Tag Archives: Personal

Delvv Launches Personal News Feed App on Android

Delvv has today announced the launch of its free Android app, which aims to be a user’s “personal news feed,” offering them a look at the information they actually care about, which may otherwise be hidden among hundreds of Tweets, Facebook posts, local event listings, news sites and other sources.

When starting Delvv, users can subscribe to a list of overall keywords, based on the topics they find most interesting. The list contains topics like religion, politics, technology, gaming, books, dining and more. As users engage with Delvv, the app will suggest new topics for them, based on the topics they’ve been searching for, and the sites they’ve been browsing. Trending topics are also available.

1 - home screen

As users view suggested news articles, the bottoms of the these pages populate with related stories, allowing users to really “delve” into a topic of interest. Since the app starts with a general list of news topics, and becomes more personalized over time, users can help the app along by flagging posts as “Don’t quite like it” to remove them from their feed, or “Show me more like this” to express their interest.

Outside of app-aggregated news feeds, Delvv users can also browse content by searching for it directly. Searching for a phrase or topic brings up a variety of web articles, Android apps that redirect users to the Google Play store for download, and event listings that match that topic.

When browsing these web searches, users can favorite content to view it later within Delvv, or share articles to a variety of sources, including email, Twitter or Facebook, among others. Favorited articles can be organized even further, by placing them within collections within the app.

“Delvv is bringing the power of predictive search and personalization to the content discovery process, and focusing on what our users actually enjoy rather than what other people want to share with them,” said Raefer Gabriel, CEO of Delvv. “The Delvv app uses InterestScore, our advanced machine learning and personalization algorithm, to truly understand what a user likes, so we can make sure we present only the most interesting recommendations.”

Delvv is available to download for free on Google Play, and is coming soon to iOS. The app joins similar apps on iOS and Android, including Material and Vu.


Inside Mobile Apps

Delvv Launches Personal News Feed App on Android

Delvv has today announced the launch of its free Android app, which aims to be a user’s “personal news feed,” offering them a look at the information they actually care about, which may otherwise be hidden among hundreds of Tweets, Facebook posts, local event listings, news sites and other sources.

When starting Delvv, users can subscribe to a list of overall keywords, based on the topics they find most interesting. The list contains topics like religion, politics, technology, gaming, books, dining and more. As users engage with Delvv, the app will suggest new topics for them, based on the topics they’ve been searching for, and the sites they’ve been browsing. Trending topics are also available.

1 - home screen

As users view suggested news articles, the bottoms of the these pages populate with related stories, allowing users to really “delve” into a topic of interest. Since the app starts with a general list of news topics, and becomes more personalized over time, users can help the app along by flagging posts as “Don’t quite like it” to remove them from their feed, or “Show me more like this” to express their interest.

Outside of app-aggregated news feeds, Delvv users can also browse content by searching for it directly. Searching for a phrase or topic brings up a variety of web articles, Android apps that redirect users to the Google Play store for download, and event listings that match that topic.

When browsing these web searches, users can favorite content to view it later within Delvv, or share articles to a variety of sources, including email, Twitter or Facebook, among others. Favorited articles can be organized even further, by placing them within collections within the app.

“Delvv is bringing the power of predictive search and personalization to the content discovery process, and focusing on what our users actually enjoy rather than what other people want to share with them,” said Raefer Gabriel, CEO of Delvv. “The Delvv app uses InterestScore, our advanced machine learning and personalization algorithm, to truly understand what a user likes, so we can make sure we present only the most interesting recommendations.”

Delvv is available to download for free on Google Play, and is coming soon to iOS. The app joins similar apps on iOS and Android, including Material and Vu.


Inside Mobile Apps

Personal cloud app Younity preps for iTunes streaming update

younity 650

Personal cloud app Younity is preparing for a large update, which will allow users to stream their premium iTunes content to their devices without syncing or downloading the content ahead of time. In this fast-paced, always-five-minutes-behind world, it’s hard to remember to stock your iPhone or iPad with movies before a flight or long trip, or even sync your library between devices.

Now, Younity users will be able to instantly access all of their premium iTunes content, like full-length feature movies, even if they forget and are nowhere near their home PC.

“Our users love the ability to unify and stream media from all their computers, but they’ve been asking us to solve the problem of watching purchased iTunes videos for a while now,” says Erik Caso, Co-Founder and CEO of Younity. “It’s always nice to deliver on a promise that we’ll keep working to unify the huge content libraries we all have in our households.”

In addition to this iTunes update, which will officially hit tomorrow (July 1), Younity already allows users to access all of their media and files on the go, from iTunes playlists to photos, with support for typically “unusable” file formats like WMA or OGG. Users are encouraged to add as many computers, laptops or external hard drives as they’d like to this personal cloud, as users can access and search all files regardless of device.

Younity’s personal cloud solution promises privacy, as files aren’t stored online and no one but the user (or someone the user authorizes) can access them.

This is just the first of many eventual updates for Younity, as the company promises to further address user concerns for “better video discovery, access and sharing” going forward.

Younity is available to download for free on iOS.


Inside Mobile Apps

Personal cloud app Younity preps for iTunes streaming update

younity 650

Personal cloud app Younity is preparing for a large update, which will allow users to stream their premium iTunes content to their devices without syncing or downloading the content ahead of time. In this fast-paced, always-five-minutes-behind world, it’s hard to remember to stock your iPhone or iPad with movies before a flight or long trip, or even sync your library between devices.

Now, Younity users will be able to instantly access all of their premium iTunes content, like full-length feature movies, even if they forget and are nowhere near their home PC.

“Our users love the ability to unify and stream media from all their computers, but they’ve been asking us to solve the problem of watching purchased iTunes videos for a while now,” says Erik Caso, Co-Founder and CEO of Younity. “It’s always nice to deliver on a promise that we’ll keep working to unify the huge content libraries we all have in our households.”

In addition to this iTunes update, which will officially hit tomorrow (July 1), Younity already allows users to access all of their media and files on the go, from iTunes playlists to photos, with support for typically “unusable” file formats like WMA or OGG. Users are encouraged to add as many computers, laptops or external hard drives as they’d like to this personal cloud, as users can access and search all files regardless of device.

Younity’s personal cloud solution promises privacy, as files aren’t stored online and no one but the user (or someone the user authorizes) can access them.

This is just the first of many eventual updates for Younity, as the company promises to further address user concerns for “better video discovery, access and sharing” going forward.

Younity is available to download for free on iOS.


Inside Mobile Apps

New research identifies increasing trust tension among European consumers in how organisations use their personal data

New study by Orange – Future of Digital Trust – shows lack of trust is undermining opportunities for more personalised and useful services

78% of consumers think it is hard to trust companies when it comes to use of their data, and 70% think there are few or no trusted ways to find out about personal data use

Better transparency, consumer control, and education required in order to address imbalance

Press release

Orange  has released the findings of new research into consumer concerns about how companies use their personal data – research which clearly demonstrates that all businesses need to work together to rebuild consumer trust.

This first instalment of an independent, three-part study with consumers across France, Poland, Spain and the UK highlights that consumers are increasingly wary about how their information is being used; do not feel in control; and do not believe there are any resources to help educate them on how to manage their data online.

Indeed, over three-quarters (78 per cent) state that it is hard to trust companies when it comes to the way they use consumer personal data.

An identical figure (78 per cent) feel that service providers hold too much information about consumer behaviour and preferences.

Meanwhile, 82 per cent feel they have little power to control the way their personal data is used by organisations.

While there are exciting opportunities for both consumers and service providers that can be built on intelligent, consensual and responsible use of consumer data – trustworthy data use is increasingly a fundamental requirement, and is having a greater impact on companies’ overall reputations.

In fact, 29 per cent of consumers trust companies less over the past year in general, while 16 per cent report more and 55 per cent have neither more nor less trust, clearly illustrating that trust is in decline.

“Faced with the rapid development of uses of consumer data, more needs to be done to help consumers understand and manage how their personal data is used,” said Daniel Gurrola, vp for business vision with Orange.

“In 2013, Orange made a commitment to our customers and the European Commission to increase transparency and control. 1

“We have started on this journey with increased transparency and new services such as Orange’s personal data dashboard, but this research shows that we, as an industry, have much more to do.”

The trust gap is increasing

The independent research points clearly to an increasing trust tension towards organisations holding consumer data, as well as a lack of trust in the responsible use of that data.

Of most concern, is the fact that trust is waning, with multiple sectors seeing a decline in the last year.

Which organisations do you trust less / more than a year ago?

Financial institutions: 31 per cent of respondents trust less than a year ago (21 per cent trust more)

Device manufacturers: 19 per cent less / (18 per cent more)

Mobile operators: 26% less / (16% more)

Internet service providers: 26% less / (16% more)

App developers: 26% less / (13% more)

 Social networks: 46% less / (12% more)

The research shows that the treatment of personal data is a primary driver of consumer trust in organisations, and is almost as important as the quality of the core services that an organisation delivers. 

Trust in organisations to use personal data online also varies by vertical sector, with financial institutions being most, and social networks being least trusted:

Who do you trust to use/protect personal data?

Financial institutions: 51%

Mobile operators: 41%

Device manufacturers: 41%

Internet service providers: 41%

App developers: 24%

Social networks: 20%

Imbalance of benefits

Alongside the issues around trust are concerns about who benefits most from the data that consumers share with organisations:

Just 6% of respondents feel that the consumer is the main beneficiary of organisations gathering information about customer purchasing behaviour or history

67% say that the organisations themselves benefit most

Just 16% see the benefits as being equally shared

The research also demonstrates that consumers today do not think they are well informed about how their data is used or how to manage it, and there is currently no clear consumer champion to educate them.

Consumer bodies are doing the best job, but the relatively low figures suggest there is a need for improvement across the board:

Who educates consumers about managing personal data?

Consumer bodies: 36%

Mobile operators: 20%

Internet service providers: 20%

National government organisations: 12%

Don’t know / None: 37%

However, it is perhaps most telling that 37% cannot think of any organisations that are doing a good job of educating the consumer about managing their personal data.

Tackling the problem is a collective responsibility

Consumers are clearly saying that work needs to be done by all businesses in order to address the issue of trust and ensure that the opportunities created by use of data – for both the consumer and companies involved – are not lost.

Importantly, the research indicates all businesses have a role to play, and only through working together will consumer trust be increased.

Orange is making a call to action around three key areas which need addressing by all businesses: –

Transparency – the industry needs to be more answerable and transparent about data usage and data sharing

Control – the industry needs to provide tools to allow consumers to control their data, dialling up, or dialling down as they wish, and receiving the services and benefits accordingly. Data sharing must be an informed decision from the consumer

Education – there is currently no stand-out body who is seen to be educating the consumer about how to control their data. The industry must therefore act as a collective consumer champion and show the way forward

Fundamentally, consumers want the balance redressed in order to gain greater control of their personal data and benefit more from sharing their data.

This can be achieved by providing consumers with transparent data policies and offering tools to help them control use of their data.

The executive summary and an overview of the results can be downloaded at www.orange.com/digitaltrust<

about the Orange Data Privacy Charter

Orange aims to be recognised by its customers, users and partners as their “trusted operator”. To that end the Group has made clear and solid commitments to protecting personal data and respecting our customers’ privacy. On 7th November, at the Hello 2013 Show, Stéphane Richard officially signed a charter comprising 4 commitments to protecting our customers’ personal data and privacy : –

security of customers’ personal data through its reliable processing and secure storage

control for customers over their own personal data and how it is used, including a personal dashboard

 transparency in terms of the handling of data for its customers and users at all stages throughout our relationship

support for all its customers and users to help them protect their privacy and manage their personal data better

To learn more about the Orange Personal Data Charter, click here>.

about the Future of Digital Trust research

Loudhouse conducted 2,023 online interviews among adults 13+ who have a mobile phone in the France, Poland, Spain and the UK. Fieldwork was conducted in December 2013 and January 2014.

about Orange

Orange is one of the world’s leading telecommunications operators with sales of 43.5 billion euros in 2012 and had 166,000 employees worldwide at 30 September 2013, including 102,000 employees in France. Present in 32 countries, the Group had a total customer base of more than 232 million customers at 30 September 2013, including 175 million mobile customers and 15 million fixed broadband customers worldwide. Orange is also a leading provider of global IT and telecommunication services to multinational companies, under the brand Orange Business Services.
Orange is listed on the NYSE Euronext Paris (symbol ORA) and on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol ORAN).
For more information: http://www.orange.com>, www.orange-business.com<


GoMo News

New research identifies increasing trust tension among European consumers in how organisations use their personal data

New study by Orange – Future of Digital Trust – shows lack of trust is undermining opportunities for more personalised and useful services

78% of consumers think it is hard to trust companies when it comes to use of their data, and 70% think there are few or no trusted ways to find out about personal data use

Better transparency, consumer control, and education required in order to address imbalance

Press release

Orange  has released the findings of new research into consumer concerns about how companies use their personal data – research which clearly demonstrates that all businesses need to work together to rebuild consumer trust.

This first instalment of an independent, three-part study with consumers across France, Poland, Spain and the UK highlights that consumers are increasingly wary about how their information is being used; do not feel in control; and do not believe there are any resources to help educate them on how to manage their data online.

Indeed, over three-quarters (78 per cent) state that it is hard to trust companies when it comes to the way they use consumer personal data.

An identical figure (78 per cent) feel that service providers hold too much information about consumer behaviour and preferences.

Meanwhile, 82 per cent feel they have little power to control the way their personal data is used by organisations.

While there are exciting opportunities for both consumers and service providers that can be built on intelligent, consensual and responsible use of consumer data – trustworthy data use is increasingly a fundamental requirement, and is having a greater impact on companies’ overall reputations.

In fact, 29 per cent of consumers trust companies less over the past year in general, while 16 per cent report more and 55 per cent have neither more nor less trust, clearly illustrating that trust is in decline.

“Faced with the rapid development of uses of consumer data, more needs to be done to help consumers understand and manage how their personal data is used,” said Daniel Gurrola, vp for business vision with Orange.

“In 2013, Orange made a commitment to our customers and the European Commission to increase transparency and control. 1

“We have started on this journey with increased transparency and new services such as Orange’s personal data dashboard, but this research shows that we, as an industry, have much more to do.”

The trust gap is increasing

The independent research points clearly to an increasing trust tension towards organisations holding consumer data, as well as a lack of trust in the responsible use of that data.

Of most concern, is the fact that trust is waning, with multiple sectors seeing a decline in the last year.

Which organisations do you trust less / more than a year ago?

Financial institutions: 31 per cent of respondents trust less than a year ago (21 per cent trust more)

Device manufacturers: 19 per cent less / (18 per cent more)

Mobile operators: 26% less / (16% more)

Internet service providers: 26% less / (16% more)

App developers: 26% less / (13% more)

 Social networks: 46% less / (12% more)

The research shows that the treatment of personal data is a primary driver of consumer trust in organisations, and is almost as important as the quality of the core services that an organisation delivers. 

Trust in organisations to use personal data online also varies by vertical sector, with financial institutions being most, and social networks being least trusted:

Who do you trust to use/protect personal data?

Financial institutions: 51%

Mobile operators: 41%

Device manufacturers: 41%

Internet service providers: 41%

App developers: 24%

Social networks: 20%

Imbalance of benefits

Alongside the issues around trust are concerns about who benefits most from the data that consumers share with organisations:

Just 6% of respondents feel that the consumer is the main beneficiary of organisations gathering information about customer purchasing behaviour or history

67% say that the organisations themselves benefit most

Just 16% see the benefits as being equally shared

The research also demonstrates that consumers today do not think they are well informed about how their data is used or how to manage it, and there is currently no clear consumer champion to educate them.

Consumer bodies are doing the best job, but the relatively low figures suggest there is a need for improvement across the board:

Who educates consumers about managing personal data?

Consumer bodies: 36%

Mobile operators: 20%

Internet service providers: 20%

National government organisations: 12%

Don’t know / None: 37%

However, it is perhaps most telling that 37% cannot think of any organisations that are doing a good job of educating the consumer about managing their personal data.

Tackling the problem is a collective responsibility

Consumers are clearly saying that work needs to be done by all businesses in order to address the issue of trust and ensure that the opportunities created by use of data – for both the consumer and companies involved – are not lost.

Importantly, the research indicates all businesses have a role to play, and only through working together will consumer trust be increased.

Orange is making a call to action around three key areas which need addressing by all businesses: –

Transparency – the industry needs to be more answerable and transparent about data usage and data sharing

Control – the industry needs to provide tools to allow consumers to control their data, dialling up, or dialling down as they wish, and receiving the services and benefits accordingly. Data sharing must be an informed decision from the consumer

Education – there is currently no stand-out body who is seen to be educating the consumer about how to control their data. The industry must therefore act as a collective consumer champion and show the way forward

Fundamentally, consumers want the balance redressed in order to gain greater control of their personal data and benefit more from sharing their data.

This can be achieved by providing consumers with transparent data policies and offering tools to help them control use of their data.

The executive summary and an overview of the results can be downloaded at www.orange.com/digitaltrust<

about the Orange Data Privacy Charter

Orange aims to be recognised by its customers, users and partners as their “trusted operator”. To that end the Group has made clear and solid commitments to protecting personal data and respecting our customers’ privacy. On 7th November, at the Hello 2013 Show, Stéphane Richard officially signed a charter comprising 4 commitments to protecting our customers’ personal data and privacy : –

security of customers’ personal data through its reliable processing and secure storage

control for customers over their own personal data and how it is used, including a personal dashboard

 transparency in terms of the handling of data for its customers and users at all stages throughout our relationship

support for all its customers and users to help them protect their privacy and manage their personal data better

To learn more about the Orange Personal Data Charter, click here>.

about the Future of Digital Trust research

Loudhouse conducted 2,023 online interviews among adults 13+ who have a mobile phone in the France, Poland, Spain and the UK. Fieldwork was conducted in December 2013 and January 2014.

about Orange

Orange is one of the world’s leading telecommunications operators with sales of 43.5 billion euros in 2012 and had 166,000 employees worldwide at 30 September 2013, including 102,000 employees in France. Present in 32 countries, the Group had a total customer base of more than 232 million customers at 30 September 2013, including 175 million mobile customers and 15 million fixed broadband customers worldwide. Orange is also a leading provider of global IT and telecommunication services to multinational companies, under the brand Orange Business Services.
Orange is listed on the NYSE Euronext Paris (symbol ORA) and on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol ORAN).
For more information: http://www.orange.com>, www.orange-business.com<


GoMo News

Preparing to move personal data when the BlackBerry Z3 is available

Hardware clinic: PC-less upgrade via Device Switch is possible

switch to BB10 indonesian style

When BlackBerry announced that the Z3 would be the first handset made for the Canadian company in China by Foxconn, it was also extremely obvious that the smartphone was designed with BlackBerry’s enthusiastic followers in the Indonesian market in mind. There have also been strong hints that the Z3 will be definitely competitively priced to appeal to the widest audience possible. Which all means that there will be large numbers of Indonesian BlackBerry fanbois who will be upgrading their handsets.

That’s lucky because GoMo News has just migrated from a Curve 9320 to a BB10 based Q5 and so we can offer some assistance in the upgrade process.

Here at GoMo News, however, we’re completely surprised that the Z3 is an all-touch model whereas as we regard BlackBerry’s USP [Unique Selling Point] as the fact that it sports a very useable keypad.

Nonetheless, there is a standard BlackBerry facility which all our Indonesian readers can check out in advance called ‘Device Switch’.

The beauty of this personal data migration utility is that it can be completely ‘PC-less’.

There’s no need to have access to a desktop at all. All you need is to inset a memory card into your BlackBerry handset – if there isn’t one there already.

So it’s worth checking if you already have a (microSD) memory card sitting inside the BlackBerry and if so, whether you think you have sufficient memory on that card.

One of the easiest ways to find the Device Switch facility is to search for it using the BlackBerry built-in search facility.

Alternatively, you should be able to find it from the Setup menu. BlackBerry claims you can even download this app if it’s missing from your handset.

Follow the menu options with Device Switch and you can save all of your personal data with the ‘Using a Media Card’ facility.

Once that is done, it’s a simple matter of inserting the media card into you new (Z3) handset.

Once again the Device Switch option is accessible from the Setup menu.

The only thing which GoMo News found bizarre is that the whole process doesn’t import your email settings to the new handset.

So, although you can transfer saved emails from the old handset to the new, before you can do so you need to set up the requisite email account.

We reckon that a whole bunch of our Asian readers will soon be utilising this neat BlackBerry facility.

Tony is currently Editor of GoMobile News. He’s a veteran telecoms journalist who has previously worked for major printed and online titles. Follow him on Twitter @GoMoTweet.


GoMo News

Personal data found on UK second-hand handsets by Channel 4

What you want is data sanitisation says Teleplan

Over here in Blighty [UK], it is pretty common practice to take old handsets down to High Street shops and cash them in. However, yesterday [February 6th 2014] a Channel 4 News ‘Data Baby’ report here found that handsets were being dold without all the personal data being wiped clean. It alleges that tow of the High Street’s best names – Cash Converters and CEX have been selling second-hand mobile devices without fully removing the data of the previous owner. This has led to calls from Teleplan for complete data sanitisation to be implemented by second-hand handset resellers.

One major concern, of course, is that with the increasingly widespread adoption of BYOD [Bring Your Own Device], some of this data might belong to businesses and organisations.

Obviously, there is a need for consumer education so consumers are encouraged to remove their personal data in the first place.

However, according to Sven Boddington, vp for global marketing & client solutions with Teleplan there is a responsibility on these companies to permanently remove data to the highest standards.

“To say its worrying to find two of the largest pawn shop chains are selling mobile phones with data still on them is an understatement,” Boddington argued.

“As consumers, we are becoming increasingly reliant on our mobile devices, from basic communications, social media, to mobile banking and payment transactions, and therefore the data they carry is more and more sensitive.”

He continued, “Businesses that process mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets for use as second hand products have a responsibility to the sellers, and buyers of these devices to ensure that the proper security procedures are applied so that personal data is thoroughly and permanently destroyed.”

“It’s not good enough to delete the personal data to only a “basic standard” or worse still, not at all as there is an obligation to comply with data protection laws.”

“One way of doing this, is to meet recognised industry standards such as the Device Renewal Forum Certification Compliance criteria for Data Sanitization for mobile devices, ” Boddington commented.

Hans Cett is an established freelance author and consultant specialising in the mobile communications industry. He also writes for Countdown2MWC – http://countdown2mwc.wordpress.com/

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GoMo News