Tag Archives: Point

Store app updates point to zero-point Insider rings

week ago, we reported on the intention by Microsoft to stop compiling new Insiders ring development builds for Windows 10 Mobile. Effectively, from now on we just have the monthly security and bug fix updates for the OS. However, UWP application updates, not least for all Microsoft’s own applications will continue apace. And talking of app updates, the last few days have also shown another important trend moving away from Insiders builds – they’ve been used in the past to trial new versions of the likes of Skype, Outlook and Office apps, but it seems like these will now be pushed to production status handsets instead. And, curiously, only production.

Admittedly I’m conjecturing here, but I have a pretty major data point – the Microsoft Store application itself. The version number on my ‘Fast’ ring status handsets (shown below, left, on my Lumia 950 XL) is five builds (and two real world updates) older than the Store version on my (now) production status IDOL 4 Pro (below, right):

ScreenshotScreenshot

(The intermediate build was .13.0, in case you were wondering) Now, it’s true that there are no visible changes between the two minor versions, but there will have been bug fixes and it’s the cutting edge of the new trend, I think. 

My advice a week ago was to ‘Stop Insider builds’ on phones which had previously been left on the ‘Fast’ ring, if ony to hoover up new application updates, but it seems that this may not still be the best option. Leaving the Insiders programme on each phone may well result in newer applications and, hopefully, new features and less bugs. 

When you opt to ‘Stop Insider Builds’ (in Settings), the option to go for is ‘Keep giving me builds until the next Windows release’. This puts you back on track to pick up the monthly Windows 10 Mobile branch releases when they exceed the build number of whatever your device is currently on. And, yes, it lets the Store application know that your phone is now ‘production’ again, letting it pick up – ironically, in this case – a new version of itself!

Interesting times, though the pace of application development (if not the core mobile OS) is still impressive and not a day goes by without multiple app updates to core Microsoft phone properties.

Comments welcome – have you spotted any more major applications with newer versions on ‘production’ status phones than ‘Insiders’ devices?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

All About Windows Phone

Store app updates point to zero-point Insider rings

week ago, we reported on the intention by Microsoft to stop compiling new Insiders ring development builds for Windows 10 Mobile. Effectively, from now on we just have the monthly security and bug fix updates for the OS. However, UWP application updates, not least for all Microsoft’s own applications will continue apace. And talking of app updates, the last few days have also shown another important trend moving away from Insiders builds – they’ve been used in the past to trial new versions of the likes of Skype, Outlook and Office apps, but it seems like these will now be pushed to production status handsets instead. And, curiously, only production.

Admittedly I’m conjecturing here, but I have a pretty major data point – the Microsoft Store application itself. The version number on my ‘Fast’ ring status handsets (shown below, left, on my Lumia 950 XL) is five builds (and two real world updates) older than the Store version on my (now) production status IDOL 4 Pro (below, right):

ScreenshotScreenshot

(The intermediate build was .13.0, in case you were wondering) Now, it’s true that there are no visible changes between the two minor versions, but there will have been bug fixes and it’s the cutting edge of the new trend, I think. 

My advice a week ago was to ‘Stop Insider builds’ on phones which had previously been left on the ‘Fast’ ring, if ony to hoover up new application updates, but it seems that this may not still be the best option. Leaving the Insiders programme on each phone may well result in newer applications and, hopefully, new features and less bugs. 

When you opt to ‘Stop Insider Builds’ (in Settings), the option to go for is ‘Keep giving me builds until the next Windows release’. This puts you back on track to pick up the monthly Windows 10 Mobile branch releases when they exceed the build number of whatever your device is currently on. And, yes, it lets the Store application know that your phone is now ‘production’ again, letting it pick up – ironically, in this case – a new version of itself!

Interesting times, though the pace of application development (if not the core mobile OS) is still impressive and not a day goes by without multiple app updates to core Microsoft phone properties.

Comments welcome – have you spotted any more major applications with newer versions on ‘production’ status phones than ‘Insiders’ devices?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

All About Windows Phone

Store app updates point to zero-point Insider rings

week ago, we reported on the intention by Microsoft to stop compiling new Insiders ring development builds for Windows 10 Mobile. Effectively, from now on we just have the monthly security and bug fix updates for the OS. However, UWP application updates, not least for all Microsoft’s own applications will continue apace. And talking of app updates, the last few days have also shown another important trend moving away from Insiders builds – they’ve been used in the past to trial new versions of the likes of Skype, Outlook and Office apps, but it seems like these will now be pushed to production status handsets instead. And, curiously, only production.

Admittedly I’m conjecturing here, but I have a pretty major data point – the Microsoft Store application itself. The version number on my ‘Fast’ ring status handsets (shown below, left, on my Lumia 950 XL) is five builds (and two real world updates) older than the Store version on my (now) production status IDOL 4 Pro (below, right):

ScreenshotScreenshot

(The intermediate build was .13.0, in case you were wondering) Now, it’s true that there are no visible changes between the two minor versions, but there will have been bug fixes and it’s the cutting edge of the new trend, I think. 

My advice a week ago was to ‘Stop Insider builds’ on phones which had previously been left on the ‘Fast’ ring, if ony to hoover up new application updates, but it seems that this may not still be the best option. Leaving the Insiders programme on each phone may well result in newer applications and, hopefully, new features and less bugs. 

When you opt to ‘Stop Insider Builds’ (in Settings), the option to go for is ‘Keep giving me builds until the next Windows release’. This puts you back on track to pick up the monthly Windows 10 Mobile branch releases when they exceed the build number of whatever your device is currently on. And, yes, it lets the Store application know that your phone is now ‘production’ again, letting it pick up – ironically, in this case – a new version of itself!

Interesting times, though the pace of application development (if not the core mobile OS) is still impressive and not a day goes by without multiple app updates to core Microsoft phone properties.

Comments welcome – have you spotted any more major applications with newer versions on ‘production’ status phones than ‘Insiders’ devices?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

All About Windows Phone

Store app updates point to zero-point Insider rings

week ago, we reported on the intention by Microsoft to stop compiling new Insiders ring development builds for Windows 10 Mobile. Effectively, from now on we just have the monthly security and bug fix updates for the OS. However, UWP application updates, not least for all Microsoft’s own applications will continue apace. And talking of app updates, the last few days have also shown another important trend moving away from Insiders builds – they’ve been used in the past to trial new versions of the likes of Skype, Outlook and Office apps, but it seems like these will now be pushed to production status handsets instead. And, curiously, only production.

Admittedly I’m conjecturing here, but I have a pretty major data point – the Microsoft Store application itself. The version number on my ‘Fast’ ring status handsets (shown below, left, on my Lumia 950 XL) is five builds (and two real world updates) older than the Store version on my (now) production status IDOL 4 Pro (below, right):

ScreenshotScreenshot

(The intermediate build was .13.0, in case you were wondering) Now, it’s true that there are no visible changes between the two minor versions, but there will have been bug fixes and it’s the cutting edge of the new trend, I think. 

My advice a week ago was to ‘Stop Insider builds’ on phones which had previously been left on the ‘Fast’ ring, if ony to hoover up new application updates, but it seems that this may not still be the best option. Leaving the Insiders programme on each phone may well result in newer applications and, hopefully, new features and less bugs. 

When you opt to ‘Stop Insider Builds’ (in Settings), the option to go for is ‘Keep giving me builds until the next Windows release’. This puts you back on track to pick up the monthly Windows 10 Mobile branch releases when they exceed the build number of whatever your device is currently on. And, yes, it lets the Store application know that your phone is now ‘production’ again, letting it pick up – ironically, in this case – a new version of itself!

Interesting times, though the pace of application development (if not the core mobile OS) is still impressive and not a day goes by without multiple app updates to core Microsoft phone properties.

Comments welcome – have you spotted any more major applications with newer versions on ‘production’ status phones than ‘Insiders’ devices?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

All About Windows Phone

Motorola codenames offer X+1 evidence, point to other new devices

Earlier this afternoon, we checked in with some of the most recent Windows Phone rumors as we looked at a report mentioning development codenames for a number of Nokia handsets, extending all the way into late 2015. Now we’re crossing the tracks over to the Android side of town, as we learn about some Motorola codenames popping up in the company’s own software.

Motorola’s Bug2Go app contains a laundry list of devices, identified by codenames. Like the Vanquish you see in these screenshots below? That’s the phone that ended up launching as the RAZR HD. But some of these codenames don’t line up with known hardware, possibly giving us some insight into what’s to come.

The highest-profile name is arguably the Xplus1, which we’re assuming is styled as such (rather than X+1) due to formatting limitations. Beyond the four US carrier variants, we also see plans to make the phone available in markets around the world.

Either xWatch or xClock might be the Moto 360, but it’s odd that we see two such names here. Could one be the 360, and another an upcoming smartwatch? Maybe a square-faced model?

Titan is a name that popped up occasionally last year, but was never identified as a commercially released product. Based on the number of variants here, it sure looks like something for which Motorola has big plans, so we’re holding out hope that it still might see the light of day.

Quantum is another name from last year, when it was discussed alongside rumors of a 6.3-inch XPlay phablet. We had the impression that they were two separate devices, but that’s no longer clear, and Quantum may end up being a phablet itself.

Lastly, there’s the Uline, a name that’s all new to us. The VoLTE support mentioned here is pretty interesting, and we wonder if the presence of a single Verizon carrier version might mean that this could be a new Droid-series handset.

moto-codes-1 moto-codes-2

Source: hellomotoHK (Google+)
Via: Droid-life


Pocketnow

Does the Surface Pro 3 point to a new marketing message for Windows Phone?

Published by at 8:09 UTC, May 28th 2014

Last week’s reveal of the Surface Pro 3 by Microsoft continued the evolution of Redmond under CEO Satya Nadella towards a company with a focus on a cloud-powered mobile computing platform. It also surrendered the consumer tablet space to iOS and Android as the Surface was subtly pitched towards the Enterprise market. Is this a sign of Windows Phone’s future strategy?

If you follow the rumour mill, there were a lot of indications that Microsoft would launch a 7-inch ‘Surface Mini’ at last week’s New York event alongside the 12-inch Surface Pro 3. Nobody rowed back on these rumours after the smaller device failed to materialise, simply pointing to more ‘sources’ saying there was a lack of distinctiveness in the Surface Mini compared to other devices in the market, so it was pulled.

In short, the Surface Mini was not going to make a dent against the iPad Minis and Nexus 7 clones of the world, so Microsoft would rather spend its limited PR resources and slightly larger marketing budgets on the larger device, which is arguably a unique proposition. It was also clear, given the software that was being demonstrated and the emphasis being placed on creation and collaboration, connectedness and working in a team, that the Surface Pro 3 was being aimed at the Enterprise market.

The Surface Pro 2 and Nokia Lumia 925

Will it be a good consumer machine? I’m pretty sure it will (having spent a long time with the Surface Pro 2, I can confidently say that it fits in rather well with my working style), but the key buyers will not be individuals, they will be corporate buyers, IT departments, and companies buying in bulk. It’s interesting to note that Microsoft emphasised a number of major companies already committed to buying the Surface Pro 3 in the initial press release, including BMW and The Coca-Cola Company.

What does this mean for Windows Phone?

In the short term, not a huge amount. Microsoft needs to ensure that the raw sales figures of Windows Phone handsets at the very least remains steady, and retains market share if at all possible, for the rest of 2014. That means ensuring the transition of Nokia’s Devices and Services division into Redmond is as smooth as possible, and that likely means following any existing marketing plans and device designs.

It’s what happens after that where I think we can make some inference from the Surface Pro 3 strategy.

Surface Pro 3 - the hinge

Much like the tablet market, the consumer smartphone market has solidified behind two smartphone platforms, iOS and Android. Windows Phone has arguably managed to reach a ten percent share of that market – not as much as Microsoft would have hoped when it started out down the Windows Phone road many years ago, but compared to other manufacturers’ attempts (Palm and BlackBerry being the two that spring to mind) Microsoft has done exceptionally well.

Where to go now? Microsoft could continue to go after the generic consumer, and I’m sure part of the strategy will involve that, but I suspect that the Surface Pro 3 strategy of heading into the Enterprise market is going to be the route that many Windows Phone handsets will be asked to follow.

The cloud services that Windows 8 uses are also present on Windows Phone. The collaboration tools may not be as advanced on a mobile handset as they are on the Intel Core i7 tablet/hybrid/ultralapbook/thing that the Surface Pro range represented, but they are present. The big push on OneNote is also reflected in Windows Phone.

In short, everything that Windows Phone is good at, the Surface Pro is good at. And if the Surface Pro is being targeted towards Enterprise, then I expect Windows Phone to follow.

If it does happen, this is smart targeting of the hardware. Windows Phone and Surface Pro machines can be bundled together and sold as a job lot to IT departments, they can integrate with existing Windows architecture in established white-collar business, and Microsoft can leverage existing relationships to get more Windows Phone handsets in the hands of users – all alongside the continued efforts in the personal retail market.

My only fear is that if Microsoft does go down this route, it would have to tread a very thin line between targeted marketing and acting as as a broad church of ‘the third platform’. If it can maintain the 10% market share at a global level, and bring the major regions up to that level, then it can continue to act as a big player… otherwise the strategy is very close to being a ‘niche’ player. Economic history has shown that niche players (and acting as a niche player) will struggle to maintain 5% market share.

Microsoft is going through a process of change, and very soon we will see how this will affect Windows Phone. It’s going to be an interesting change of direction, no matter if it is a slight diversion or a turn as sharp as Lowes Hairpin at Monaco.

Where do you think Nadella will point Windows Phone for 2014 and beyond?

Filed: > >

Platforms: Windows Phone 8
Categories: Comment
 

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All About Windows Phone

Multiple sources point to the addition of a 64GB Moto X

moto_x_red_back_ag_720

Many fans of the Moto X have had a pretty valid complaint for the past few months. For such a great phone, why isn’t a 64GB option offered?! Fans of abundant storage and customizable hardware, listen up!

Mobiltelefon.ru, a Russian phone site, recently discovered traces of a 64GB variant on Motomaker.com. Aside from the obvious “64GB” option plastered all over the page, we can also see a price associated with this phone – $ 449.99. Considering the phone is getting to be a year old, and that’s the off-contract price, that’s a pretty dang good deal.

moto_x_64gb_resize

What’s more is that there is evidence of a 64GB variant in the source code on the Motomaker storage selection page.

182124-64gbmotoxsourcecode

Android Police has also gotten some pretty decent evidence regarding the new storage option, as well. When a new phone is announced, basically all carrier employees get a calendar regarding the need-to-know dates. One of these calendars from Sprint leaked out, showing the approximate launch date. The new storage option should have been available for Sprint on 5/23/14, but that date has already happened. We aren’t counting the phone out completely, though. Sometimes these documents are incorrect… who knows.

Sprint 64gb moto x

We’ve seen more than enough evidence to get ourselves excited for this new storage option. We’ll be sure to let you know if anything else surfaces in the next few weeks. All of this poses one question: Would you still buy a 64GB Moto X this late in the game? We’d love to hear your opinions!

Source: Mobiltelefon.ru, Android Police (1), (2)


AndroidGuys

Corning still talking smack about sapphire; does it have a point, or is it just scared?

When you’re talking about making smartphone displays that are durable enough to withstand the hell we put our phones through on a day-to-day basis, there’s no name bigger than Corning. Its various iterations of Gorilla Glass over the years have protected many a smartphone, but lately the conversation’s been moving from what we can do to toughen-up glass, to what other glass-like materials might make superior screen coverings. Synthetic sapphire crystal has been dominating our imaginations, and rumors suggest that Apple could very well be ramping-up production in an effort to deliver the first mass-market phone protected by such a covering. In a recent interview, Corning VP Tony Tripeny had quite a bit to say about the negative consequences of using sapphire for such a purpose.

Corning talking trash about sapphire is nothing new, and we’ve heard similar comments going back to last spring. In addition to the complaints about sapphire being more brittle than Gorilla Glass, Corning now raises a few new issues. For instance, it points out that sapphire transmits less light than glass, possibly setting up display backlights to be working overtime. The company also mentions the environmental toll sapphire production may result in, consuming far more energy than fabricating comparable Gorilla Glass panels.

Granted, few companies know glass like Corning does, so we’re conflicted between appreciating these concerns as the opinions of experts, and seeing Corning as a commercial entity that’s feeling threatened by the rise of new competition. Is there merit to what it’s saying here? If those Apple rumors pan out, we could know in just a matter of months.

Source: Morgan Stanley (Seeking Alpha)
Via: CNET


Pocketnow

Tilting Point partners with Quark Games for development of ‘core’ mobile titles

tilting-point-650

Quark Games is joining forces with Tilting Point for support in developing a line of mobile games. Quark Games is the fifth developer to partner with Tilting Point, which offers marketing resources, funding and more to developers, while allowing the development team to retain their own creation vision.

Quark Games has previously released Valor and Champs: Battlegrounds, which have been downloaded over 50 million times on iOS and Android.

This partnership will see Quark and Titling Point develop and release multiple titles, with the first currently in production. The games are set to target “core” gamers, and will focus on “strategic, challenging and deeply social gameplay experiences.”

Tilting Point will help these games find exposure through marketing and PR, while also offering monetization strategies and market analytics to Quark Games.

“We believe in making mobile games that give players the ability to affect outcomes through skill and effort. Choices and consequences are what lead to high quality gameplay experiences and emotional impact to the player,” said Eric Peng, founder and CEO of Quark Games. “The team at Tilting Point shares our vision and commitment to building better mobile games and provides us with valuable expertise and resources while allowing us to retain control of our IP.”

Other Tilting Point partners include Toy Rush developer Uber Entertainment, Housemarque, Signal Mobile and 1337 Game Design. More information about Tilting Point’s partners can be found on the company’s website.


Inside Mobile Apps