia 1020 is launched, with a slightly smaller 1/1.5″ sensored 41MP camera, implementing much the same algorithms (plus the ability to reframe from the full image later) but handled by the phone’s main processor, resulting in shot to shot times as high as four seconds. There’s Xenon flash again, though(!), plus OIS, which helps. Again, the 1020 is at the tail end of a platform, this time the Snapdragon S4 range within Windows Phone, resulting in generally slow performance even when not in the main camera application.
      
  • end-2013/start 2014: The Lumia 1520, then Lumia Icon and 930 were launched, with a 1/2.5″ 21MP sensor that has similar functionality to the 1020 but with the next-gen Snapdragons powering the image processing and only half as much image data to handle at a time, resulting in shot to shot times of just less than one second. OIS, but only LED flash though.

The smartphone imaging fan in me, at this point, wanted to see Nokia – or rather Microsoft these days – attempt to reimagine the 1020, updating it with a Snapdragon 800 or 801, and bringing shot to shot times down to around a second (just my estimate). With the Xenon flash, the PureView zoom, the high end oversampling, plus the new chipset meaning that Windows Phone itself didn’t behave too badly, we’d have something of an outright winner.

Alas no. While it’s possible that such a device – say, the mythical Lumia 1030 – might be released, looking at the tea leaves in the mobile industry (the top Android smartphones and the iPhone have moved to computational photography, taking multiple shots very fast and then doing clever things with them) I’d say that this is now very unlikely, especially with Microsoft in charge and less scope for Finnish quirky extravagance.

  • September 2014: Microsoft launches the Nokia Lumia 830, with 10MP ‘PureView’ camera that has OIS but only a small 1/3.4″ sensor and no oversampling at all. The key benefits here are supposed to be the ‘Dynamic flash’ (achieved through taking a shot without LED flash and then very quickly taking another with) and ‘Rich capture’ (similarly, taking several shots at different exposures very quickly and then letting the user merge these as required).
    Lumia 830 back view

Leaving aside my worries that all these techniques (on the 830 and on other competing phones) utterly rely on the subject not moving at all (so a laughing or giggling subject would be blurred, etc.), the trend in the industry is clear – never mind the physics, make a camera that’s barely good enough but which is thin enough to fit in a phone only 8mm or so thick and then use burst mode techniques to let users get creative with the results.

Part of the ‘Denim’ platform update, the new ‘Lumia Camera’ application, according to Microsoft, is a revision of Nokia Camera (Lumia Camera was being called ‘Lumia Camera 5’ on the Microsoft demo stands, while the current Nokia Camera is up to v4.8) and enables:

  • shot to shot time of only a small fraction of a second
  • bursts of 4K or 2K video (depending on hardware) and then stripping out still ‘moments’ for use as photos
  • dynamic flash and rich capture functions, depending on whether the LED flash is enabled or not in the interface

Microsoft did say that the new application will be on the Lumia 830, hopefully at launch, plus will be coming to the 1520, Icon and 930 in due course. Now, the obvious question is what about all the relatively time consuming oversampling on the latter three devices. How can we have tiny shot to shot time when there are so many pixels to process? Is the oversampling being quietly forgotten?

It turns out (according to Juha, still on the imaging team and now at Microsoft) that the processors in the 1520, Icon and 930 are powerful enough that oversampling can be done in the background. On the 830, the shot is simply taken, encoded to JPG and stored in the background, while on the slightly older devices the shot gets taken and then UI immediately returned for the user to take another photo, while the quad core Snapdragon 800 chipset chugs away behind the scenes, performing the usual oversampling and encoding. 

With such a schema, Juha estimates that the 1520 (et al) will be capable of two to three shots per second. Not as fast as the likes of the HTC One devices, but still fast enough for almost all users. And yet with the oversampling still in place.

Lumia 1020 camera

So. What about the imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020? The Snapdragon S4 is significantly less powerful, plus there’s twice as much image data to handle and up to four times as much oversampling processing – this is the reason why the new Lumia Camera functions won’t be available for the 1020 – there’s not enough oomph available to do all the background processing required. Juha confirmed that ‘achieving smooth experience would be very difficult’. To say the least.

There’s little point then, in complaining about the speed of the 1020 camera or that Lumia Camera/Denim’s functions won’t be backported. If you must have the 41MP sensor and Xenon and speed then the old Nokia 808 is still available! If you can live without Xenon and oversampling then the new Lumia 830 looks like a good bet. If you want a good compromise, with some oversampling, good speed and can live with LED flash, then the Lumia 930 is probably the best option. or the 1520 if you fancy veering into ‘phablet’ territory (the 1520 is a great device).

Having established that there’s little point in complaining – the 1020, based on a 2012 chipset, is limited by its own specs and physics – there’s an extra option, of course. Live with the 1020 as-is, producing nigh on perfect oversampled images, getting crisp Xenon-frozen social snaps, and so on. All it requires is a little patience in terms of startup and shot to shot time. It could be argued that it’s all about planning ahead?

As the Rolling Stones once sang, ‘you can’t always get what you want, but you might just get what you need’. Interpret that whichever way you want to and let us know if you’re going to stick with the 1020 or move on, in the comments below!

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: How To, Comment
 

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All About Windows Phone

Where does Denim and the new Lumia Camera leave the 1020?

Published by at 14:43 UTC, September 8th 2014

We’ve heard a lot about PureView imaging, a new, faster Lumia Camera application, Moment Capture, Dynamic Flash and Rich Capture, buzzwords aplenty over the last few days at IFA 2014. And the mix of all of this in the upcoming ultra-slim Lumia 830 does looks very tempting. But I thought a few words about what will and what won’t happen to the existing imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020, might be in order.

The story so far:

  • 2012: The Nokia 808 PureView is launched, with a huge 1/1.2″ hardware-accelerated 41MP oversampling camera, with shot to shot times a fraction of a second. Imaging is very well respected, there’s Xenon flash too, but it’s the tail end of the ever-less-supported Symbian OS and ecosystem.

    1020 and 808
      

  • 2013: The Nokia Lumia 1020 is launched, with a slightly smaller 1/1.5″ sensored 41MP camera, implementing much the same algorithms (plus the ability to reframe from the full image later) but handled by the phone’s main processor, resulting in shot to shot times as high as four seconds. There’s Xenon flash again, though(!), plus OIS, which helps. Again, the 1020 is at the tail end of a platform, this time the Snapdragon S4 range within Windows Phone, resulting in generally slow performance even when not in the main camera application.
      
  • end-2013/start 2014: The Lumia 1520, then Lumia Icon and 930 were launched, with a 1/2.5″ 21MP sensor that has similar functionality to the 1020 but with the next-gen Snapdragons powering the image processing and only half as much image data to handle at a time, resulting in shot to shot times of just less than one second. OIS, but only LED flash though.

The smartphone imaging fan in me, at this point, wanted to see Nokia – or rather Microsoft these days – attempt to reimagine the 1020, updating it with a Snapdragon 800 or 801, and bringing shot to shot times down to around a second (just my estimate). With the Xenon flash, the PureView zoom, the high end oversampling, plus the new chipset meaning that Windows Phone itself didn’t behave too badly, we’d have something of an outright winner.

Alas no. While it’s possible that such a device – say, the mythical Lumia 1030 – might be released, looking at the tea leaves in the mobile industry (the top Android smartphones and the iPhone have moved to computational photography, taking multiple shots very fast and then doing clever things with them) I’d say that this is now very unlikely, especially with Microsoft in charge and less scope for Finnish quirky extravagance.

  • September 2014: Microsoft launches the Nokia Lumia 830, with 10MP ‘PureView’ camera that has OIS but only a small 1/3.4″ sensor and no oversampling at all. The key benefits here are supposed to be the ‘Dynamic flash’ (achieved through taking a shot without LED flash and then very quickly taking another with) and ‘Rich capture’ (similarly, taking several shots at different exposures very quickly and then letting the user merge these as required).
    Lumia 830 back view

Leaving aside my worries that all these techniques (on the 830 and on other competing phones) utterly rely on the subject not moving at all (so a laughing or giggling subject would be blurred, etc.), the trend in the industry is clear – never mind the physics, make a camera that’s barely good enough but which is thin enough to fit in a phone only 8mm or so thick and then use burst mode techniques to let users get creative with the results.

Part of the ‘Denim’ platform update, the new ‘Lumia Camera’ application, according to Microsoft, is a revision of Nokia Camera (Lumia Camera was being called ‘Lumia Camera 5’ on the Microsoft demo stands, while the current Nokia Camera is up to v4.8) and enables:

  • shot to shot time of only a small fraction of a second
  • bursts of 4K or 2K video (depending on hardware) and then stripping out still ‘moments’ for use as photos
  • dynamic flash and rich capture functions, depending on whether the LED flash is enabled or not in the interface

Microsoft did say that the new application will be on the Lumia 830, hopefully at launch, plus will be coming to the 1520, Icon and 930 in due course. Now, the obvious question is what about all the relatively time consuming oversampling on the latter three devices. How can we have tiny shot to shot time when there are so many pixels to process? Is the oversampling being quietly forgotten?

It turns out (according to Juha, still on the imaging team and now at Microsoft) that the processors in the 1520, Icon and 930 are powerful enough that oversampling can be done in the background. On the 830, the shot is simply taken, encoded to JPG and stored in the background, while on the slightly older devices the shot gets taken and then UI immediately returned for the user to take another photo, while the quad core Snapdragon 800 chipset chugs away behind the scenes, performing the usual oversampling and encoding. 

With such a schema, Juha estimates that the 1520 (et al) will be capable of two to three shots per second. Not as fast as the likes of the HTC One devices, but still fast enough for almost all users. And yet with the oversampling still in place.

Lumia 1020 camera

So. What about the imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020? The Snapdragon S4 is significantly less powerful, plus there’s twice as much image data to handle and up to four times as much oversampling processing – this is the reason why the new Lumia Camera functions won’t be available for the 1020 – there’s not enough oomph available to do all the background processing required. Juha confirmed that ‘achieving smooth experience would be very difficult’. To say the least.

There’s little point then, in complaining about the speed of the 1020 camera or that Lumia Camera/Denim’s functions won’t be backported. If you must have the 41MP sensor and Xenon and speed then the old Nokia 808 is still available! If you can live without Xenon and oversampling then the new Lumia 830 looks like a good bet. If you want a good compromise, with some oversampling, good speed and can live with LED flash, then the Lumia 930 is probably the best option. or the 1520 if you fancy veering into ‘phablet’ territory (the 1520 is a great device).

Having established that there’s little point in complaining – the 1020, based on a 2012 chipset, is limited by its own specs and physics – there’s an extra option, of course. Live with the 1020 as-is, producing nigh on perfect oversampled images, getting crisp Xenon-frozen social snaps, and so on. All it requires is a little patience in terms of startup and shot to shot time. It could be argued that it’s all about planning ahead?

As the Rolling Stones once sang, ‘you can’t always get what you want, but you might just get what you need’. Interpret that whichever way you want to and let us know if you’re going to stick with the 1020 or move on, in the comments below!

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: How To, Comment
 

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All About Windows Phone

Where does Denim and the new Lumia Camera leave the 1020?

Published by at 14:43 UTC, September 8th 2014

We’ve heard a lot about PureView imaging, a new, faster Lumia Camera application, Moment Capture, Dynamic Flash and Rich Capture, buzzwords aplenty over the last few days at IFA 2014. And the mix of all of this in the upcoming ultra-slim Lumia 830 does looks very tempting. But I thought a few words about what will and what won’t happen to the existing imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020, might be in order.

The story so far:

  • 2012: The Nokia 808 PureView is launched, with a huge 1/1.2″ hardware-accelerated 41MP oversampling camera, with shot to shot times a fraction of a second. Imaging is very well respected, there’s Xenon flash too, but it’s the tail end of the ever-less-supported Symbian OS and ecosystem.

    1020 and 808
      

  • 2013: The Nokia Lumia 1020 is launched, with a slightly smaller 1/1.5″ sensored 41MP camera, implementing much the same algorithms (plus the ability to reframe from the full image later) but handled by the phone’s main processor, resulting in shot to shot times as high as four seconds. There’s Xenon flash again, though(!), plus OIS, which helps. Again, the 1020 is at the tail end of a platform, this time the Snapdragon S4 range within Windows Phone, resulting in generally slow performance even when not in the main camera application.
      
  • end-2013/start 2014: The Lumia 1520, then Lumia Icon and 930 were launched, with a 1/2.5″ 21MP sensor that has similar functionality to the 1020 but with the next-gen Snapdragons powering the image processing and only half as much image data to handle at a time, resulting in shot to shot times of just less than one second. OIS, but only LED flash though.

The smartphone imaging fan in me, at this point, wanted to see Nokia – or rather Microsoft these days – attempt to reimagine the 1020, updating it with a Snapdragon 800 or 801, and bringing shot to shot times down to around a second (just my estimate). With the Xenon flash, the PureView zoom, the high end oversampling, plus the new chipset meaning that Windows Phone itself didn’t behave too badly, we’d have something of an outright winner.

Alas no. While it’s possible that such a device – say, the mythical Lumia 1030 – might be released, looking at the tea leaves in the mobile industry (the top Android smartphones and the iPhone have moved to computational photography, taking multiple shots very fast and then doing clever things with them) I’d say that this is now very unlikely, especially with Microsoft in charge and less scope for Finnish quirky extravagance.

  • September 2014: Microsoft launches the Nokia Lumia 830, with 10MP ‘PureView’ camera that has OIS but only a small 1/3.4″ sensor and no oversampling at all. The key benefits here are supposed to be the ‘Dynamic flash’ (achieved through taking a shot without LED flash and then very quickly taking another with) and ‘Rich capture’ (similarly, taking several shots at different exposures very quickly and then letting the user merge these as required).
    Lumia 830 back view

Leaving aside my worries that all these techniques (on the 830 and on other competing phones) utterly rely on the subject not moving at all (so a laughing or giggling subject would be blurred, etc.), the trend in the industry is clear – never mind the physics, make a camera that’s barely good enough but which is thin enough to fit in a phone only 8mm or so thick and then use burst mode techniques to let users get creative with the results.

Part of the ‘Denim’ platform update, the new ‘Lumia Camera’ application, according to Microsoft, is a revision of Nokia Camera (Lumia Camera was being called ‘Lumia Camera 5’ on the Microsoft demo stands, while the current Nokia Camera is up to v4.8) and enables:

  • shot to shot time of only a small fraction of a second
  • bursts of 4K or 2K video (depending on hardware) and then stripping out still ‘moments’ for use as photos
  • dynamic flash and rich capture functions, depending on whether the LED flash is enabled or not in the interface

Microsoft did say that the new application will be on the Lumia 830, hopefully at launch, plus will be coming to the 1520, Icon and 930 in due course. Now, the obvious question is what about all the relatively time consuming oversampling on the latter three devices. How can we have tiny shot to shot time when there are so many pixels to process? Is the oversampling being quietly forgotten?

It turns out (according to Juha, still on the imaging team and now at Microsoft) that the processors in the 1520, Icon and 930 are powerful enough that oversampling can be done in the background. On the 830, the shot is simply taken, encoded to JPG and stored in the background, while on the slightly older devices the shot gets taken and then UI immediately returned for the user to take another photo, while the quad core Snapdragon 800 chipset chugs away behind the scenes, performing the usual oversampling and encoding. 

With such a schema, Juha estimates that the 1520 (et al) will be capable of two to three shots per second. Not as fast as the likes of the HTC One devices, but still fast enough for almost all users. And yet with the oversampling still in place.

Lumia 1020 camera

So. What about the imaging flagship, the Lumia 1020? The Snapdragon S4 is significantly less powerful, plus there’s twice as much image data to handle and up to four times as much oversampling processing – this is the reason why the new Lumia Camera functions won’t be available for the 1020 – there’s not enough oomph available to do all the background processing required. Juha confirmed that ‘achieving smooth experience would be very difficult’. To say the least.

There’s little point then, in complaining about the speed of the 1020 camera or that Lumia Camera/Denim’s functions won’t be backported. If you must have the 41MP sensor and Xenon and speed then the old Nokia 808 is still available! If you can live without Xenon and oversampling then the new Lumia 830 looks like a good bet. If you want a good compromise, with some oversampling, good speed and can live with LED flash, then the Lumia 930 is probably the best option. or the 1520 if you fancy veering into ‘phablet’ territory (the 1520 is a great device).

Having established that there’s little point in complaining – the 1020, based on a 2012 chipset, is limited by its own specs and physics – there’s an extra option, of course. Live with the 1020 as-is, producing nigh on perfect oversampled images, getting crisp Xenon-frozen social snaps, and so on. All it requires is a little patience in terms of startup and shot to shot time. It could be argued that it’s all about planning ahead?

As the Rolling Stones once sang, ‘you can’t always get what you want, but you might just get what you need’. Interpret that whichever way you want to and let us know if you’re going to stick with the 1020 or move on, in the comments below!

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: How To, Comment
 

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All About Windows Phone

Nokia Glam Me becomes Lumia Selfie, gets polished and whitened

Published by at 7:15 UTC, September 6th 2014

A more polished version of its previous incarnation, Nokia Glam Me (which was a horrible name), the new Lumia Selfie (also a horrible name, but at least its trendy)  works surprisingly well and is destined to be shipped on the Start screen of newer devices like the 730. It’s also available (as was Glam Me) for all Lumias with front-facing cameras, of course. 

In fact, it’s possibly installable on devices with only rear cameras, in view of the back camera and auto-line-up support, comments welcome if you try this.

Lumia Selfie is recognisable as an updated version of Glam Me, but there has been quite a bit of work to improve it, in terms of icons, explanatory text, efficacy of effects, operation of the audio alignment section, and so on.

From the updated Store description:

Lumia Selfie is the perfect app for taking selfies with your front or main camera and sharing them with your friends.
It’s so simple to capture the perfect picture of yourself, automatically enhanced and ready to share straight away.
You can also fine-tune your facial details and apply high quality effects.

Although, as with Glam Me, the application occasionally refused to recognise my face because it didn’t like my glasses, the algorithms have obviously been tuned and most of the time I got good results. There’s something somewhat magical about seeing your eyes enlarged, your smile made happier and your teeth whiter (hey, it’s cheaper than going to the dental hygienest, etc.), even if the end result ends up looking rather unnatural!

Here’s Lumia Selfie in action:

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Step 1 is to take the selfie photo – the app defaults to the front facing camera, obviously… step 2 is to select your filter – here I’m experimenting with ‘reflect’, about another dozen  arty filters are available to play with… Also, note that slimming and other facial enhancements have already been applied – by default Lumia selfie automatically applies whatever you did to the last selfie you processed.

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Browsing through all the filters available in one handy pane; (right) in the ‘enhancements’ section, setting a slider for each facial feature – here whitening my teeth! The end results are rarely that natural – maybe the secret is to be more restrained with the sliders, Steve!

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

The help text – note the timer reference – the timer options have all been lengthened compared to Glam Me, to give users more time to set shots up; (right) about to try the rear camera ‘auto selfie’ – the rapid beeps and then steady tone work very well in practice.

I did notice the odd minor bug, in that with multiple effects turned on, their overall effect was a little erratic as I adjusted individual sliders. Still, you can download Lumia Selfie for free in the Store here and try it for yourself. Effectively Nokia Glam Me has itself had its smile enhanced and teeth whitened!

Source / Credit: Windows Phone Store

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Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Apps
 

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All About Windows Phone

Nokia Glam Me becomes Lumia Selfie, gets polished and whitened

Published by at 7:15 UTC, September 6th 2014

A more polished version of its previous incarnation, Nokia Glam Me (which was a horrible name), the new Lumia Selfie (also a horrible name, but at least its trendy)  works surprisingly well and is destined to be shipped on the Start screen of newer devices like the 730. It’s also available (as was Glam Me) for all Lumias with front-facing cameras, of course. 

In fact, it’s possibly installable on devices with only rear cameras, in view of the back camera and auto-line-up support, comments welcome if you try this.

Lumia Selfie is recognisable as an updated version of Glam Me, but there has been quite a bit of work to improve it, in terms of icons, explanatory text, efficacy of effects, operation of the audio alignment section, and so on.

From the updated Store description:

Lumia Selfie is the perfect app for taking selfies with your front or main camera and sharing them with your friends.
It’s so simple to capture the perfect picture of yourself, automatically enhanced and ready to share straight away.
You can also fine-tune your facial details and apply high quality effects.

Although, as with Glam Me, the application occasionally refused to recognise my face because it didn’t like my glasses, the algorithms have obviously been tuned and most of the time I got good results. There’s something somewhat magical about seeing your eyes enlarged, your smile made happier and your teeth whiter (hey, it’s cheaper than going to the dental hygienest, etc.), even if the end result ends up looking rather unnatural!

Here’s Lumia Selfie in action:

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Step 1 is to take the selfie photo – the app defaults to the front facing camera, obviously… step 2 is to select your filter – here I’m experimenting with ‘reflect’, about another dozen  arty filters are available to play with… Also, note that slimming and other facial enhancements have already been applied – by default Lumia selfie automatically applies whatever you did to the last selfie you processed.

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Browsing through all the filters available in one handy pane; (right) in the ‘enhancements’ section, setting a slider for each facial feature – here whitening my teeth! The end results are rarely that natural – maybe the secret is to be more restrained with the sliders, Steve!

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

The help text – note the timer reference – the timer options have all been lengthened compared to Glam Me, to give users more time to set shots up; (right) about to try the rear camera ‘auto selfie’ – the rapid beeps and then steady tone work very well in practice.

I did notice the odd minor bug, in that with multiple effects turned on, their overall effect was a little erratic as I adjusted individual sliders. Still, you can download Lumia Selfie for free in the Store here and try it for yourself. Effectively Nokia Glam Me has itself had its smile enhanced and teeth whitened!

Source / Credit: Windows Phone Store

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Apps
 

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All About Windows Phone

Nokia Glam Me becomes Lumia Selfie, gets polished and whitened

Published by at 7:15 UTC, September 6th 2014

A more polished version of its previous incarnation, Nokia Glam Me (which was a horrible name), the new Lumia Selfie (also a horrible name, but at least its trendy)  works surprisingly well and is destined to be shipped on the Start screen of newer devices like the 730. It’s also available (as was Glam Me) for all Lumias with front-facing cameras, of course. 

In fact, it’s possibly installable on devices with only rear cameras, in view of the back camera and auto-line-up support, comments welcome if you try this.

Lumia Selfie is recognisable as an updated version of Glam Me, but there has been quite a bit of work to improve it, in terms of icons, explanatory text, efficacy of effects, operation of the audio alignment section, and so on.

From the updated Store description:

Lumia Selfie is the perfect app for taking selfies with your front or main camera and sharing them with your friends.
It’s so simple to capture the perfect picture of yourself, automatically enhanced and ready to share straight away.
You can also fine-tune your facial details and apply high quality effects.

Although, as with Glam Me, the application occasionally refused to recognise my face because it didn’t like my glasses, the algorithms have obviously been tuned and most of the time I got good results. There’s something somewhat magical about seeing your eyes enlarged, your smile made happier and your teeth whiter (hey, it’s cheaper than going to the dental hygienest, etc.), even if the end result ends up looking rather unnatural!

Here’s Lumia Selfie in action:

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Step 1 is to take the selfie photo – the app defaults to the front facing camera, obviously… step 2 is to select your filter – here I’m experimenting with ‘reflect’, about another dozen  arty filters are available to play with… Also, note that slimming and other facial enhancements have already been applied – by default Lumia selfie automatically applies whatever you did to the last selfie you processed.

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Browsing through all the filters available in one handy pane; (right) in the ‘enhancements’ section, setting a slider for each facial feature – here whitening my teeth! The end results are rarely that natural – maybe the secret is to be more restrained with the sliders, Steve!

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

The help text – note the timer reference – the timer options have all been lengthened compared to Glam Me, to give users more time to set shots up; (right) about to try the rear camera ‘auto selfie’ – the rapid beeps and then steady tone work very well in practice.

I did notice the odd minor bug, in that with multiple effects turned on, their overall effect was a little erratic as I adjusted individual sliders. Still, you can download Lumia Selfie for free in the Store here and try it for yourself. Effectively Nokia Glam Me has itself had its smile enhanced and teeth whitened!

Source / Credit: Windows Phone Store

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Apps
 

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.


All About Windows Phone

Nokia Glam Me becomes Lumia Selfie, gets polished and whitened

Published by at 7:15 UTC, September 6th 2014

A more polished version of its previous incarnation, Nokia Glam Me (which was a horrible name), the new Lumia Selfie (also a horrible name, but at least its trendy)  works surprisingly well and is destined to be shipped on the Start screen of newer devices like the 730. It’s also available (as was Glam Me) for all Lumias with front-facing cameras, of course. 

In fact, it’s possibly installable on devices with only rear cameras, in view of the back camera and auto-line-up support, comments welcome if you try this.

Lumia Selfie is recognisable as an updated version of Glam Me, but there has been quite a bit of work to improve it, in terms of icons, explanatory text, efficacy of effects, operation of the audio alignment section, and so on.

From the updated Store description:

Lumia Selfie is the perfect app for taking selfies with your front or main camera and sharing them with your friends.
It’s so simple to capture the perfect picture of yourself, automatically enhanced and ready to share straight away.
You can also fine-tune your facial details and apply high quality effects.

Although, as with Glam Me, the application occasionally refused to recognise my face because it didn’t like my glasses, the algorithms have obviously been tuned and most of the time I got good results. There’s something somewhat magical about seeing your eyes enlarged, your smile made happier and your teeth whiter (hey, it’s cheaper than going to the dental hygienest, etc.), even if the end result ends up looking rather unnatural!

Here’s Lumia Selfie in action:

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Step 1 is to take the selfie photo – the app defaults to the front facing camera, obviously… step 2 is to select your filter – here I’m experimenting with ‘reflect’, about another dozen  arty filters are available to play with… Also, note that slimming and other facial enhancements have already been applied – by default Lumia selfie automatically applies whatever you did to the last selfie you processed.

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Browsing through all the filters available in one handy pane; (right) in the ‘enhancements’ section, setting a slider for each facial feature – here whitening my teeth! The end results are rarely that natural – maybe the secret is to be more restrained with the sliders, Steve!

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

The help text – note the timer reference – the timer options have all been lengthened compared to Glam Me, to give users more time to set shots up; (right) about to try the rear camera ‘auto selfie’ – the rapid beeps and then steady tone work very well in practice.

I did notice the odd minor bug, in that with multiple effects turned on, their overall effect was a little erratic as I adjusted individual sliders. Still, you can download Lumia Selfie for free in the Store here and try it for yourself. Effectively Nokia Glam Me has itself had its smile enhanced and teeth whitened!

Source / Credit: Windows Phone Store

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Apps
 

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.


All About Windows Phone

Nokia Glam Me becomes Lumia Selfie, gets polished and whitened

Published by at 7:15 UTC, September 6th 2014

A more polished version of its previous incarnation, Nokia Glam Me (which was a horrible name), the new Lumia Selfie (also a horrible name, but at least its trendy)  works surprisingly well and is destined to be shipped on the Start screen of newer devices like the 730. It’s also available (as was Glam Me) for all Lumias with front-facing cameras, of course. 

In fact, it’s possibly installable on devices with only rear cameras, in view of the back camera and auto-line-up support, comments welcome if you try this.

Lumia Selfie is recognisable as an updated version of Glam Me, but there has been quite a bit of work to improve it, in terms of icons, explanatory text, efficacy of effects, operation of the audio alignment section, and so on.

From the updated Store description:

Lumia Selfie is the perfect app for taking selfies with your front or main camera and sharing them with your friends.
It’s so simple to capture the perfect picture of yourself, automatically enhanced and ready to share straight away.
You can also fine-tune your facial details and apply high quality effects.

Although, as with Glam Me, the application occasionally refused to recognise my face because it didn’t like my glasses, the algorithms have obviously been tuned and most of the time I got good results. There’s something somewhat magical about seeing your eyes enlarged, your smile made happier and your teeth whiter (hey, it’s cheaper than going to the dental hygienest, etc.), even if the end result ends up looking rather unnatural!

Here’s Lumia Selfie in action:

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Step 1 is to take the selfie photo – the app defaults to the front facing camera, obviously… step 2 is to select your filter – here I’m experimenting with ‘reflect’, about another dozen  arty filters are available to play with… Also, note that slimming and other facial enhancements have already been applied – by default Lumia selfie automatically applies whatever you did to the last selfie you processed.

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Browsing through all the filters available in one handy pane; (right) in the ‘enhancements’ section, setting a slider for each facial feature – here whitening my teeth! The end results are rarely that natural – maybe the secret is to be more restrained with the sliders, Steve!

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

The help text – note the timer reference – the timer options have all been lengthened compared to Glam Me, to give users more time to set shots up; (right) about to try the rear camera ‘auto selfie’ – the rapid beeps and then steady tone work very well in practice.

I did notice the odd minor bug, in that with multiple effects turned on, their overall effect was a little erratic as I adjusted individual sliders. Still, you can download Lumia Selfie for free in the Store here and try it for yourself. Effectively Nokia Glam Me has itself had its smile enhanced and teeth whitened!

Source / Credit: Windows Phone Store

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Apps
 

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.


All About Windows Phone

Nokia Glam Me becomes Lumia Selfie, gets polished and whitened

Published by at 7:15 UTC, September 6th 2014

A more polished version of its previous incarnation, Nokia Glam Me (which was a horrible name), the new Lumia Selfie (also a horrible name, but at least its trendy)  works surprisingly well and is destined to be shipped on the Start screen of newer devices like the 730. It’s also available (as was Glam Me) for all Lumias with front-facing cameras, of course. 

In fact, it’s possibly installable on devices with only rear cameras, in view of the back camera and auto-line-up support, comments welcome if you try this.

Lumia Selfie is recognisable as an updated version of Glam Me, but there has been quite a bit of work to improve it, in terms of icons, explanatory text, efficacy of effects, operation of the audio alignment section, and so on.

From the updated Store description:

Lumia Selfie is the perfect app for taking selfies with your front or main camera and sharing them with your friends.
It’s so simple to capture the perfect picture of yourself, automatically enhanced and ready to share straight away.
You can also fine-tune your facial details and apply high quality effects.

Although, as with Glam Me, the application occasionally refused to recognise my face because it didn’t like my glasses, the algorithms have obviously been tuned and most of the time I got good results. There’s something somewhat magical about seeing your eyes enlarged, your smile made happier and your teeth whiter (hey, it’s cheaper than going to the dental hygienest, etc.), even if the end result ends up looking rather unnatural!

Here’s Lumia Selfie in action:

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Step 1 is to take the selfie photo – the app defaults to the front facing camera, obviously… step 2 is to select your filter – here I’m experimenting with ‘reflect’, about another dozen  arty filters are available to play with… Also, note that slimming and other facial enhancements have already been applied – by default Lumia selfie automatically applies whatever you did to the last selfie you processed.

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

Browsing through all the filters available in one handy pane; (right) in the ‘enhancements’ section, setting a slider for each facial feature – here whitening my teeth! The end results are rarely that natural – maybe the secret is to be more restrained with the sliders, Steve!

Lumia Selfie screenshotLumia Selfie screenshot

The help text – note the timer reference – the timer options have all been lengthened compared to Glam Me, to give users more time to set shots up; (right) about to try the rear camera ‘auto selfie’ – the rapid beeps and then steady tone work very well in practice.

I did notice the odd minor bug, in that with multiple effects turned on, their overall effect was a little erratic as I adjusted individual sliders. Still, you can download Lumia Selfie for free in the Store here and try it for yourself. Effectively Nokia Glam Me has itself had its smile enhanced and teeth whitened!

Source / Credit: Windows Phone Store

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Apps
 

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.


All About Windows Phone