Tag Archives: want

Want to win a BlackBerry Motion? Here’s how to do it

TCL launched the BlackBerry Motion keyboard-less smartphone on the US market back at CES 2018. Well if you haven’t placed an order for the device yet, here’s your chance of getting the phone – for free!

Gentlemen’s Choice has partnered up with BlackBerry to let you win a free BlackBerry Motion Android handset. The contest is open worldwide and all you have to do to join is the following:

  1. Follow @gentlemenschoice and @blackberrymobile on Instagram
  2. Leave a comment in which you tag 3 friends
  3. Want an extra entry? Comment on this post with the name of a BlackBerry you once owned

If you wouldn’t mind winning a free BlackBerry Motion you have until February 02, 2018 to join the contest.

Don’t forget the Motion is the first BlackBerry smartphone to be water-resistant. The handset also comes boasting a 5.5-inch display with 1920 x 1080 resolution and a Snapdragon 625, aided by 4GB of RAM and 32GB of storage. The Motion relies on a pretty impressive 4,000 mAh out of the box and has a physical home button with the company’s logo on it.

And even if the BlackBerry Motion ships out with Android Nougat out the box, the Oreo update is expected to arrive sometime later this year.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

AndroidGuys

Why I want a smartphone that can charge other Qi devices

The summer of smartwatches is upon us, and new Android Wear users everywhere are just starting to settle into life with their mobile accessories. The Moto 360 is standing by in the wings, ready to jump onto the retail scene in just another month or two, and entries by Apple and Microsoft are anticipated for a little later on. No matter which platform you call home, or what style smartwatch you prefer, you’re going to have some good options to choose from.

And as more and more of these wearables arrive, we’re seeing how the decisions being made by manufacturers are shaping out expectations for these devices. Despite Pebble’s early success, for example, bright, colorful (power hungry) displays seem to have become the norm. And since no one wants a smartwatch that’s overly big and bulky, batteries have remained on the petite side.

moto-360-leather-bandThat combination leads us to an uncomfortable reality: battery life ain’t gonna be great. “OK,” perhaps, giving us a solid day of use, but week-long operation on a single charge seems like it’s going to be a pipe dream for the foreseeable future.

This means having to charge our smartwatches regularly. With how frequently we’ll be doing it, making this process as convenient as possible is going to be a big deal, and we’ve already shared with you the sort of complaints that happen when manufacturer efforts fall up short.

But at least some of these OEMs seem to really get it, and Motorola looks like it’s talking the promising step of equipping its Moto 360 with support for wireless Qi charging.

That sounds great: just drop your watch on a charger, as easily as you’d set it on your nightstand before bed. But one issue that’s come up as we’ve discussed smartwatches the past couple weeks on the Pocketnow Weekly podcast has been what that requirement for a smartphone-specific charger means when you’re traveling.

nexus-4-charger-qiMost wireless chargers today are single-device models, so even if your phone supported it too, you’d either be carrying around at least two chargers with you (one phone, one smartwatch), or swapping back and forth between charging your phone and watch as the need arrived – not exactly the paragon of convenience.

And then a lightbulb appeared over my head: why can’t the phone charge the watch?

Here’s what I’m thinking: there’s not a lot-lot different between the charging coil in a phone that receives wireless power and the coil in the charger that transmits the energy. We’d need some additional driving circuitry in place (and maybe even a second coil – but honestly, there’s room), but it’s not a crazy idea that we could use our phones to wirelessly charge accessories like smartwatches.

Remember that ZENS Qi Wireless Charger we shared with you a few months back? Think that, instead of just a dumb battery, it’s your phone. And instead of lugging around a bulky wireless charger with you while traveling, you’d bring a regular old micro USB charger.

At the end of the day, you’d plug your phone into the wall, but then set your smartwatch right on the phone itself. And as your phone fills up its 2x00mAh battery overnight, it wirelessly shares some of that juice with the smartwatch and its smaller 3-400mAh cell.

qi-coil

Hell, why even constrain this to use with smartwatches? Every smartphone with  wireless charging should support transferring power as well as receiving it. Just as we can tap phones together to transfer content thanks to NFC and Bluetooth, what if sharing power was as easy as sharing photos? Set your fully-charged phone down, place your friend’s phone with a dead battery on top, and send it some of that power!

I realize I’m probably getting wildly ahead of myself here – wireless charging has still only flirted with mainstream acceptance by this point, and demanding ambitious new features might be something more worth considering after we’ve reached milestones like getting wireless charging support on all flagship devices by default (hell no, add-on charging backs), and getting the industry to decide on one standard (I mean, it already is Qi, but a few bad apples just can’t seem to accept that).

Just as smartphones evolved from devices we used to consume content to ones we use to produce it, let’s have an evolution that moves them past being mere consumers of power to devices that can act as conduits, sharing it with other products in our lives.


Pocketnow

Why I want a smartphone that can charge other Qi devices

The summer of smartwatches is upon us, and new Android Wear users everywhere are just starting to settle into life with their mobile accessories. The Moto 360 is standing by in the wings, ready to jump onto the retail scene in just another month or two, and entries by Apple and Microsoft are anticipated for a little later on. No matter which platform you call home, or what style smartwatch you prefer, you’re going to have some good options to choose from.

And as more and more of these wearables arrive, we’re seeing how the decisions being made by manufacturers are shaping out expectations for these devices. Despite Pebble’s early success, for example, bright, colorful (power hungry) displays seem to have become the norm. And since no one wants a smartwatch that’s overly big and bulky, batteries have remained on the petite side.

moto-360-leather-bandThat combination leads us to an uncomfortable reality: battery life ain’t gonna be great. “OK,” perhaps, giving us a solid day of use, but week-long operation on a single charge seems like it’s going to be a pipe dream for the foreseeable future.

This means having to charge our smartwatches regularly. With how frequently we’ll be doing it, making this process as convenient as possible is going to be a big deal, and we’ve already shared with you the sort of complaints that happen when manufacturer efforts fall up short.

But at least some of these OEMs seem to really get it, and Motorola looks like it’s talking the promising step of equipping its Moto 360 with support for wireless Qi charging.

That sounds great: just drop your watch on a charger, as easily as you’d set it on your nightstand before bed. But one issue that’s come up as we’ve discussed smartwatches the past couple weeks on the Pocketnow Weekly podcast has been what that requirement for a smartphone-specific charger means when you’re traveling.

nexus-4-charger-qiMost wireless chargers today are single-device models, so even if your phone supported it too, you’d either be carrying around at least two chargers with you (one phone, one smartwatch), or swapping back and forth between charging your phone and watch as the need arrived – not exactly the paragon of convenience.

And then a lightbulb appeared over my head: why can’t the phone charge the watch?

Here’s what I’m thinking: there’s not a lot-lot different between the charging coil in a phone that receives wireless power and the coil in the charger that transmits the energy. We’d need some additional driving circuitry in place (and maybe even a second coil – but honestly, there’s room), but it’s not a crazy idea that we could use our phones to wirelessly charge accessories like smartwatches.

Remember that ZENS Qi Wireless Charger we shared with you a few months back? Think that, instead of just a dumb battery, it’s your phone. And instead of lugging around a bulky wireless charger with you while traveling, you’d bring a regular old micro USB charger.

At the end of the day, you’d plug your phone into the wall, but then set your smartwatch right on the phone itself. And as your phone fills up its 2x00mAh battery overnight, it wirelessly shares some of that juice with the smartwatch and its smaller 3-400mAh cell.

qi-coil

Hell, why even constrain this to use with smartwatches? Every smartphone with  wireless charging should support transferring power as well as receiving it. Just as we can tap phones together to transfer content thanks to NFC and Bluetooth, what if sharing power was as easy as sharing photos? Set your fully-charged phone down, place your friend’s phone with a dead battery on top, and send it some of that power!

I realize I’m probably getting wildly ahead of myself here – wireless charging has still only flirted with mainstream acceptance by this point, and demanding ambitious new features might be something more worth considering after we’ve reached milestones like getting wireless charging support on all flagship devices by default (hell no, add-on charging backs), and getting the industry to decide on one standard (I mean, it already is Qi, but a few bad apples just can’t seem to accept that).

Just as smartphones evolved from devices we used to consume content to ones we use to produce it, let’s have an evolution that moves them past being mere consumers of power to devices that can act as conduits, sharing it with other products in our lives.


Pocketnow

If the Nexus 6 is anything like the LG G3, you’re going to want one

We have it on good authority that the focus of this week’s Google I/O 2014 event will be Android Wear. The company’s new smartwatch platform looks poised to bring us some of the most compelling wearable offerings ever, with devices to satisfy desires both subtle and gross. While I can’t wait to see what Google has cooked up for the wrists of the world, I also can’t help hoping that Wednesday’s announcements will bring us more news from the smartphone side of Mountain View’s portfolio. Specifically, news of the (possibly) forthcoming Nexus 6.

You’d be right in calling this expectation premature, even stupid. Nexus smartphone launches are typically an autumn affair, and I’m not seriously expecting a Nexus 6 to break cover this week. The reason this possibly-nonexistent smartphone is stirring my imagination on this day in particular is thanks to another device we’ve recently spent some time with: the excellent LG G3.

Based on past experience, there’s solid reason to think the Nexus 6, if built by LG, will hew closely to the design of the company’s newest flagship. In case you missed our coverage of that device, there’s an awful lot to like about it: I called it the most intriguing Android halo device the company has ever offered in our full review, and Taylor Martin backed me up in his review rebuttal, calling the G3 an exquisite take on the modern flagship.

The Nexus 6 may never arrive. If it does, it may not be made by LG at all. In fact, the entire Nexus program may well fall victim to Android Silver. But assuming the G3 does come to market as some kind of “pure Android” offering, whether as a Google Play Edition device or one of the above improbable scenarios, there’s good reason to get excited. Here’s three reasons why.

A Design That Actually Says Something

lg-g3-review-rebuttal-1

I’m not saying they’re ugly phones (so those of you who’ve already raced to the comments to defend your Nexus purchases can chill for a sec). Nevertheless, I’d argue that the Nexus devices of the past two years have succeeded despite, rather than due to, their looks. Of course LG and Google were constrained by price when designing and manufacturing the Nexus 4 and 5, and in the case of the latter, Google made a conscious decision to create the most minimal hardware possible in order to let the software shine. But in both cases, what resulted was a rather unremarkable slab.

That’s not the case with the G3, and if even some of its aesthetic makes it through the conversion process to a “Nexus 6,” we’ll have a brilliant looker on our hands. In my view, the G3 strikes an almost perfect balance between portability and beauty, with a lightweight chassis that’s comfortable to hold, but which also looks edgier and “faster” than any other LG smartphone. The edge-to-edge display, anchored by the modern, minimal chin down below, works together with the redesigned rear keys and the “floating arc” curve to give the G3 a very distinct personality. It feels like a very advanced piece of technology, but one that’s not so advanced as to seem showboat-y or inaccessible.

Expandability and Extensibility

lg g3 expandability

Sometimes beauty comes with a heavy cost in terms of extensibility and expandability. (That’s lame tech jargon for “sometimes pretty phones sacrifice power for looks.”) Not so with the G3. Despite its seemingly seamless construction, it only takes a thumbnail under a side-tab to pop the G3′s back cover loose, revealing a user-replaceable 3000 mAh battery and a MicroSD slot for up to 128GB of additional storage space. While these are becoming more prevalent additions to modern phones, they’re still rare finds on a good-looking flagship device –the HTC One M8 needs an embedded battery to preserve its aesthetics– and with a Quad-HD display soaking up a lot of power, carrying a spare battery in a side pocket might not be the worst idea for G3 owners.

Granted, it’s entirely possible these features would be intentionally omitted by Google if the G3 were ever to undergo a Nexus 6-type conversion. Google tends to favor pushing its cloud-based Drive solution over MicroSD, and the last two Nexus iterations have featured sealed-in batteries. Plus, it’s uncertain Google would retain support for awesome accessories like the Quick Circle case, which supports only LG-built apps. But in my book, even that would be an acceptable compromise with a Nexus-ified G3, because …

Stock Android Would Only Make It Better

kitkatUI2-1024x606

Of all the arguments in favor of a Google-sourced G3, this one is perhaps the lamest in that it’s the most predictable. The purpose of a mobile tech blogger, it seems, is at least partly to hate on third-party UIs while espousing the virtues of stock Android. And given our mostly-positive feelings regarding LG’s new Android skin for the G3, this seems like an even-less-necessary callout.

But spend two seconds with the stock KitKat launcher on the G3, and you’ll see where I’m coming from. I used KK Launcher to simulate the experience for this editorial, and while it’s not a perfect substitute, it certainly offers a mouth-watering window into the possibilities once LG’s skin is out of the way. This is less an indictment of LG’s software design than praise for Google’s: as we said in our full review, stock 4.4 KitKat represents “the most responsive, attractive, and useful version of Android we’ve ever encountered,” and that’s even more evident on a 5.5-inch device that’s nearly all-screen. Sure, we’d like to see better support for the G3′s high resolution, but that’s something which would come with an official Nexus release. And replacing LG’s embryonic Smart Notice with one-swipe access to Google Now would eliminate the kind of redundancy that’s unavoidable when it comes to third-party UIs. As much as we like some manufacturer software, stock is usually still better.

lg g3 nexus 6 2

None of this is earth-shattering, and it’s likely that none of it will come to pass. In some ways, this is applying old-world thinking to a new Android model … one which will no doubt surprise all of us if and when it breaks cover. In the interim, though, it’s always fun to speculate on the geeky halo devices of tomorrow – so help us do that! Drop a comment down below letting us know what you’d most like to see from a hypothetical Nexus 6, and don’t forget to check out our newest podcast where we discuss the LG G3 in depth with none other than MKBHD!


Pocketnow

Whose voice do you want for your phone’s virtual assistant? (Poll)

On last week’s edition of the Pocketnow Weekly (093: NEVER SETTLE), we shared with you a piece of listener mail asking us about our preferences when it comes to voice assistants – not the service itself, but the voices. Right now, there’s not a lot of variety out there for our choices for how our phone sounds when it speaks to us: maybe we can select between male and female, or choose from a few accents, but even that represents more options than many users have. But this piece of listener mail wasn’t about what we prefer among available options: what if we could have our phone speak to us in any voice we wanted? Who would we choose?

Sure, you can ask Siri what films are playing nearby, but wouldn’t it be awesome if you could ask Michael Caine, instead? Or if Jimmy Stewart could nervously ramble off the weather forecast?

Smartphone voice assistants and the language synthesis tech they use may still feel relatively new, but there’s a lot of room for flexibility here. Remember in the not-too-long-ago past when celebrity voices for GPS navigators were all the rage? It’s arguably only a matter of time before we start seeing the same sort of deal for the Siris, Google Nows, and Cortanas of the world.

So what we want to know is: if you had your say about what voice your phone would have, who you would choose? We’re running a poll to find out what you guys think, and have started it off with some options, but feel free to write-in your own. May the best voice win!


Pocketnow

T-Mobile lets customers JUMP! to new devices as often as they want

t-mobile_jump_720

Forget waiting to upgrade your phone (or tablet), T-Mobile says do it today

T-Mobile, in yet another mind-boggling awesome deal, has decided customers don’t need to wait to upgrade their devices. Forget that waiting period and twice a year stuff; if you want a new smartphone or tablet, you got it.

The carrier has confirmed with FierceWireless that it will reconfigure its “JUMP!” upgrade program effective February 23. No longer tied to handsets, the program will also include tablets. Under the old program customers were expected to wait six months or were limited to twice per year.

Whenever you’re ready to upgrade, trade in your device and T-Mobile will pay your remaining device payments up to 50% of the device cost. There is no more waiting period or limit to the number of times you can upgrade per year. – T-Mobile

What’s the fine print? Customers will need to have paid down 50 percent (or more) of the device cost before it’s eligible to trade in. T-Mobile will take your old product back and pay off the difference; you select the new one.

Reportedly, customers under the current JUMP! program will stay put until the next upgrade.

FierceWireless

Article Tags

Related Posts


AndroidGuys

Consumers worldwide want more banking via smartphones FICO survey finds

Account balances and security alerts most requested features

Press release

opportunity for forward-thinking banks – wells

January 6th 2014. FICO (NYSE:FICO),  a leading predictive analytics and decision management software company, has just released the results of an international survey of smartphone consumers showing that they want to do much more mobile banking than most of today’s smartphone apps permit. Whilst the most requested functionality is the ability to check account balances (75 per cent), more than half of respondents want to receive notifications of potential fraudulent activity (59 per cent), make payments from their account (53 per cent) and transfer money between their accounts (50 per cent) using their smartphone.

The demographic breakdown showed that across all categories, young people showed the most interest in banking services delivered by smartphone.

When it came to specific product services such as receiving credit card bill payment reminders and credit card limit warnings, people aged 25 to 39 were the most interested in delivery by smartphone.

The least popular service, according to the findings, was to receive information about new products and services (39 per cent).

Interest in this dropped with age, with only 6.5 percent of over 55s attracted to the idea.

The survey also found that men were more interested in smartphone banking services than women – by an average of three to four percentage points across all age groups.

The survey looked at consumer preferences and tendencies with regards to mobile, online and in-person interactions with banks.

It included 2,239 adult smartphone users in the UK, Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, Turkey and the USA.

“Over one billion consumers worldwide have smartphones in their pockets, so it stands to reason that many of them would want to conduct their banking using those devices,” said Stuart Wells, FICO’s executive vp & Chief Product and Technology Officer (CTO).

“For forward-thinking banks, this presents an unprecedented opportunity to differentiate themselves and strengthen their relationships with their customers.”

“The unique ability to combine voice, applications, text, and location information with powerful analytics, personalisation and automated communications make mobile banking much more significant than previous channel expansions, including the advent of ATMs or even online banking,” Wells added.

The banking preferences of smartphone consumers from the USA, Australia, Brazil, China and the UK can be explored in further detail at a special interactive website here.

About FICO

FICO, formerly known as Fair Isaac, is a leading analytics software company, helping businesses in 80+ countries make better decisions that drive higher levels of growth, profitability and customer satisfaction. The company’s groundbreaking use of Big Data and mathematical algorithms to predict consumer behavior has transformed entire industries. FICO provides analytics software and tools used across multiple industries to manage risk, fight fraud, build more profitable customer relationships, optimise operations and meet strict government regulations. Many of its products reach industry-wide adoption – such as the FICO Score, the standard measure of consumer credit risk in the USA. FICO solutions leverage open-source standards and cloud computing to maximise flexibility, speed deployment and reduce costs. The company also helps millions of people manage their personal credit health

Would you like to see your Press releases featured on GoMo News? If so, why not consider sponsoring pages on GoMo News? Email geoff (at) gomobilenews.com.


GoMo News