Tag Archives: Microsoft

Microsoft launches the (Miracast) HD-10 Screen Sharing for Lumia

Published by at 10:23 UTC, September 4th 2014

Also launched at IFA 2014 by Microsoft was the HD-10, a Screen Sharing accessory for Lumia devices. Essentially a HDMI-connected Miracast dongle, this allows casting of screens and video streams to any suitable digital screen.

Microsoft HD-10

From the press release and data sheet:

Microsoft Screen Sharing For Lumia Phones lets people simply beam content from their smartphone to a HDMI-connected screen like a TV, and enjoy their smartphone content on a larger screen, making it perfect for reliving memories with friends and family, or for sharing presentations at work. 

Screen Sharing is designed for people who enjoy a lot of content on their phones – be it photos, videos, music, premium streaming movies, games, internet – and would like a simple, hassle-free way to get that same content onto a big screen for better viewing or for sharing with others.

With the smooth mirroring of everything on the phone on to a big screen, it can also be used for work. With a simple tap, people can work with documents and presentations and share them with a group. 

The set-up process is interesting here, with a ‘coaster’ that comes with the dongle and which is NFC enabled, containing the ID of the dongle. So, on Lumia phones you just tap the coaster and you’re paired and set-up and ready to ‘share’/cast.

In practice, there are bound to be some latency issues – the datasheet does admit that action games won’t provide a very good experience because of these delays.

The HD-10 is expected to be available in September 2014, and available from EUR 79 / USD 79.

Specifications:

  • Dimensions

    • Diameter: 80 mm
    • Thickness: 21 mm
    • Weight: 115 g
  • Connectivity

    • Other wireless connectivity: Screen projection, Wi-Fi CERTIFIED Miracast
    • Charging connectors: Micro-USB 
    • AV connectors: HDMI-A 
    • NFC: Connecting 
    • Wi-Fi: WLAN IEEE 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct
  • Usage

    • Video resolution: up to 1080p (Full HD, 1920 x 1080) 
    • LED indicators: Power on indicator 
  • Audio

    • Audio features: Up to LPCM 5.1 surround sound 

As usual, there’s a promo video (rather concentrating on what you can’t do, rather than what you can do, but….!)

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

Microsoft launches the (Miracast) HD-10 Screen Sharing for Lumia

Published by at 10:23 UTC, September 4th 2014

Also launched at IFA 2014 by Microsoft was the HD-10, a Screen Sharing accessory for Lumia devices. Essentially a HDMI-connected Miracast dongle, this allows casting of screens and video streams to any suitable digital screen.

Microsoft HD-10

From the press release and data sheet:

Microsoft Screen Sharing For Lumia Phones lets people simply beam content from their smartphone to a HDMI-connected screen like a TV, and enjoy their smartphone content on a larger screen, making it perfect for reliving memories with friends and family, or for sharing presentations at work. 

Screen Sharing is designed for people who enjoy a lot of content on their phones – be it photos, videos, music, premium streaming movies, games, internet – and would like a simple, hassle-free way to get that same content onto a big screen for better viewing or for sharing with others.

With the smooth mirroring of everything on the phone on to a big screen, it can also be used for work. With a simple tap, people can work with documents and presentations and share them with a group. 

The set-up process is interesting here, with a ‘coaster’ that comes with the dongle and which is NFC enabled, containing the ID of the dongle. So, on Lumia phones you just tap the coaster and you’re paired and set-up and ready to ‘share’/cast.

In practice, there are bound to be some latency issues – the datasheet does admit that action games won’t provide a very good experience because of these delays.

The HD-10 is expected to be available in September 2014, and available from EUR 79 / USD 79.

Specifications:

  • Dimensions

    • Diameter: 80 mm
    • Thickness: 21 mm
    • Weight: 115 g
  • Connectivity

    • Other wireless connectivity: Screen projection, Wi-Fi CERTIFIED Miracast
    • Charging connectors: Micro-USB 
    • AV connectors: HDMI-A 
    • NFC: Connecting 
    • Wi-Fi: WLAN IEEE 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct
  • Usage

    • Video resolution: up to 1080p (Full HD, 1920 x 1080) 
    • LED indicators: Power on indicator 
  • Audio

    • Audio features: Up to LPCM 5.1 surround sound 

As usual, there’s a promo video (rather concentrating on what you can’t do, rather than what you can do, but….!)

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

Microsoft launches the (Miracast) HD-10 Screen Sharing for Lumia

Published by at 10:23 UTC, September 4th 2014

Also launched at IFA 2014 by Microsoft was the HD-10, a Screen Sharing accessory for Lumia devices. Essentially a HDMI-connected Miracast dongle, this allows casting of screens and video streams to any suitable digital screen.

Microsoft HD-10

From the press release and data sheet:

Microsoft Screen Sharing For Lumia Phones lets people simply beam content from their smartphone to a HDMI-connected screen like a TV, and enjoy their smartphone content on a larger screen, making it perfect for reliving memories with friends and family, or for sharing presentations at work. 

Screen Sharing is designed for people who enjoy a lot of content on their phones – be it photos, videos, music, premium streaming movies, games, internet – and would like a simple, hassle-free way to get that same content onto a big screen for better viewing or for sharing with others.

With the smooth mirroring of everything on the phone on to a big screen, it can also be used for work. With a simple tap, people can work with documents and presentations and share them with a group. 

The set-up process is interesting here, with a ‘coaster’ that comes with the dongle and which is NFC enabled, containing the ID of the dongle. So, on Lumia phones you just tap the coaster and you’re paired and set-up and ready to ‘share’/cast.

In practice, there are bound to be some latency issues – the datasheet does admit that action games won’t provide a very good experience because of these delays.

The HD-10 is expected to be available in September 2014, and available from EUR 79 / USD 79.

Specifications:

  • Dimensions

    • Diameter: 80 mm
    • Thickness: 21 mm
    • Weight: 115 g
  • Connectivity

    • Other wireless connectivity: Screen projection, Wi-Fi CERTIFIED Miracast
    • Charging connectors: Micro-USB 
    • AV connectors: HDMI-A 
    • NFC: Connecting 
    • Wi-Fi: WLAN IEEE 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct
  • Usage

    • Video resolution: up to 1080p (Full HD, 1920 x 1080) 
    • LED indicators: Power on indicator 
  • Audio

    • Audio features: Up to LPCM 5.1 surround sound 

As usual, there’s a promo video (rather concentrating on what you can’t do, rather than what you can do, but….!)

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Hardware
 

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.


All About Windows Phone

Microsoft launches the (Miracast) HD-10 Screen Sharing for Lumia

Published by at 10:23 UTC, September 4th 2014

Also launched at IFA 2014 by Microsoft was the HD-10, a Screen Sharing accessory for Lumia devices. Essentially a HDMI-connected Miracast dongle, this allows casting of screens and video streams to any suitable digital screen.

Microsoft HD-10

From the press release and data sheet:

Microsoft Screen Sharing For Lumia Phones lets people simply beam content from their smartphone to a HDMI-connected screen like a TV, and enjoy their smartphone content on a larger screen, making it perfect for reliving memories with friends and family, or for sharing presentations at work. 

Screen Sharing is designed for people who enjoy a lot of content on their phones – be it photos, videos, music, premium streaming movies, games, internet – and would like a simple, hassle-free way to get that same content onto a big screen for better viewing or for sharing with others.

With the smooth mirroring of everything on the phone on to a big screen, it can also be used for work. With a simple tap, people can work with documents and presentations and share them with a group. 

The set-up process is interesting here, with a ‘coaster’ that comes with the dongle and which is NFC enabled, containing the ID of the dongle. So, on Lumia phones you just tap the coaster and you’re paired and set-up and ready to ‘share’/cast.

In practice, there are bound to be some latency issues – the datasheet does admit that action games won’t provide a very good experience because of these delays.

The HD-10 is expected to be available in September 2014, and available from EUR 79 / USD 79.

Specifications:

  • Dimensions

    • Diameter: 80 mm
    • Thickness: 21 mm
    • Weight: 115 g
  • Connectivity

    • Other wireless connectivity: Screen projection, Wi-Fi CERTIFIED Miracast
    • Charging connectors: Micro-USB 
    • AV connectors: HDMI-A 
    • NFC: Connecting 
    • Wi-Fi: WLAN IEEE 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct
  • Usage

    • Video resolution: up to 1080p (Full HD, 1920 x 1080) 
    • LED indicators: Power on indicator 
  • Audio

    • Audio features: Up to LPCM 5.1 surround sound 

As usual, there’s a promo video (rather concentrating on what you can’t do, rather than what you can do, but….!)

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Hardware
 

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All About Windows Phone

Microsoft on leveraging Android flagship hardware to help WP take off

Published by at 9:43 UTC, September 1st 2014

There was an interesting piece published over on C|Net a few days ago, with a Microsoft executive talking about the introduction of the HTC One (M8) for Windows, leveraging the hardware investment from HTC and assisted by changes made by Microsoft for Windows Phone 8.1. Some quotes below….

From the C|Net piece:

htc-one-m8-for-windows-presser-042.jpg

The underlying notion is this: Microsoft wants to make it easier to introduce devices that use the Windows Phone software. That was the message delivered this week’s announcement of the HTC One M8 for Windows Phone.

Specifically, Microsoft has tweaked its Windows Phone 8.1 software so that hardware makers can lean on the hardware and reference designs they’re already using to build devices for Android-based phones in order to build a Windows Phone device.

“We wanted handset makers like HTC to be able to leverage their engineering investment and provide them with a real choice,” said Darren Laybourn, vice president of engineering for Microsoft in an interview following the launch of the HTC One M8 for Windows. “We feel the software should be the differentiator and not the hardware.”

…Microsoft has struggled to convince hardware partners to make phones running the Windows Phone operating system in what has turned into a chicken-and-egg scenario. Device makers don’t want to dedicate resources to building a Windows Phone because there are so few customers. But without the devices — especially iconic ones that offer cutting edge components and technology — the operating system will never gain popularity among customers.

Microsoft’s Laybourn said the company had begun tweaking the Windows Software to adapt to different hardware designs even before starting work with HTC. For instance, Windows Phone 8.1, launched in the spring, offers redesigned software keys that strip away the old hard buttons on the bottom of the device, replacing them with “soft keys” that pop up at the bottom of screen.

He said there are now 14 devices in Microsoft’s reference design program expected to wind up as real products in the next six months. Some will use Android hardware designs reconfigured slightly to work with the Windows Phone software.

…What’s more, the designs and specifications used to build Android devices are often a generation ahead of what’s used in Windows Phone devices, Rubin added. This allows a company like HTC to build a truly high-end smartphone with the latest specifications.

Interesting stuff, one wonders which other Android hardware will end up with Windows Phone. Although Samsung and LG have dabbled in the platform before, I have to think that the chances of a Windows Phone-running Galaxy S5 or G3 are somewhat remote. Not least because of Samsung’s somewhat hard wired control keys and LG’s tight focus on Android. And Huawei has already ruled itself out, apparently. More likely is that some of the lower tier Android manufacturers, each struggling to make headway against the likes of Samsung and LG, will experiment with doing the same dual-purpose hardware trick that HTC has pulled off here.

See also our launch story on the HTC One (M8) for Windows. Although there’s lots to like about the device, I have to take slight issue with the ‘ truly high-end smartphone with the latest specifications’ bit. The One (M8) is over-large, with huge bottom bezel (though the speaker takes up some of this, it’s true), plus the camera is an almighty kludge whose only saving grace is that it’s very fast.

You can read the whole C|Net article here.

Source / Credit: C|Net

Filed: > >

Platforms: General
Categories: Industry, Platform
 

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All About Windows Phone

Microsoft on leveraging Android flagship hardware to help WP take off

Published by at 9:43 UTC, September 1st 2014

There was an interesting piece published over on C|Net a few days ago, with a Microsoft executive talking about the introduction of the HTC One (M8) for Windows, leveraging the hardware investment from HTC and assisted by changes made by Microsoft for Windows Phone 8.1. Some quotes below….

From the C|Net piece:

htc-one-m8-for-windows-presser-042.jpg

The underlying notion is this: Microsoft wants to make it easier to introduce devices that use the Windows Phone software. That was the message delivered this week’s announcement of the HTC One M8 for Windows Phone.

Specifically, Microsoft has tweaked its Windows Phone 8.1 software so that hardware makers can lean on the hardware and reference designs they’re already using to build devices for Android-based phones in order to build a Windows Phone device.

“We wanted handset makers like HTC to be able to leverage their engineering investment and provide them with a real choice,” said Darren Laybourn, vice president of engineering for Microsoft in an interview following the launch of the HTC One M8 for Windows. “We feel the software should be the differentiator and not the hardware.”

…Microsoft has struggled to convince hardware partners to make phones running the Windows Phone operating system in what has turned into a chicken-and-egg scenario. Device makers don’t want to dedicate resources to building a Windows Phone because there are so few customers. But without the devices — especially iconic ones that offer cutting edge components and technology — the operating system will never gain popularity among customers.

Microsoft’s Laybourn said the company had begun tweaking the Windows Software to adapt to different hardware designs even before starting work with HTC. For instance, Windows Phone 8.1, launched in the spring, offers redesigned software keys that strip away the old hard buttons on the bottom of the device, replacing them with “soft keys” that pop up at the bottom of screen.

He said there are now 14 devices in Microsoft’s reference design program expected to wind up as real products in the next six months. Some will use Android hardware designs reconfigured slightly to work with the Windows Phone software.

…What’s more, the designs and specifications used to build Android devices are often a generation ahead of what’s used in Windows Phone devices, Rubin added. This allows a company like HTC to build a truly high-end smartphone with the latest specifications.

Interesting stuff, one wonders which other Android hardware will end up with Windows Phone. Although Samsung and LG have dabbled in the platform before, I have to think that the chances of a Windows Phone-running Galaxy S5 or G3 are somewhat remote. Not least because of Samsung’s somewhat hard wired control keys and LG’s tight focus on Android. And Huawei has already ruled itself out, apparently. More likely is that some of the lower tier Android manufacturers, each struggling to make headway against the likes of Samsung and LG, will experiment with doing the same dual-purpose hardware trick that HTC has pulled off here.

See also our launch story on the HTC One (M8) for Windows. Although there’s lots to like about the device, I have to take slight issue with the ‘ truly high-end smartphone with the latest specifications’ bit. The One (M8) is over-large, with huge bottom bezel (though the speaker takes up some of this, it’s true), plus the camera is an almighty kludge whose only saving grace is that it’s very fast.

You can read the whole C|Net article here.

Source / Credit: C|Net

Filed: > >

Platforms: General
Categories: Industry, Platform
 

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All About Windows Phone

Microsoft on leveraging Android flagship hardware to help WP take off

Published by at 9:43 UTC, September 1st 2014

There was an interesting piece published over on C|Net a few days ago, with a Microsoft executive talking about the introduction of the HTC One (M8) for Windows, leveraging the hardware investment from HTC and assisted by changes made by Microsoft for Windows Phone 8.1. Some quotes below….

From the C|Net piece:

htc-one-m8-for-windows-presser-042.jpg

The underlying notion is this: Microsoft wants to make it easier to introduce devices that use the Windows Phone software. That was the message delivered this week’s announcement of the HTC One M8 for Windows Phone.

Specifically, Microsoft has tweaked its Windows Phone 8.1 software so that hardware makers can lean on the hardware and reference designs they’re already using to build devices for Android-based phones in order to build a Windows Phone device.

“We wanted handset makers like HTC to be able to leverage their engineering investment and provide them with a real choice,” said Darren Laybourn, vice president of engineering for Microsoft in an interview following the launch of the HTC One M8 for Windows. “We feel the software should be the differentiator and not the hardware.”

…Microsoft has struggled to convince hardware partners to make phones running the Windows Phone operating system in what has turned into a chicken-and-egg scenario. Device makers don’t want to dedicate resources to building a Windows Phone because there are so few customers. But without the devices — especially iconic ones that offer cutting edge components and technology — the operating system will never gain popularity among customers.

Microsoft’s Laybourn said the company had begun tweaking the Windows Software to adapt to different hardware designs even before starting work with HTC. For instance, Windows Phone 8.1, launched in the spring, offers redesigned software keys that strip away the old hard buttons on the bottom of the device, replacing them with “soft keys” that pop up at the bottom of screen.

He said there are now 14 devices in Microsoft’s reference design program expected to wind up as real products in the next six months. Some will use Android hardware designs reconfigured slightly to work with the Windows Phone software.

…What’s more, the designs and specifications used to build Android devices are often a generation ahead of what’s used in Windows Phone devices, Rubin added. This allows a company like HTC to build a truly high-end smartphone with the latest specifications.

Interesting stuff, one wonders which other Android hardware will end up with Windows Phone. Although Samsung and LG have dabbled in the platform before, I have to think that the chances of a Windows Phone-running Galaxy S5 or G3 are somewhat remote. Not least because of Samsung’s somewhat hard wired control keys and LG’s tight focus on Android. And Huawei has already ruled itself out, apparently. More likely is that some of the lower tier Android manufacturers, each struggling to make headway against the likes of Samsung and LG, will experiment with doing the same dual-purpose hardware trick that HTC has pulled off here.

See also our launch story on the HTC One (M8) for Windows. Although there’s lots to like about the device, I have to take slight issue with the ‘ truly high-end smartphone with the latest specifications’ bit. The One (M8) is over-large, with huge bottom bezel (though the speaker takes up some of this, it’s true), plus the camera is an almighty kludge whose only saving grace is that it’s very fast.

You can read the whole C|Net article here.

Source / Credit: C|Net

Filed: > >

Platforms: General
Categories: Industry, Platform
 

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All About Windows Phone

Microsoft on leveraging Android flagship hardware to help WP take off

Published by at 9:43 UTC, September 1st 2014

There was an interesting piece published over on C|Net a few days ago, with a Microsoft executive talking about the introduction of the HTC One (M8) for Windows, leveraging the hardware investment from HTC and assisted by changes made by Microsoft for Windows Phone 8.1. Some quotes below….

From the C|Net piece:

htc-one-m8-for-windows-presser-042.jpg

The underlying notion is this: Microsoft wants to make it easier to introduce devices that use the Windows Phone software. That was the message delivered this week’s announcement of the HTC One M8 for Windows Phone.

Specifically, Microsoft has tweaked its Windows Phone 8.1 software so that hardware makers can lean on the hardware and reference designs they’re already using to build devices for Android-based phones in order to build a Windows Phone device.

“We wanted handset makers like HTC to be able to leverage their engineering investment and provide them with a real choice,” said Darren Laybourn, vice president of engineering for Microsoft in an interview following the launch of the HTC One M8 for Windows. “We feel the software should be the differentiator and not the hardware.”

…Microsoft has struggled to convince hardware partners to make phones running the Windows Phone operating system in what has turned into a chicken-and-egg scenario. Device makers don’t want to dedicate resources to building a Windows Phone because there are so few customers. But without the devices — especially iconic ones that offer cutting edge components and technology — the operating system will never gain popularity among customers.

Microsoft’s Laybourn said the company had begun tweaking the Windows Software to adapt to different hardware designs even before starting work with HTC. For instance, Windows Phone 8.1, launched in the spring, offers redesigned software keys that strip away the old hard buttons on the bottom of the device, replacing them with “soft keys” that pop up at the bottom of screen.

He said there are now 14 devices in Microsoft’s reference design program expected to wind up as real products in the next six months. Some will use Android hardware designs reconfigured slightly to work with the Windows Phone software.

…What’s more, the designs and specifications used to build Android devices are often a generation ahead of what’s used in Windows Phone devices, Rubin added. This allows a company like HTC to build a truly high-end smartphone with the latest specifications.

Interesting stuff, one wonders which other Android hardware will end up with Windows Phone. Although Samsung and LG have dabbled in the platform before, I have to think that the chances of a Windows Phone-running Galaxy S5 or G3 are somewhat remote. Not least because of Samsung’s somewhat hard wired control keys and LG’s tight focus on Android. And Huawei has already ruled itself out, apparently. More likely is that some of the lower tier Android manufacturers, each struggling to make headway against the likes of Samsung and LG, will experiment with doing the same dual-purpose hardware trick that HTC has pulled off here.

See also our launch story on the HTC One (M8) for Windows. Although there’s lots to like about the device, I have to take slight issue with the ‘ truly high-end smartphone with the latest specifications’ bit. The One (M8) is over-large, with huge bottom bezel (though the speaker takes up some of this, it’s true), plus the camera is an almighty kludge whose only saving grace is that it’s very fast.

You can read the whole C|Net article here.

Source / Credit: C|Net

Filed: > >

Platforms: General
Categories: Industry, Platform
 

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All About Windows Phone

Microsoft could well release Skype for BlackBerry Playbook

Stranger things have happened in the mobile marketplace

once upon a time there was a skype client for bb7

Here at GoMo Towers we’ve been mulling over the various unholy [unlikely] alliances that have sprung up in the mobile space of late. One of these is the link between BlackBerry and Microsoft. Formerly arch rivals, BlackBerry finally did Microsoft a favour this month [August 2014] by releasing a client for its instant messaging [IM] service – BBM, which works under Windows Phone 8 [WP8]. That event was some six months after GoMo News had predicted it would happen here. Now Skype (which is owned by Microsoft) already offers a software client which will run on BB10 devices. But GoMo News feels that it might also produce a version for legacy BlackBerry devices which would, of course, include BlackBerry’s original tablet – the PlayBook.

The fact that an IT giant like Apple can over come its insular nature and entertain the thought of 100 apps created by Big Blue (IBM) on its hardware shows that the world has changed radically.

If you are going to out-flank your rivals, you need to do so by forming pacts with your competitors’ enemies.

Now here’s the problem. It’s become increasingly obvious that major growth in the mobile/cellular sector will come from the Indian & Asia Pacific regions.

And in certain specific markets – the classic one being Indonesia, BlackBerry has a huge following.

So if you are an ally of BlackBerry – which Microsoft is,  you’d want to promote your services in those regions with a little help from your friends.

So you want to push OneDrive as your mobile cloud solution and the other service you’d want to promote would be Skype (which Microsoft happens to own).

But it’s no good promoting a service to emerging markets that only works on the very latest hardware – such as Windows Phone 8 and BB10.

Hence, you need to introduce client software for older devices such as BlackBerry’s Playbook – which basically bombed from its lack of Skype support as far as GoMo News is concerned.

Now it can’t be very difficult for Microsoft to introduce a legacy version of Skype for BB7 devices.

As we pointed out here, Telkomcel was able to offer its customers (Verizon in the USA being the only other exception) a version of Skype that ran on legacy BlackBerry devices.

We think it is now only a matter of time before the likes of Microsoft and BlackBerry fully appreciate that the focus on mobile hardware is outmoded.

What you’ve got to focus on its software services. And such software services are no use at all in the emerging markets if the majority of the population can’t afford the latest device to run your software client.

Tony is currently Editor of GoMobile News. He’s a veteran telecoms journalist who has previously worked for major printed and online titles. Follow him on Twitter @GoMoTweet.


GoMo News

Microsoft could well release Skype for BlackBerry Playbook

Stranger things have happened in the mobile marketplace

once upon a time there was a skype client for bb7

Here at GoMo Towers we’ve been mulling over the various unholy [unlikely] alliances that have sprung up in the mobile space of late. One of these is the link between BlackBerry and Microsoft. Formerly arch rivals, BlackBerry finally did Microsoft a favour this month [August 2014] by releasing a client for its instant messaging [IM] service – BBM, which works under Windows Phone 8 [WP8]. That event was some six months after GoMo News had predicted it would happen here. Now Skype (which is owned by Microsoft) already offers a software client which will run on BB10 devices. But GoMo News feels that it might also produce a version for legacy BlackBerry devices which would, of course, include BlackBerry’s original tablet – the PlayBook.

The fact that an IT giant like Apple can over come its insular nature and entertain the thought of 100 apps created by Big Blue (IBM) on its hardware shows that the world has changed radically.

If you are going to out-flank your rivals, you need to do so by forming pacts with your competitors’ enemies.

Now here’s the problem. It’s become increasingly obvious that major growth in the mobile/cellular sector will come from the Indian & Asia Pacific regions.

And in certain specific markets – the classic one being Indonesia, BlackBerry has a huge following.

So if you are an ally of BlackBerry – which Microsoft is,  you’d want to promote your services in those regions with a little help from your friends.

So you want to push OneDrive as your mobile cloud solution and the other service you’d want to promote would be Skype (which Microsoft happens to own).

But it’s no good promoting a service to emerging markets that only works on the very latest hardware – such as Windows Phone 8 and BB10.

Hence, you need to introduce client software for older devices such as BlackBerry’s Playbook – which basically bombed from its lack of Skype support as far as GoMo News is concerned.

Now it can’t be very difficult for Microsoft to introduce a legacy version of Skype for BB7 devices.

As we pointed out here, Telkomcel was able to offer its customers (Verizon in the USA being the only other exception) a version of Skype that ran on legacy BlackBerry devices.

We think it is now only a matter of time before the likes of Microsoft and BlackBerry fully appreciate that the focus on mobile hardware is outmoded.

What you’ve got to focus on its software services. And such software services are no use at all in the emerging markets if the majority of the population can’t afford the latest device to run your software client.

Tony is currently Editor of GoMobile News. He’s a veteran telecoms journalist who has previously worked for major printed and online titles. Follow him on Twitter @GoMoTweet.


GoMo News