Tag Archives: smartphone

Send SMS with your Android smartphone from any device with EndlessJabber (Review)

Screen Shot 2014-09-05 at 8.12.19 PM

Send SMS with your Android smartphone from any device with EndlessJabber (Review) Reviewed by on Sep 1. Rating: 5

For years, one of the things I’ve always wanted was an easy way to be able to send text messages while on different devices, especially my laptop or desktop computer. This is one of the main reasons why services like Facebook Messenger and Google Hangouts have always been my go to messenger services since I could just pickup where I left off chatting, whether I was on my desktop at work, laptop at home, tablet or my smartphone.

While I’ve tried a few apps in the past, none were perfect. One of the first that I remember trying many years ago was Koush’s DeskSMS, which to me, wasn’t as reliable and didn’t have as nice an interface as EndlessJabber does.

“To setup the app, it’s extremely simple. All you have to do is head to their website, www.endlessjabber.com, and click install, which will take you to Google Play where you can download the app on your Android smartphone. On your smartphone, go through the setup on the app, which the company says, “takes just 1 tap.” All you’re doing here is connecting the app to your Google account and granting the app access to your text messages, which will then sync all of your text messages to the app. Although they recommend using EvolveSMS from Klinker Apps, whom they partnered with, it works fine with other SMS apps, such as Google Hangouts, my default SMS app. With that done, all you need to do is go to www.endlessjabber.com/web on any other device and sign in to your Google account, then you can chat just as you would on your smartphone but through this web interface seen below.

Screen Shot 2014-09-05 at 8.16.12 PMAll of the text messages on your device will show up when you head to the web interface. Besides just sending messages, you are able to attach photos from the current device you’re using to the SMS, view all your contacts on your smartphone, view a Gallery of photos you’ve been texted and view statistics such as how many texts you’re sending in a day, who you’re texting the most, etc. EndlessJabber will also tell you the current time and how much juice is left in your phone’s battery, just so you can be sure it doesn’t die on you.

The app is very well polished and I think the only issue I noticed is that emoticons didn’t always show up as pictures as they would on your smartphone. They would show up while accessing the web interface on Mozilla Firefox, but didn’t always show up in Google Chrome, although they were unique ones like beer mugs and fireworks. It would also be nice if you were able to access the gallery on your smartphone, but that’s not a deal breaker at all.

EndlessJabber also has a few extras that I wanted to mention. Along with the Android app and web interface, EndlessJabber also has Chrome and Firefox Extensions which will give you a notification whenever you receive a message so you don’t always have to be on that tab to see the messages you receive.

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 10.48.22 AM

One of the best things about the app is that it is free to use, unlike DeskSMS that was about $ 5 a year. Although I didn’t get to test it out, there is a paid version of the app, EndlessJabber Pro, that’s $ 1.99 a month after a free 7 day. It extends the experience with some “pro” features including JabberMode that enables you to instantly send and receive SMS messages by bypassing the free Google Cloud Messaging infrastructure, Search, so you can search for a specific text or bit of info you received, themes, the ability to schedule texts in advance to send at a later time, more analytics as well as XMPP integration to use it with other chat clients such as Pidgin and Trillian, among other features.

One last thing, EndlessJabber is currently seeking to raise funds through Kickstarter to help its app grow, since they are a small startup. Check out the campaign here.They note that funds from the campaign will be used to determine the appropriate marketing strategy to achieve their goals, find an appropriate marketing firm and execute on the marketing strategy. If you do decide to contribute, you can get nice rewards such as EndlessJabber Pro subscriptions, visibility on their site and social networks and even a t-shirt. Some of these rewards are pretty nice, especially since most will give you a discount on a pro subscription.

If EndlessJabber sounds like something you’ve been waiting for, don’t hesitate to check it out! If you need a little more help using EndlessJabber, here’s more info on their blog.


AndroidGuys

Five smartphone problems you’d think they’d have fixed by now

As fun as it can be to marginalize and criticize them, smartphones are magical pieces of technology. From something as benign as an iPhone to a device as futuristic as a G Flex, today’s pocket communicators are modern miracles of miniaturized intelligence. As I say at the top of every Weekly podcast, these real-life tools are the manifestation of many childhood dreams, mine included … and it’s incredible to stop and think about just how complex they really are.

All of which makes it doubly frustrating when these supposedly “smart” devices screw up so spectacularly. Here’s five smartphone problems we deal with on a daily basis that should’ve been fixed a long time ago.

Putting your phone down rotates the screen

We’ve all been there: while holding your phone in your hand, you call up a webpage in the browser. In the middle of scrolling through the latest hot news from the world of alpaca farming, you decide to put your phone down alongside your computer so you can take notes on what to feed Tina while grandma’s out of town. You plop your phone down on the table, angling it ever-so-lightly to get your hand out from underneath, and: boom. Suddenly you’re in landscape mode and nothing about the world makes sense anymore.

Dear God why?!

Dear God why?!

It wouldn’t be such a big deal if it didn’t happen nearly every time you put your phone down, and if it hadn’t been happening for so damn long. But we’ve had accelerometers in our phones for over seven years now; it’s about time they got a little smarter.

Notifications ruin your music

This isn’t a problem on all platforms; iOS in particular fields this one pretty well, and Windows Phone isn’t far behind. With this one we’re looking squarely at Android, and we’ve been looking at it for years.

This out-of-context graphic should illustrate my feelings nicely.

This out-of-context graphic from a far more important story encapsulates my feelings nicely.

Anyone who gets a lot of notifications and listens to a lot of audio on the go (and does these simultaneously) should be familiar with the issue we’re talking about. When a notification comes in, the podcast, FM stream, or music track you’re listening to will suddenly cut out to accommodate the chime, then return just as abruptly. Like the screen-rotation issue above, it’s not the worst thing in the world when it happens every once in a while, but if you’re in the midst of a rapid-fire text exchange or you’re copied on one of those insufferable reply-all email chains, it renders whatever show or track you’re trying to hear unlistenable. To Google’s credit, this isn’t as big a problem as it used to be: both Google Play Music and Spotify will now intelligently duck the playing audio to accommodate the inbound alert and then scale it up shortly afterward. But if you use a service like Stitcher or TuneIn to stream podcasts or local radio and you get a lot of messages over the course of the day, expect to have your listening experience interrupted on the regular.

And Windows Phone’s not totally blameless, either: system sounds like the little raindrop screen-unlock effect result in a partial muting of playing audio for a few seconds after the sound playback is complete. We appreciate the concern for our eardrums, Microsoft, but c’mon. We’re more rugged than that.

Speaking of which …

Your phone is an overprotective nanny

"Also, haven't you been spending enough time on your phone? It's a beautiful day outside; go get some exercise! And have you cleaned your room?"

“Also, haven’t you been spending enough time on your phone? It’s a beautiful day outside; go get some exercise! And have you cleaned your room?”

Android, stop with this. One warning out of the box is enough. We don’t need to be reminded about potential hearing damage every time we want to crank up the volume on The Very Best of Enya. For God’s sake, let us rock out.

Leaving a WiFi hotspot gives it separation anxiety

Ever try loading a website, podcast, or Facebook page while you’re in the dreaded death zone between WiFi and a cellular data connection? Ever succeed?

No you haven't, you liar. Go get truthful and try again.

No you haven’t. Stop lying.

Wireless carriers love to train your smartphone to prefer a WiFi hotspot above all else, because it takes the strain off their own overtaxed networks. We’ve seen this trend strengthen over the years with software “features” that command your phone to look for WiFi even when WiFi is off, timers that reconnect WiFi after a certain period of dormancy, and default preferences that force your phone to try to connect to every Starbucks and McDonald’s access point you get close to (despite not actually having enough signal to pass any data over that connection).

All of these actively diminish the experience of using a smartphone, and some actually prevent the device from fulfilling one of its primary functions: notifying you of inbound alerts. Because when your phone is ignoring the strong 4G signal shouting to it from a cell site down the street in favor of the unusable WiFi signal from the cafe in the building across the road, it’s not able to send you that Snapchat that tells you where the secret house party is. And that sucks.

No matter how clean you are, your screen is usually filthy

That'll teach you to eat and tweet.

That’ll teach you to eat and tweet.

In the switch from small clamshells to tablet-sized cutting boards, we gained a lot of screen real estate and a much richer multimedia experience on our smartphones. But we also provided a much bigger canvas for all that skin oil to spread out on, and the result has been a world full of the filthiest slabs of oily glass ever countenanced.

Some phones do better at managing this organic oil slick than others; pick up a low-end smartphone like the Lumia 635 for a firsthand look at what happens when you skimp on oleophobic coating. But even the highest of top-shelf handsets on the market today have a tendency to hold on to finger and face oils with a grip that defies efforts to dislodge them. Even phones specifically designed to handle foreign droplets with “wet screen tracking” technology usually don’t work that well after the first good spray hits them. And if the all-glass front is mirrored on the back side for fashion’s sake, the problem is doubled. Don’t get me wrong; the all-glass smartphone is still a very hip look. I just wish it didn’t come with the caveat that I’d have to wear gloves every time I wanted to pick the thing up, or risk looking like the world’s greasiest man.

Go take a shower, ya filthy animal.

Go take a shower, ya filthy animal.

Think you’ve got a better list of the world’s biggest smartphone problems? Let us know about it down in the comments, then check out what else we’re shaking our canes at in our editorials on why Windows Phone shouldn’t be trying to ape Android and 8 ways to tell if your mobile app sucks!

 


Pocketnow

Huawei teases sapphire-screened smartphone

Smartphones with scratch-resistant sapphire crystal protecting their displays are no longer the stuff of bank-breaking luxury phones; with the launch of the Kyocera Brigadier, they’re soundly within reach of the average smartphone buyer. Still, sapphire’s arrived with more of a whimper than a bang, and it remains to be seen if efforts from big names like Apple will be what the material needs to really go mainstream. Another manufacturer has just stepped forward with news of a sapphire-screened handset of its own, as Huawei confirms rumors about its plans for a sapphire-covered version of this year’s Ascend P7.

The sapphire P7 was first teased by company exec Yu Chengdong earlier this month, but a new post to his Weibo account this week directly confirms the news. We don’t have anything like a launch date just yet, but with IFA so close by, it’s hard to read this news without thinking about a possible announcement at the trade show.

We’ve also got questions about the hardware itself, not the least of which being just how much sapphire we’re talking about. After all, the Ascend P7 is one of those phones with a glass back as well as front, and it’s not clear if Huawei intends to only give the display side the sapphire treatment, or if that might extend all the way around the phone’s body.

Similarly, we haven’t heard anything about any other internal hardware changing, so until we’re told differently, we’ll be expecting this new P7 to sport another five-inch 1080p display, have a 13MP main camera with 8MP front-facer, and run a quad-core Kirin 910T SoC,

Source: Huawei (Weibo)
Via: GSM Arena


Pocketnow

HTC working on an octa-core 64-bit smartphone

IMG_0005.JPG

HTC are currently developing what will be the worlds first octa-core 64-bit smartphone.

According to Chinese site Weibo, HTC will be building their future on a Qualcomm’s next-generation 64-bit processor, of which the first is looking to be the Snapdragon 615. The higher powered Snapdragon 808 and 810 aren’t being released until later this year.

So the worlds first octa-core 64-bit device is looking to be a mid-range device, but still a pretty exciting prospect right?

SOURCE


AndroidGuys

HTC working on an octa-core 64-bit smartphone

IMG_0005.JPG

HTC are currently developing what will be the worlds first octa-core 64-bit smartphone.

According to Chinese site Weibo, HTC will be building their future on a Qualcomm’s next-generation 64-bit processor, of which the first is looking to be the Snapdragon 615. The higher powered Snapdragon 808 and 810 aren’t being released until later this year.

So the worlds first octa-core 64-bit device is looking to be a mid-range device, but still a pretty exciting prospect right?

SOURCE


AndroidGuys

HTC teases 64-bit smartphone for IFA 2014

Last week, HTC cut though a lot of the uncertainty surrounding its own plans for IFA 2014, dropping a teaser that pretty unambiguously referred to the rumored Desire 820. While on its own, another Desire mid-ranger might not be the most exciting news in the world, the 820′s been holding out attention by way of the SoC expected to power the phone, one of Qualcomm’s new 64-bit Snapdragons. With just a week to go before the expo, that connection is really starting to firm up, and HTC just published a new teaser that not only gives us a new glimpse of the smartphone, but appears to confirm that 64-bit chip.

The Chinese text in the image above refers to the world’s first 64-bit octa-core smartphone. Based on the SoCs we know Qualcomm’s been producing, that sounds like it should be the Snapdragon 615.

And while this teaser doesn’t outright say “Desire 820,” the fact that this is clearly another IFA promo (check the date), and that HTC has continued to talk about the 820 making its debut next week, makes it hard to think of another more likely candidate that this pic could be in reference to.

Will 64-bit Androids be a big hit, or is this one hardware spec that might look nice on paper, but struggle to deliver real-world improvements? It sure looks like we’re about to find out.

Source: HTC (Weibo)
Via: GSM Arena


Pocketnow

Kyocera Brigadier durability test: scratching up a sapphire smartphone (Video)

It’s one of the top buzzwords of the year in mobile technology: the sapphire screen. More appropriately called a sapphire crystal display, its remarkability lies not in clarity or resolution or thumb-feel … but in saving us from our oafish, clumsy-handed selves.

Sapphire crystal is hard, see – harder than anything on the good ‘ole Mohs hardness scale except diamond (as we discussed in a piece last year on why sapphire is awesome). And since we don’t generally carry diamonds in our pockets on the regular, the thinking goes that a sapphire screen would be harder than anything that could potentially scratch it – such as the quartz of beach sand, avowed nemesis of glass smartphone displays everywhere.

It’s thinking like this which led GT Advanced Technologies to acquire the sapphire production facility we toured last year, thinking like this which has fueled endless speculation about just why Apple recently bought a sapphire production facility of its very own. But the first sapphire screen-packing smartphone to arrive in our review labs comes not from Apple but from Kyocera, and it comes with sapphire crystal not from GT Crystal Systems, but from Kyocera itself.

Kyocera_Brigadier_Mud

It’s the Kyocera Brigadier, a rugged smartphone for Verizon Wireless featuring MIL-STD 810G and IP68 durability, a Snapdragon 400 processor backed up by 2GB of RAM, and a 4.5″ 720p display protected by a single sheet of Kyocera’s very own synthetic sapphire crystal.

The company was so confident about its scratch-resistant display protection that it even sent along a testing kit with the Brigadier –a smartphone torture set of sorts– containing everything from steel wool to coins to knives to honest-to-God rocks, all of it begging … no, daring us to test it.

And test it we did.

kyocera brigadier testing kit

Did we manage to scratch the very first sapphire screen we’ve ever laid hands on? You bet we did – but while you might be disappointed to learn that it took no diamonds to accomplish that feat, you’ll be glad (or at least entertained) to see just how much grief we had to give the Brigadier to earn those scratches.

Join us, then, for our Kyocera Brigadier torture test below. And if you want a refresher on just how synthetic sapphire screens come into being, we’ve embedded our GT Crystal Systems tour down at the bottom as well, in case you’re in a learning mood. Enjoy!

How to scratch a sapphire screen


Pocketnow

Xiaomi & Micromax will challenge the current smartphone Big 2

Fitch predicts Apple & Samsung’s handset marketshare will stagnate

micromax ad mocking apple

It seems that the Big Two smartphone vendors – Apple & Samsung are going to be facing a very tough future thanks to competition in emerging markets. As a consequence, Fitch Ratings is predicting that local handset makers such as China’s Xiaomi, Lenovo, and Huawei along with India’s Micromax will become the main competitors for Apple and Samsung. Locally manufactured devices retailing at $ 100 to $ 300 can offer virtually all of the key features of big brand smartphones. Plus Fitch also believes that the forthcoming iPhone 6 probably won’t do enough to bolster Apple.

Although the iPhone 6 is rumoured to be launching in September [2014] with a larger screen, Apple’s “developments are likely to be incremental rather than revolutionary,” Fitch says.

It continued, “We believe that the innovations – which include curved screens and compatible wearable devices – are unlikely to change the trend facing Samsung and Apple.”

The chief problem the pair face is that India and China together are expected to account for over 60 per cent of growth in smartphone shipment volumes.

Samsung’s and Apple’s global smartphone shipment market share will decline to around 25 per cent and 14 per cent, respectively, by 2015 (2013: 31 per cent and 15 per cent), says Fitch.

According to data from IDC, Xiaomi took the lead in China with 15 million devices with a market share of 15 per cent – ahead of Samsung’s 12 per cent by shipping 13.2 million smartphones.

Fitch continued, “We expect the Big Two’s combined smartphone shipment volume to stagnate at around 450 million-460 million units in 2014 (2013: 467 million), even as the global smartphone market rises by around 20 per cent to 1.2 billion.”

Fitch estimates that smartphones now account for roughly two-thirds of the global handset market, whilst IDC says that global smartphone shipment volumes increased by 5 per cent in 2Q14 to 295 million units (1Q14: 281 million units).

Interestingly, Fitch added, “We believe that the innovations – which include curved screens and compatible wearable devices – are unlikely to change the trend facing Samsung and Apple.”

The fact that Fitch says it doesn’t expect these trends to affect Samsung’s credit rating (A+/Stable) appears to point to the fact that whilst the Big Two might lose their dominance of smartphones, they might be able to replace ‘lost’ smartphone revenues with profits from the emerging wearables market.

Rajveer Singh Rathore is a Microsoft consultant working with who worked in enterprise IT services and solutions provider. He is a blogger, a reader and a social media enthusiast who loves to observe and share insights about Microsoft technologies. To know more about him, follow him on Twitter @hearthackersss.


GoMo News

Xiaomi & Micromax will challenge the current smartphone Big 2

Fitch predicts Apple & Samsung’s handset marketshare will stagnate

micromax ad mocking apple

It seems that the Big Two smartphone vendors – Apple & Samsung are going to be facing a very tough future thanks to competition in emerging markets. As a consequence, Fitch Ratings is predicting that local handset makers such as China’s Xiaomi, Lenovo, and Huawei along with India’s Micromax will become the main competitors for Apple and Samsung. Locally manufactured devices retailing at $ 100 to $ 300 can offer virtually all of the key features of big brand smartphones. Plus Fitch also believes that the forthcoming iPhone 6 probably won’t do enough to bolster Apple.

Although the iPhone 6 is rumoured to be launching in September [2014] with a larger screen, Apple’s “developments are likely to be incremental rather than revolutionary,” Fitch says.

It continued, “We believe that the innovations – which include curved screens and compatible wearable devices – are unlikely to change the trend facing Samsung and Apple.”

The chief problem the pair face is that India and China together are expected to account for over 60 per cent of growth in smartphone shipment volumes.

Samsung’s and Apple’s global smartphone shipment market share will decline to around 25 per cent and 14 per cent, respectively, by 2015 (2013: 31 per cent and 15 per cent), says Fitch.

According to data from IDC, Xiaomi took the lead in China with 15 million devices with a market share of 15 per cent – ahead of Samsung’s 12 per cent by shipping 13.2 million smartphones.

Fitch continued, “We expect the Big Two’s combined smartphone shipment volume to stagnate at around 450 million-460 million units in 2014 (2013: 467 million), even as the global smartphone market rises by around 20 per cent to 1.2 billion.”

Fitch estimates that smartphones now account for roughly two-thirds of the global handset market, whilst IDC says that global smartphone shipment volumes increased by 5 per cent in 2Q14 to 295 million units (1Q14: 281 million units).

Interestingly, Fitch added, “We believe that the innovations – which include curved screens and compatible wearable devices – are unlikely to change the trend facing Samsung and Apple.”

The fact that Fitch says it doesn’t expect these trends to affect Samsung’s credit rating (A+/Stable) appears to point to the fact that whilst the Big Two might lose their dominance of smartphones, they might be able to replace ‘lost’ smartphone revenues with profits from the emerging wearables market.

Rajveer Singh Rathore is a Microsoft consultant working with who worked in enterprise IT services and solutions provider. He is a blogger, a reader and a social media enthusiast who loves to observe and share insights about Microsoft technologies. To know more about him, follow him on Twitter @hearthackersss.


GoMo News

Xiaomi & Micromax will challenge the current smartphone Big 2

Fitch predicts Apple & Samsung’s handset marketshare will stagnate

micromax ad mocking apple

It seems that the Big Two smartphone vendors – Apple & Samsung are going to be facing a very tough future thanks to competition in emerging markets. As a consequence, Fitch Ratings is predicting that local handset makers such as China’s Xiaomi, Lenovo, and Huawei along with India’s Micromax will become the main competitors for Apple and Samsung. Locally manufactured devices retailing at $ 100 to $ 300 can offer virtually all of the key features of big brand smartphones. Plus Fitch also believes that the forthcoming iPhone 6 probably won’t do enough to bolster Apple.

Although the iPhone 6 is rumoured to be launching in September [2014] with a larger screen, Apple’s “developments are likely to be incremental rather than revolutionary,” Fitch says.

It continued, “We believe that the innovations – which include curved screens and compatible wearable devices – are unlikely to change the trend facing Samsung and Apple.”

The chief problem the pair face is that India and China together are expected to account for over 60 per cent of growth in smartphone shipment volumes.

Samsung’s and Apple’s global smartphone shipment market share will decline to around 25 per cent and 14 per cent, respectively, by 2015 (2013: 31 per cent and 15 per cent), says Fitch.

According to data from IDC, Xiaomi took the lead in China with 15 million devices with a market share of 15 per cent – ahead of Samsung’s 12 per cent by shipping 13.2 million smartphones.

Fitch continued, “We expect the Big Two’s combined smartphone shipment volume to stagnate at around 450 million-460 million units in 2014 (2013: 467 million), even as the global smartphone market rises by around 20 per cent to 1.2 billion.”

Fitch estimates that smartphones now account for roughly two-thirds of the global handset market, whilst IDC says that global smartphone shipment volumes increased by 5 per cent in 2Q14 to 295 million units (1Q14: 281 million units).

Interestingly, Fitch added, “We believe that the innovations – which include curved screens and compatible wearable devices – are unlikely to change the trend facing Samsung and Apple.”

The fact that Fitch says it doesn’t expect these trends to affect Samsung’s credit rating (A+/Stable) appears to point to the fact that whilst the Big Two might lose their dominance of smartphones, they might be able to replace ‘lost’ smartphone revenues with profits from the emerging wearables market.

Rajveer Singh Rathore is a Microsoft consultant working with who worked in enterprise IT services and solutions provider. He is a blogger, a reader and a social media enthusiast who loves to observe and share insights about Microsoft technologies. To know more about him, follow him on Twitter @hearthackersss.


GoMo News